Monthly Archives: January 2018

Pot-Roast Chicken Thighs with Parsnips

This dish may not look that great but boy, it’s packed with flavour! The meat is succulent, the parsnips somehow enhance in taste and the sauce is delicious and creamy. An absolutely perfect supper dish for a winter’s evening.

Serves 4

What you need…

Splash of rapeseed oil

6 shallots, sliced in half

4 parsnips, peeled and chunked

8 garlic cloves, chopped

12-16 chicken thighs, filleted (quantity depends on your appetite!)

Black pepper and sea salt

500ml hot water from the kettle

1 chicken stock pot (I use Knorr)

12 sprigs thyme

20 juniper berries, lightly crushed

200ml double cream

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4.

Use a balloon whisk to beat the stockpots into the hot water to create your chicken stock.

Over a moderate heat, warm the rapeseed oil in a casserole dish for which you have a lid. Toss in the shallots, parsnips and garlic and cook until lightly brown. Remove ingredients from pan with a slotted spoon.

Season the chicken with black pepper and then brown lightly in the oil. Remove, again using the slotted spoon.

Pour the chicken stock into the pan and bring to the boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to mix in any delicious leftover morsels.

Return the chicken and vegetables to the pan, tuck in the thyme sprigs and season with a little salt and chuck in the juniper berries. When everything returns to the boil, pop on the lid and put the casserole into your oven for 30 minutes.

Remove the chicken pieces and wrap in foil to keep warm.

Turn the hob heat up high and reduce the liquid by half – it won’t thicken but will give you sweet, creamy juices. Stir in the cream and check the seasoning. Return the chicken to the pan and cook for a couple minutes more to make sure everything is thoroughly hot.

Serve in shallow bowls, maybe with some fresh doorsteps of bread on the side to dunk.

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater, although he used partridges rather than chicken thighs. I tried it with parsnips but found the wee birds a pain to pick the meat off. Filleted chicken thighs mean you can just tuck straight in.

How easy…

Very easy but it does take a little faffing about – well worth it though!

Mincemeat, Apple and Panettone Pudding

So, I checked this recipe out last week, having just enough mincemeat and panettone left from Christmas – a good way of using it up I thought. As you can see from the image, this pudding is not the most glamorous. However, on tasting the first mouthful, both John and I were blown away. Underneath that brown topping is a pudding that is simply and lusciously sensational. It’s that good, that I’m doing it again this Sunday after a roast dinner with friends but…am going to have to make more mincemeat and have been donated a spare panettone to complete the task! It’s worth it!!!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

1 x baking dish, liberally buttered

500g sharp eating apples

3 tablespoons water

200g mincemeat

60g butter, melted

250g panettone, processed to course crumbs

1 tablespoon demerara sugar

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4.

Peel, core and chunk the apples and tip them into a saucepan with the water. Bring to the boil and then lower the heat, leaving the apples to collapse into a purée (I left my quite lumpy as I like finding little chunks of apple in amongst the mixture).

Remove from the heat and gently stir through the mincemeat – don’t mix it altogether to a brown mush but rather leave it unevenly mixed – looks and tastes better. Tip the whole lot into your baking dish.

Pour the melted butter into the panettone crumbs and mix thoroughly to create a loose, moist jumble of crumbs and dried fruit.

Tip the crumbs over the mincemeat and apple, leaving the surface rough and rustic! Sprinkle over the demerara sugar and bake in the oven for about 20 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Serve with custard, double cream or ice-cream. Watch how fast this glorious pud is demolished!!!!

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater

How easy…

Sloth like effort required. Perfect for a leisurely Sunday lunch.

Golden Milk (Turmeric Latte)

Serves 1 Joyful Person

Over the last year I have been exploring the wonder that is Ayurveda (a several thousand year old holistic approach to wellbeing, literally translated as ‘life knowledge’). Whilst I would need a whole new blog to share with you this fascinating subject, I will instead start by introducing you to this fabulous drink that is now the cup of sunshine that starts my day. It comes from a book by Jasmine Hemsley who has compiled a collection of Ayurvedic recipes from the east that are easily ‘digested’ by us westerners and she clearly has many more years experience in this area that I do.

Anyway, this gorgeous ‘hug in a mug’ of a drink is sweet, spicy, fragrant and comforting whilst also invigorating. It improves digestion and contains the healing combination that is turmeric with black pepper. Give it a go – you’ll be hooked!

What you need…

250ml almond milk

60ml water

3 cardamom pods, cracked

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated (don’t bother peeling first)

½ tablespoon jaggery (natural cane sugar ) grated

What to do…

Put all the ingredients except the jaggery into a small saucepan and gently simmer for 10-15 minutes. Stir through the jaggery and adjust the sweetness to taste.

Strain and serve this warming liquid sunshine and…..relax.

Inspired by…

Jasmine Hemsley, East by West

How easy…

An absolute doddle but you do need a little time (but it’s so worth it!)

 

Quick and Easy Eggs Benedict

Always fancied this one as a lazy Saturday morning treat but the prospect of perfecting hollandaise sauce always put me off. That and the fact that my poached eggs have always been a bit hit and miss. So, having discovered solutions for both of those issues, there was no holding me back! The result is a lovely dish that definitely sets the tone for a relaxed weekend: think soft, running egg dribbling over salty-sweet ham and nestling on a warmed toasty English muffin and to finish – a good dollop of the rich silky, smooth hollandaise sauce – enjoy with strong coffee, a paper full of good news (!) and some gentle background music. Happy Weekend!

Serves 4

What you need…

4 large, happy eggs

4 slices Serrano ham

4 English muffins, sliced in half

for the hollandaise sauce

200g butter

4 happy egg yolks

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

½ tablespoon Dijon mustard

What to do…

Put a wide saucepan of water over a high heat to come to a rapid simmer in readiness for poaching your eggs.

For each egg, lay a 40cm sheet of non-PVC cling film flat on a work surface and rub with a little oil. Crack your egg into the middle and then pull in the sides of the cling film and gently squeeze out any air around the egg. Twist, then tie a firm knot in the cling film to secure each of your eggs snugly inside. Set aside your 4 weird little parcels whilst you conjure up the hollandaise sauce.

In a small saucepan, gently melt the butter. Meanwhile, in a bowl over a pan of simmering water (bain marie) tip in the egg yolks, lemon juice and Dijon mustard and whisk together using a handheld electric whisk.

Transfer the melted butter to a jug and very, very gradually add it to the egg yolks, a little at a time, whisking the whole time, to create a smooth, thickened sauce. Taste and adjust the flavour by whisking in a little more Dijon or wholegrain mustard, if liked. Take the bain marie off the heat but keep the bowl over the water to keep the sauce warm whilst you finish off the main dish. Pop a small balloon whisk or a spoon in there to give the sauce a quick stir every now and then.

Now, whop your muffin halves in the toaster/under the grill and cook until golden.

Meanwhile, drop your egg ‘parcels’ into the pan of simmering water and poach for 6 – 7 minutes, until soft-poached.

For each lucky person enjoying this little morning treat, pop the two halves of each muffin onto a warmed plate and drizzle over a little hollandaise sauce on both. Arrange a slice of Serrano ham on the bottom half of the muffin.

Snip open a cling film parcel, unwrap the egg and place on top. Drizzle with more hollandaise and…..enjoy! Scrumptious!

Tip…

If you’re wondering what the other half of the muffin is used for, it’s to mop up the excess runny egg!

Inspired by…

Well, this one is a bit of a collaboration! I have Izy Hossack (student and blogger) to thank for her hollandaise sauce recipe; Jamie Oliver for his approach to poached eggs and James Winter, who wrote one of my favourite cook books ‘Who Put the Beef in Wellington’ for the recipe idea!

How easy…

I know that I’ve simplified this dish, particularly the hollandaise sauce, which may not be authentic. That said, it’s a quick and easy very yummy treat my way!

Hot-Smoked Fish and Leek Pie

This gorgeous pie is, for me, the perfect antidote to all the rich menus of Christmas without the usual deprivation that is often present in January meals (as everyone announces the need to diet). It’s still indulgent with the help of puff pastry and cream but is also light and really, really tasty given the combination of smoked fish and fresh herbs. It also has the advantages of being really easy and a filling that you make in advance – great for a supper sharing with friends and family.

Serves 8

What you need…

2 x large baking sheets, 1 of which is lined with baking parchment

500g leeks, sliced into 1cm chunks and washed

40g butter

3 heaped tablespoons plain flour

250g hot smoked salmon, forked roughly into large flakes

250g smoked mackerel, forked roughly into large flakes

500ml double cream 500ml

300g red potatoes, quartered and sliced into £1 coin-thick pieces

4 tablespoons rapeseed oil

Sea salt and black pepper

3 tablespoons parsley, chopped

1½ tablespoons tarragon, chopped

375g puff pastry

1 large, happy egg, lightly beaten

1 tablespoon nigella/poppy seeds

What to do…

Melt the butter in a deep heavy-based pan over a moderate heat and then tip in the leeks. Pop on a lid and cook for 10 minutes, so they are soft but not brown.

Gently warm the double cream in a small pan and remove from the heat. Add the flour to the leeks, stir and leave to cook for a couple of minutes then gently stir the fish into the leeks. Pour over the warm double cream and leave to cook over a low heat for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Meanwhile, warm the rapeseed oil in a shallow pan then sauté the potato slices on both sides over a moderate heat until golden on the outside but still soft in the middle.

Fold the cooked potatoes into the fish and leek cream, season to taste with salt and black pepper; then gently stir through the chopped parsley and tarragon. Transfer to a mixing bowl and leave to cool before thoroughly chilling in the fridge (preferably overnight). If you skip this step it will be impossible to shape the pie.

Set the oven at 200˚c / 400˚f / gas 6. Place the unlined baking sheet upside down in the oven.

Cut the pastry in half then roll out each piece into a rectangle of   about 32cm x 22cm. Place one rectangle on the remaining lined baking sheet and then pile the cold filling on top of the pastry, leaving a border on all four sides of at least 2cm.

Smooth the top of the filling so you have a deep rectangle of mixture. Brush the bare edges of the pastry generously with the beaten egg.

Place the second sheet of pastry over the filling then press the edges of the two pieces of pastry firmly together to seal well (to prevent leakage).

Brush the top layer of pastry all over with more beaten egg, scatter with the nigella or poppy seeds, then pierce a small hole in the centre with knife or the handle of wooden spoon.

Pop in the oven, placing your pie-laden baking sheet on top of the hot, upturned one, and bake for 40 minutes or until golden brown.

Leave to rest for 5 minutes before sliding off the baking sheet onto a serving board or dish and slicing into thick generous slices of gorgeousness – enjoy!

Tip…

I believe that placing the food-laden baking sheet on top of an already hot one reduces the chances of a soggy bottom when cooking pastry and I now do this with all pastry bakes.

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater

How easy…

Very easy. Quite a lot of washing up for the prep of the filling but I love the fact that you do very little the day you actually want to eat it!