Monthly Archives: January 2017

Chicken and Mushroom Pie with Sage and Onion Stuffing Pastry

This is a lovely, filling chicken pie – an ideal weekday family supper that uses up the leftover chicken from Sunday lunch. You could make your own pastry and you could also make your own stuffing but leaving the recipe this way, means it’s quite effortless and really scrummy: perfect comfort food for a chilly winter’s evening.

Question: what else can I stuff into pastry toppings……? Time will tell, I’m sure!!!

Serves 4 – 6

 

What you need…

1 x 1 litre pie dish, buttered

for the stuffing

1 x 110g pack sage and onion stuffing mix

Knob of butter

Small handful fresh sage leaves, chopped

8 walnut halves, chopped

for the filling

200ml hot water from the kettle

1 chicken stockpot (I use Knorr)

100g butter

1 onion, sliced thinly

50g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

125ml single cream

500-600g cooked chicken (about 4 chicken breasts) chunked into bite-sized pieces

200g mushrooms, washed and sliced

2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

320g ready-rolled puff pastry

1 egg, beaten

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 190°c / 375°f / gas 5.

Make the stuffing as per the instructions and then stir in the butter, sage leaves and walnut halves until they’re evenly incorporated. Set aside to cool.

Make up chicken stock by using a balloon whisk to help dissolve the stockpot into the hot water. Set aside.

Now to the filling: melt the butter in a large saucepan over a moderate heat, add the onion and cook for 10 minutes until soft.

Mix in the flour and then add the stock and cream. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the chicken chunks, mushrooms and parsley and season with salt and pepper. Transfer to your pie dish and set aside.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pastry so that it is double the size of your pie dish. Spread the cooled stuffing over half of the pastry, folding the other half over the top of it so that you have a layer of stuffing in the middle. Roll out again so that it’s just a little bigger than your pie dish.

Brush the rim of your pie dish with beaten egg and then place the pastry over the pie. Fork the edges and make a hole in the middle to allow the cooking steam to escape. Trim off any excess pastry from around the sides. Brush the pastry with beaten egg and pop in the oven for 35 minutes and until the pastry is a rich, golden brown.

Serve your wonderful pie just by itself, with gravy or naughty potatoes. I don’t think any healthy greenery should be added to the plate – this is comfort food after all!

Inspired by…

Lisa Faulkner

How easy…

Very easy and relaxing to make.

Chicken with Mushrooms and Sherry Sauce

I saw Raymond Blanc do this on the telly and thought it looked absolutely yummy – it is, despite the fact that I didn’t use the specified ‘Morel’ mushrooms (which are hideously expensive). So I suspect that the flavours would have been even more fabulous than they were in my version. Really, really gorgeous and so simple to do – give it a go whether it’s a simple family meal or supper with friends – you won’t be disappointed. Oh, and the leeks: what Monsieur Blanc did with them is simply one of the best ways to serve them!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 teaspoon stock from a chicken stockpot (I use Knorr)

50 ml hot water from the kettle

4 plump chicken breasts

Sea salt and black pepper

1 tablespoon butter

200g wild or interesting mushrooms, washed and roughly torn

120g button mushrooms, washed and quartered

100ml dry sherry, boiled for 30 seconds to cook off the alcohol

200ml double cream

for the leeks

200ml water

Pinch sea salt

1 tablespoon butter

4 leeks, outer leaves removed, washed and sliced

What to do…

First, make a little chicken stock by using a balloon whisk to dissolve the stock from the stockpot into the hot water. Set aside.

Season the chicken breasts with salt and pepper. In a saucepan, melt the butter over a medium heat until it is foaming. Add the chicken breasts and colour lightly for 3 minutes on each side. Use a slotted spoon to remove the chicken from a pan and set aside.

In the butter remaining in the pan, chuck in the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Season with a pinch of salt and add the sherry, chicken stock and double cream. Bring to the boil and slip in the chicken breasts – which should be covered by the sauce. Lower the heat to a very gentle simmer and cook for 7 – 10 minutes, depending on the size of the chicken breasts.

Again using your slotted spoon, remove the chicken from the sauce and set aside. Turn the heat up to boil the sauce and cook until reduced by half (15 – 20 minutes on my hob) and thickened. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Actually, keep tasting because it’s bloody lovely!

Whilst the chicken breasts are cooking, turn your attention to the leeks. Into a saucepan, tip the water, salt and butter and bring to the boil. Tip in the leeks, pop on the lid and boil like mad for 3 minutes. That’s it!

To serve, place the chicken breasts back into the sauce to warm up for 2 minutes and then divide the chicken breasts and sauce between 4 plates, drain the leeks and serve them as well. We also had chunked up red potatoes that had been roasted in the oven with olive oil, salt, dried rosemary and chopped garlic. The whole supper is absolutely delicious – gotta love food blogging!

Inspired by…

Raymond Blanc

How easy…

Easy, relaxed and really quite joyful! Glass of wine in hand, obviously!

 

 

 

 

Burns Night Supper: Haggis with Wonderful Whisky Sauce

I know haggis is not for everyone but we love it. I am devoted to the Simon Howie brand that is so tasty, perfectly balanced with a little spicy edge to it. Served with this simply sumptuous sauce and the haggis is worth celebrating all by itself! Then you get the Neep & Tattie Mash with Parsley and Walnuts, adding an unexpectedly delicious dimension to the meal. Serve with a wee dram – an aged single malt if you can run to it. What a lovely supper – I don’t think we are going to wait for Mr. Burns birthday before we have this again though!!!!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

2 x 454g Haggis, (we love the Simon Howie Scottish butcher brand)

30g butter

2 large shallots, finely chopped

250ml whisky (not expensive)

1 litre hot water from the kettle

2 x beef stockpots (I use Knorr)

4 teaspoons Dijon mustard

200ml double cream

for the mash

700g swede, peeled and chunked

650g potatoes, peeled and chunked

125g turnips, peeled and chunked

1 tablespoon butter

Sea salt and black pepper

25g fresh parsley

50g walnut pieces

Grated zest of 1 lemon

100ml olive oil

What to do…

Cook both of the haggis according to the packet instructions – mine were to wrap in foil and pop in boiling water, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil and add the swede. Cook for 5 minutes then add the potatoes and turnips. Bring back to the boil and cook for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. Drain. Return the vegetables to the saucepan, add the butter, season and either mash or whisk. Pop the lid back on and keep warm.

In a mini chopper, chop the walnuts finely, add the parsley and chop again. Tip in the lemon, pour in the oil and whizz the lot together. Set aside.

Whilst the veg is bubbling along, you can make the fan-dabby-dozi sauce. Melt the butter in medium pan over a moderate heat. Add the shallots and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until soft and golden. Increase the heat and add the whisky. Simmer for 5 – 10 minutes until reduced by three-quarters.

Dilute the beef stockpots into the hot water with the aid of a balloon whisk to create your beef stock. Pour the stock into the shallots and whisky, add the Dijon mustard and simmer for 10 minutes or until reduced by three-quarters again. Add the cream, bring to a simmer and remove from the heat. Season, taste, adjust seasoning if needed. Set aside and keep warm.

Once your haggis’ are cooked, remove from the pan, discard the foil and peel back the plastic pouch. Cut the haggis into lovely chunky slices and serve onto warmed plates. Swirl the parsley and walnut oil into the mash or serve the mash and drizzle it over the top. Try not to be greedy and share the sauce between you all nicely.

Taste, enjoy, take a sip of your chosen wee dram. Repeat until plate and glass are both empty – shame!

Inspired by…

The birth of Robert Burns and then the Waitrose Weekend magazine!

How easy…

The haggis cooks itself, the sauce is a total joy to prepare and the mash is, well mash – not hard is it?

Drunken Hot Toddy Sponge Pudding

These lovely, easy little puddings are elevated to new heights with the introduction of the whisky-based drunken sauce. Perfect for a cold winter’s evening or to conclude a Burns Night Supper.

Serves 4

What you need…

4 x 180ml pudding moulds, liberally buttered

for the sauce

150 golden caster sugar

150ml double cream

150ml whisky

for the sponge puddings

115g salted butter, softened

75g golden caster sugar

40g runny honey

Zest of 1 large lemon

2 eggs, beaten

115g self-raising flour

What to do…

First to the sauce: place the sugar in a large saucepan (copper if you have it) over a high heat. Melt the sugar, swirling the pan rather than stirring the sugar to ensure the sugar caramelises evenly. Once the sugar has turned into a wonderful golden syrup, pour in the cream slowly, stirring it in as you go: the mixture will become volcanic – spitting in a frenzied fashion – don’t be alarmed: just lean back and keep stirring. Then add the whisky and stir until the sauce starts to bubble – simmer for a couple of minutes to cook off the alcohol (otherwise your sauce will blow your head off and be quite bitter if you’ve used cheap whisky!) Set aside.

Preheat your oven to 180°c / 350°f /gas 4.

Into your food processor tip the butter and sugar and whizz until pale and fluffy. Add the honey and lemon zest and whizz again until evenly mixed. Whilst still whizzing gradually pour in the eggs, incorporating each bit before adding any more. Tip in the flour and whizz to mix.

Into each pudding mould pour 2 tablespoons of the whisky sauce. Then divide the pudding batter evenly between the four moulds. Pop onto a baking tray and bake for 25 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out dry.

Invert the little lovelies out into bowls or largish plates so that much sauce can be indulged in! If you fancy being totally indulgent, serve with double cream as well as the whisky sauce. It’s certainly the best hot toddy I’ve ever had!!!

Inspired by…

John Whaite

How Easy…

The sauce requires steady nerves whilst you’re judging when it is sufficiently converted from sugar to syrup and then again when it performs its volcanic eruptions, but actually it’s all quite straight forward.

 

 

Rice Pudding with Cardamom and Rosewater

Rice pudding is a bit like Marmite in that you either love it or hate it. For some (John) it conjures up awful memories of boarding school; for me, I can remember as a child having it warmed up from the can after a Sunday roast with a big dollop of jam in the middle of my portion and later, as a teenager, eating it cold from the can as a treat!!!!!! Anyway, whatever your association, this recipe will be very far removed. Its beautifully creamy texture is contrasted by the sweet, exotic, middle-eastern flavour created from the infusion of cardamom seeds and rosewater: it’s like nothing I’ve ever tasted before and quite delicious – ideal to round off a spicy dinner.

Serves 6

What you need…

115g pudding rice

580ml cold water

300ml double cream

300ml full fat milk

4 green cardamom pods

80g caster sugar

2 teaspoons rosewater

20g unsalted pistachio nuts, finely chopped

What to do…

Put the rice in a sieve and rinse under cold running water. Transfer the rice to a medium-sized saucepan and pour in the cold water. Pop the lid on and bring to the boil over a moderate heat.

Reduce the temperature to low, remove the lid and simmer until nearly all the water has been absorbed, stirring frequently to prevent the rice sticking to the bottom of the pan.

Stir in the cream and milk. Bring the mixture back to the boil and then reduce the heat to low again. Simmer gently for 25 minutes, uncovered, stirring occasionally until the rice pudding has thickened to the texture of sloppy porridge. (I did the ironing during this part, stirring every time each item of clothing was finished!)

Use the side of a knife blade to gently press down on the cardamom pods to crack them open. Extract the seeds and crush them – a pestle and mortar are ideal for this. Add the sugar and cardamom seeds to the rice pudding and cooking for a further 2 minutes, stirring the whole time.

Remove from the heat and stir in the rosewater. Divide between 6 bowls and sprinkle the pistachios – absolutely delightful!

Inspired by…

Ruth Watson

How easy…

It cooks itself really, whilst you get on and do other things!

Broccoli and Stilton Soup

Baby, it’s cold outside but this soup is a real winter warmer! It’s also simplicity itself and is absolutely lovely, exuding the deep, rich flavours of the Stilton which are beautifully foiled by the broccoli – simply lovely and ridiculously simple to make. If you’ve got any leftover Stilton, this is definitely the way to go. I’m going to make sure that we regularly have some leftover Stilton!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 tablespoons rapeseed oil

1 onion, chopped finely

2 sticks celery, sliced

1 leek, sliced

2 medium potatoes, diced

1 knob butter

1 litre boiling water from the kettle

2 x chicken stockpots (I use Knorr)

1 head broccoli, roughly chopped

140g Stilton, roughly chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

Heat the rapeseed oil in a large saucepan over a moderate heat. Add the onions and cook until soft. Add the celery, leek, potato and a knob of butter; stir everything together until the butter has melted. Pop on the lid and let the lot sweat for 5 minutes.

In a jug, use a balloon whisk to dissolve the chicken stock pots into the boiling water to create a litre of chicken stock.

Remove the vegetable saucepan lid and pour in the stock and any tough, chunky bits of broccoli stalk. Cook for 10 minutes until all the vegetables are soft.

Add in the rest of the broccoli and cook for another 5 minutes. Tip your soup into a blender and whizz until smooth. Return the soup to your saucepan and add the Stilton, stirring it gently over a low heat until the cheese has melted. Taste, season, taste again and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

Divide between 4 bowls and enjoy this wonderful winter warmer treat of a soup! (Or share between two of you and freeze the rest for another day)

Inspired by…

BBC Good Food

How easy…

Dead easy! I carried on unpacking shopping and sorting out admin whilst it cooked itself!

Chicken, Mozzarella and Pesto Filo Parcels

I saw Tom Daley do these on TV and thought that they looked so very tasty as well as being so very easy and they are exactly that! An ideal gift of a lunch or supper (you do feel like you’re opening a present when you cut into them), these are really lovely and much more filling than I had thought. We did also think ‘ideal student food’ – one for you, Maddie!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking sheet, lined with reusable baking parchment

2 tablespoons olive oil

A large handful basil leaves, finely chopped

2 teaspoons pine nuts

450g skinless, boneless chicken breast, chopped into bite-sized pieces

8 sundried tomatoes, roughly chopped

250g mozzarella, chopped

8 rectangular sheets filo pastry, cut in half to make 16 squares

50g butter, melted

Sea salt and black pepper

What you do…

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6. Pop in your baking sheet to warm up whilst you make the parcels.

To create a pesto, put the oil, basil and pine nuts in mini chopper if you have one and whizz until smooth. If you don’t have a mini chopper, just chop the basil and nuts as finely as you can and then mix them with the oil.

Put the chicken, tomatoes and mozzarella into a bowl and add the pesto. Season liberally and stir everything together.

Take 4 squares of filo pastry and lay them one on top of another, but turning each one a little to the right to create a star outline once all four are on top of one another.

Divide the mixture evenly between the four pastry ‘stars’ piling it up in the middle of each.

Brush a little melted butter in a fat circle around the mixture and then scrunch each ‘star’ together to create 4 large moneybag shapes. Brush each parcel all over (except the base) with butter – this will help the pastry stick together and will also turn it a gorgeous golden brown when cooked.

Pop the parcels onto your preheated baking tray and bake them in the oven for about 25 minutes until golden.

There’s quite a bit of theatre to serving them: they look amazing and then when you cut into them for ‘the big reveal’ the delightful crunch of the buttery filo pastry gives way to the really very yummy contents inside!

Chick, Mozz & Pesto Filo Parcels Open w

Serving suggestion…

Green vegetables or a salad of tomatoes, mozzarella, basil and avocado, drizzled with a olive oil, balsamic vinegar and Dijon mustard dressing (which is what we did together with some fresh, warm, chunky bread – delish!)

Inspired by…

Olympic diver and now chef, Tom Daley

How easy…

Fabulously easy and very attractive on the eye as well as the palette!

 

 

Sticky Toffee Roulade

Ooooooooh, you DEFINITELY need to give this one a go! It’s utterly luscious, totally naughty, rich in flavour, deep in colour and I’m sure that it whispers, “Have some more, you know you want to!” And of course, there’s the necessary pre-cleaning of pan used to cook the sauce – I have a lovely little spatula that goes direct from saucepan to mouth……This would make a lovely dessert for Sunday lunch but equally, we had it on a rainy Thursday afternoon! You seriously don’t need an excuse!

What you need…

1 x 35 x 25cm Swiss roll tin, buttered and lined with parchment paper

150g dates, roughly chopped

225ml water

4 eggs, separated

75g soft dark brown sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

100g plain flour

Caster sugar for sprinkling

for the naughty sauce

200ml double cream

200g unsalted butter

200g soft dark brown sugar

50ml brandy

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 230°c / 450°f / gas 8.

Put the dates and water into a saucepan over a moderate heat and bring to the boil.

Meanwhile, tip the egg yolks and sugar into your food processor and whizz until the sugar has dissolved. Set aside. In a large bowl, use an electric handheld whisk to beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Set aside.

Tip the dates and water into your blender and whizz to create a fine purée.

Back to the main food processor, add the vanilla extract to the egg and sugar mixture whilst the motor is running; then the bicarbonate of soda and puréed dates, whizzing until evenly mixed together. Mix in the flour and then tip in one third of the egg whites and whizz until just mixed in (maybe 10 seconds). Then tip the whole lot into the remaining egg whites and use a balloon whisk to gently fold the eggs and mixture in together.

Tip the lot into your prepared tin. Bang the tin on the worktop to make sure the mixture is evenly spread and then pop in the oven for 12 minutes until the sponge is risen and golden.

Whilst the cake bakes, take the saucepan used to boil the dates and water and give it a quick wipe out with some kitchen roll before adding in all the sauce ingredients. Set over a moderate heat and gently bring to the boil, using your balloon whisk again to beat until smooth. Simmer for a few minutes to thicken.

Lay a damp tea towel on your worktop and on top, add a large piece of parchment paper (bigger than the Swiss roll tin). When the cake comes out of the oven, invert it onto the parchment paper – this is quite tricky but the tea towel will at least keep the parchment paper in place whilst you do this. Gently peel off the tin-lining paper. Then spread one third of the sauce over the sponge, making sure that you take it right to the edges. Then gently roll up the sponge from a short side to create a lovely, luscious fat roll.

Transfer to a serving plate and sprinkle with caster sugar. Pour your naughty sauce into a serving jug.

To serve, fend off enthusiastic tasters and cut the roulade into nice chunky slices, pouring over the wicked sauce……and indulge, enjoy, savour…cut another slice – simply divine!

Serving suggestion…

I don’t actually think it needs anything else at all but you could serve it with brandy ice cream (already blogged). I tried it both ways and they were both delicious.

Inspired by…

James Martin

How easy…

Really easy, very quick but you do create quite a bit of a mess using both the main processor and blender, electric whisk, balloon whisk, large bowl and saucepan in the prep. That said, it is absolutely worth it!

 

Roast Fillets of Pork with Prune and Apple

Our default Sunday lunch is Roast Chicken and John is the one who makes this weekly treat, served with Yorkshires and roasted root vegetables (already blogged) but last week, I fancied a change and had seen this recipe in a magazine. The pork is fabulous: the meat is moist and succulent and the stuffing, flavoured with sage, prunes and apples, is simply sublime. The finishing touch is the wonderful crispy Parma ham that is the wrapping to this rather wonderful gift of a lunch. Definitely put this one on your Sunday lunch list – you won’t regret it!!!

Serves 6 – 8

What you need…

1 x baking tin, lined with baking parchment

Knob of butter

1 large onion, roughly chopped

1 medium Bramley apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped

Sausagemeat from 3 pork sausages

50g ready-to-eat dried prunes, roughly chopped

1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

2 x 450g pork fillets

8 slices Parma ham

for the gravy

300ml boiling water from the kettle

1 x chicken stockpot (I use Knorr)

2 tablespoons flour

100g chicken gravy granules

200ml apple juice

A good slosh of Marsala wine

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

First, make the stuffing. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over a high heat, add the onion and sauté for 1 minute. Pop on the lid and sweat over a low heat for 15 minutes until soft. Add the apple and stir for a few moments. Set aside.

Put the sausagemeat, prunes and sage into a bowl. Season and then add the onion and apple. Stir to thoroughly incorporate.

Cover a large board with cling film. Place the pork fillets on top and then cover them with cling film. Take a rolling pin and bash the fillets until they are roughly one third thinner than when they started. Remove the cling film and spread the stuffing on one fillet, placing the other one on the top of the stuffing.

Onto your baking tin, lay eight slices of Parma ham, slightly overlapping and sit the fillets on the top so they lay across the ham. Roll up like a roulade so that the Parma ham is sealed underneath. My Parma ham kept breaking up so I produced more of a patchwork effect but that didn’t seem to spoil the overall appearance, so just go with the flow.

Pop your pork into the oven and roast for about 1 hour, until crispy and cooked through. Transfer to a warmed serving plate to rest.

Whilst your pork is cooking, turn your attention to the gravy. First, make your stock by using a balloon whisk to dissolve the stockpot into the boiling water. Into a hot saucepan tip the flour and then, over a high heat, gradually tip in the stock, thoroughly whisking in each addition before adding any more. Once all the stock is in, pour in the apple juice. This then, was the end of Mary’s recipe. We however thought that the gravy was too sweet and a little light on body so we tweaked as follows: tip the gravy granules into a large jug and then whisk in some of the hot stock/apple juice mixture. Gradually add all the liquid to the granules, whisking as you go and then pour it all back into the saucepan. Bring to the boil and then slosh in some Marsala. Taste. Season and add more Marsala to taste – pretty damned good!!!

Serve your pork in slices with the gravy – absolutely delightful and very, very moreish!

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy…

The pork itself is dead easy. As you can see though, we struggled a bit with the gravy. For us, Mary’s version was too sweet. We were however very happy with the tweaked version which was a rich and smooth with a gentle sweetness from the apple juice. My advice would be to make the pork following the instructions and then to make your own favourite gravy, adding a little apple juice to it!

 

 

Creamy Artichoke Soup with Parmesan-Coated Peelings

Simply gorgeous! I’ve had this recipe for a couple of years but had difficulty locating the lumpy bumpy tubers called artichokes. Spotted in Waitrose this week, I thought I’d give this a go. Having never tried artichokes, I had no idea what to expect so I was delighted to taste a gorgeous soup that is distinctive, smooth and elegant. We had it for supper but it would make a fabulous (and easy) dinner party starter – give it a go!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking sheet, lined with baking parchment

Juice ½ lemon

500g Jerusalem artichokes

2 teaspoons rapeseed oil

25g butter

1 onion, roughly chopped

1 x 140g floury potato, roughly chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

600ml boiling water from the kettle

2 chicken stockpots (I use Knorr)

3 tablespoons double cream

1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese, finely grated

1 rosemary sprig, leaves picked and finely chopped

What to do…

Half-fill a large bowl with tap water and squeeze in the lemon juice. Peel the artichokes and cut them into chunks, chucking them into the lemony water. Toss the peelings into a separate bowl, add the oil and stir in. That’s the prep done!

Melt the butter in a large saucepan and add the onion, potato, sea salt and black pepper. Drain the artichokes and tip them in as well. Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over a low heat with the lid on for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

Use a balloon whisk to dissolve the stockpots into the boiling water and then pour it over the vegetables. Pop the lid back on and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until the artichokes are tender.

Tip the lot into your blender and whizz until smooth. Tip back into the saucepan, stir in the cream, taste and adjust the seasoning to suit.

Meanwhile, prepare the artichoke peelings to garnish. Spread the oiled peelings over your baking tray and pop in the oven for 5 minutes. Turn them over and scatter with Parmesan and rosemary. Cook for a further 5 minutes.

Pour this gorgeous soup into four bowls and garnish with the Parmesan peelings – just divine!

What Jerusalem artichokes are all about…

From the sunflower family and also known as sunchokes, these tubers grow underground and look like large, lumpy, bumpy knobs of ginger. They taste slightly nutty and smoothly savoury: a cross between an artichoke heart and the best potato you’ve ever had!

Inspired by…

bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Really easy; the only tricky and somewhat time-consuming bit is peeling the artichokes because they’re so knobbly.