Author Archives for Cindy Duffield

Haggis, Neeps and Tatties with Whisky Sauce and Asparagus Parcels

Burns Night Supper! Over the years, we’ve been to many a Burns night bash and the food has ranged from appalling to mediocre – rarely better than that. And until this evening, I always thought that whisky was harsh and horrible: a horror that needed to be dispensed with in the name of tradition as fast as possible. Tonight however, we stayed in and did this fabulous take on the Burns Night fare. The haggis dish was waaaaaaay better than I could possibly have hoped for and met with considerable enthusiasm all around the table. We are DEFINITELY having this again – I would recommend it highly, Burns Night or not. And then there was the whisky. I unearthed a bottle that has remained untouched since John’s 60th birthday and WOW! sheer nectar. That said, it was a Knockando Single Malt, aged 12 years. It was a gift – I’m not looking up the cost but it finished off this delightful meal perfectly!

Serves 4

What you need…

for the asparagus parcels

One flat baking tray, lightly oiled

8 asparagus spears, trimmed

2 slices prosciutto di parma

Sea salt and black Pepper

Just a little Parmesan cheese, grated

for the whisky sauce

Knob butter

1 shallot, finely chopped

2 tablespoons whisky (any old blended, not the Knockando!!!)

2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard

200ml water

1 beef stock pot (I use Knorr)

80ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning

for the haggis

1 x cookie cutter (slightly larger than the diametre of the haggis) lightly oiled

1 Haggis (I love the ‘Simon Howie, the Scottish Butcher’, it’s slightly spicy and very yummy).

8 potatoes, peeled and halved

125g butter

Splash milk

4 turnips, peeled and halved

6 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks

What to do…

To prepare the asparagus parcels, poach the asparagus in boiling, salted water for 2 minutes. Drain and cool to the point that they are easy to handle.

Lay out one slice of Parma ham. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and Parmesan and then cut in half lengthways.

Using one ‘half slice’ of Parma ham, place two asparagus spears at one end and roll up so the Parma ham is the wrapping around your asparagus. Place on your baking tray. Repeat with the remaining asparagus and Parma ham so that you have four asparagus bundles – one each – they’re just a garnish, really.

Pop them in the fridge until you are nearly ready to serve.

You can also pre-prepare the sauce. Using a balloon whisk dissolve the stock pot into the water. Set aside. Melt the butter over a moderate heat and gently fry the shallots for 10 minutes. Add the wholegrain mustard and mix in well. Pour in the beef stock and bring to the boil. Add the whisky, boil for another minute to remove the alcohol and then turn the heat down and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. Allow to cool for a few minutes, then gradually stir in the cream. Set aside until nearly ready to serve.

To cook the haggis, follow the boiling instruction that comes with it. In my case, it is simply to pop the haggis into a saucepan, bring to the boil and simmer gently for 45 minutes – couldn’t be easier.

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

In one saucepan, bring your potatoes to the boil in salted water and then simmer for 20 minutes or until soft. Likewise, in another saucepan, bring your turnips and carrots to the boil and then simmer for 20 minutes or until soft.

To the potatoes, add 75g butter and the splash of milk and either mash or use a handheld electric whisk to cream the potatoes. Taste and season until it suits you. Pop the lid on to keep warm.

To the turnips and carrot, add 50g butter and similarly, mash or cream with a whisk. Taste and season until it suits you. Pop the lid on to keep warm.

Pop your asparagus in the oven for 4-5 minutes whilst you assemble the dish.

Put your whisky sauce on a moderate heat to warm through.

Drain the haggis and cut it into nice chunky slices.

For each serving, place your cookie cutter, in the centre of the plate and squash into it the creamed potato, filling the cookie cutter two thirds of the way up. Top up with the turnip and carrot mixture. Gently lift the cookie cutter away, wipe over with kitchen roll and run olive oil around the inside again with your finger and repeat the process for each of the other servings. Top your stacks with a chunky slice of haggis and then an asparagus parcel.

Pour the sauce into a jug and serve at the table. Enjoy this wonderful dish of haggis, neeps and tatties with whisky sauce and asparagus parcels with or without any of the other traditions. We just needed an excuse to find a great haggis recipe – enjoy!

Tip…

Rather than finely chopping shallots, I use Cooks’ Ingredients Handful of Chopped Shallots. Frozen and in a foil bag, I just shake into the saucepan roughly the right quantity – dead easy!

Inspired by…

Well…. a bit of a collection of ideas thrown together. I saw an image of one version of the ‘stack’ on the Ocado website and that was enough to get me going. I already had the recipe for the asparagus parcels (previously blogged as a canapé) and the sauce is my own – made up on the spur of the moment and I have to say, rather lovely!

How easy…

Very easy! All the elements kinda cook themselves. I like that the prep on the asparagus and sauce can be done in advance so you’re not juggling like crazy at the end.

Oozy Focaccia Bread with Cheeses, Spinach and Tomato

Warm bread straight from the oven is always a winner but this loaf, stuffed with melted cheese, sun-dried tomatoes and spinach as well as a hint of rosemary is just scrumptious! Ideal as a tearing and sharing starter or as part of a ‘fridge-raid’ supper (where we dump onto the table cheeses, patés and salads and just dive in), Oozy Focaccia bread with Cheeses, Spinach and Tomato is easy enough to ensure it has a regular place at the table.

 Serves 8

 What you need…

1 x lightly oiled baking sheet

500g packet garlic and rosemary focaccia bread mix (I use Wright’s)

300ml hand-hot water

3 tablespoons oil

100g dolcelatte

125g mozzarella

75g baby spinach leaves

55g sun-dried tomatoes

10 rosemary sprigs

1 tablespoon rock salt

What to do…

Tip the bread mix into a large bowl. Stir in the water and 2 tablespoons of oil to form a soft dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured worktop and knead for 2 – 3 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Rinse and dry your large bowl and lightly oil it. Pop the bread dough into the bowl, cling film it and leave it in a warm place (next to a radiator or in the airing cupboard in my case) for 30 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto your floured work surface again and knead for a another two minutes.

Divide the dough into two and press each into circles of roughly 20cm. Lay one circle onto your baking sheet and scatter over the cheeses, tomatoes and spinach. Wet the rim and then cover with the remaining circle. Pinch the edges to seal. Leave in a warm place for 30 minutes until slightly risen.

Preheat oven to 200c / 400f / gas 6.

Push your fingers into the top of the bread to dimple the dough and push small springs of rosemary into the bread. Scatter with rock salt and drizzle with the remaining olive oil. Pop in the oven and bake for 30-35 minutes until golden brown and risen. Serve warm, gooey slices and enjoy!

Inspired by…

No idea! Another one of those recipes torn from a magazine and kept in a file for several years!

How easy…

Very easy and there is something wonderfully satisfying about kneading bread dough. The only concern, if there is one at all, is to remember before you get going that time is required for the two 30 minute proofings.

Dairy-Free Mango Lassi

 

I’m not sure how authentic this is – Lassi heralds from India as a cooling yogurt drink and I know that you can get both salty and sweet varieties, both of which I believe contain spice – but for me this is a little bit of lusciousness in a glass and sometimes we swap this out for the usual breakfast smoothie with chia seeds (see previous blog). One of my favourite fruits, I love the way the mango in this ‘milkshake’ exudes its soft, fresh flavour – delicious!

Serves 4

What you need…

250ml Alpro Simply Plain yogurt

100ml Alpro Almond milk

300g fresh mango (buy it ready-prepared: saves a lot of faffing about)

1 dessertspoon runny honey (Manuka if you’re wearing a particularly healthy halo)

What to do…

Chuck the lot in your food process blender and whizz for about 1 minute, give or take!!!! Serve your dairy-free mango lassi and enjoy – feelin’ good!!!

Inspired by…

Jamie Oliver, Happy Days with the Naked Chef

How easy…

Wop the ingredients in the blender – that’s it!

 

Old English Port Wine Jellies with Frosted Grapes

If, like me, you grew up in the 1970s you will probably remember the regular arrival of jelly and Carnation Cream as a pudding. I can recall with relish, gently mashing up the jelly and watching with fascination as the yellow-white ‘cream’ filtered through the jelly’s cracks. These days, jelly has fallen out of fashion, but I came across this recipe in one of Delia’s books and had to give it a go! It bears no resemblance to the 1970s versions, happily!!!!

Especially after a heavy main course, this dessert is simply delightful! An oldie but a goodie, it is light, fragrant and cool, not at all what you’d expect when you see that the ingredients include port and wine.

I didn’t ruin it with the addition of Carnation (that’s got to be spectacularly bad for you!) but tried it with and without a little cream and both versions work really well. Jelly is definitely back in fashion in this house!

Serves 4

What you need…

for the jellies

Four pretty stemmed glasses to serve

75g granulated sugar

285 ml water

1 stick cinnamon

3 cloves

Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon

1½ 12g packets powdered gelatine

210ml port (nothing too expensive)

75ml light red wine (I used a cheap Pinot Noir)

for the frosted grapes

Bunch seedless grapes, washed and dried

1 egg white

Caster Sugar

Bake O Glide/greaseproof paper

What to do…

Tip the sugar into a saucepan together with the water, cinnamon stick, cloves, lemon zest and juice. Cover the pan bring to the boil, then remove from the heat. Sprinkle in the gelatine and, using a balloon whisk. Gently whisk to dissolve. Let it cool for 15 minutes, gently whisking occasionally.

Strain the spices and zest from the syrup, pouring it into a jug. Stir in the port and wine and then taste. The flavour should be strong and rather sweeter than you might like but the sweetness lessens once the mixture is chilled and set, so add a little more sugar if you think it needs it (I added another 2 teaspoons) and stir it in until it dissolves. Pour the jelly syrup into your four stemmed glasses and pop in the fridge to set.

Meanwhile, onto your frosted grapes. Take two small bowls and in one, whisk up the egg white using a fork. In the other, tip in some caster sugar.

From your bunch of grapes, choose little bunches of two or three, ensuring that you leave them attached to their stalks as you separate them from the main bunch. Simply dip them into the egg yolk and then into the caster sugar, ensuring that they are evenly covered with the sugar, providing them with a frosted look. When you lift them out of the egg white, make sure there are no globules of egg white hanging off – they don’t look attractive when covered with caster sugar! Sit your bunches of frosted grapes onto a strip of Bake O Glide or greaseproof paper and set them somewhere cool and dry for a couple of hours (or overnight).

When you’re ready to serve your old English port wine jellies with frosted grapes, simply retrieve the jellies from the fridge and pop the frosted grapes on the top – so easy, so elegant, so delicious! Enjoy!

Serving suggestion…

A little jug of double cream with a teaspoon of caster sugar mixed in.

Inspired by…

Delia Smith (her Christmas book but I think this is a winner throughout the winter)

How easy…

Extremely easy, very quick and next to no mess!

 

 

 

 

Roasted Fish with Lemon, Anchovies, Capers and Rosemary

A lovely family supper dish, this fish dish ticks all the boxes in terms of taste, ease of preparation, minimal washing up and being really quite healthy! The combination of the soft rosemary, zingy lemon, edgy anchovies and sharp capers works brilliantly to jazz up even the most mundane of fish – I use whatever fish is hanging about in the freezer, sometimes mixing up three different types – it doesn’t matter – it’s still great!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking dish, lightly buttered (mine is 26 x 17 x 7cms deep)

Handful rosemary, leaves picked

4 tablespoons olive oil

4 – 6 x fish fillets, both hake and cod work well (quantity depends on how hungry you are!)

Sea salt and black pepper, for seasoning

2 large unwaxed lemons, thinly sliced

Handful capers

8 anchovy fillets

What to do…

Preheat oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

Bruise the rosemary in a pestle and mortar to bring out the flavour. Add the olive oil and squash the rosemary some more to flavour the oil.

Wodge your fish into the baking dish and then pour over half the rosemary/oil mixture, spreading it evenly over the fish. Season with salt and pepper.

Cover the fish in the lemon slices, scatter over the capers and then drape over the anchovies.

Drizzle over the remaining rosemary/oil mixture and pop in the oven for 20 minutes. That’s it – done – a really quick, healthy and tasty family supper – we enjoy our roasted fish with lemon, anchovies, capers and rosemary with steamed mixed cabbage and either Parmentier or buttery new potatoes.

Inspired by…

Jamie Oliver, Happy Days with the Naked Chef

How easy…

Very easy, just an assembly job really!

Red Lentil, Chickpea and Chilli Soup

This is a really wonderful soup, especially when it’s soooo cold out there! The spice provided by the cumin seeds and chilli make you feel all warm inside and give the soup a hint of the Middle-East; then there’s the contrasting fresh kick of the coriander. It’s robust, thick, filling and packed with flavour, it’s also really cheap, very fast and simple. And finally, no naughty ingredients so if you’re doing that whole January dieting thing, this fits in perfectly but tastes fantastic!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

850ml water, boiled, straight from the kettle

2 vegetable stock pots (I use Knorr)

2 teaspoons cumin seeds

Pinch of hot chilli powder

Splash rapeseed oil

1 red onion, roughly chopped

140g red lentils

400g can chopped tomatoes

½ 400g can chickpeas (drain and freeze the rest for another time)

Handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped plus some to scatter over the top

What to do…

Make vegetable stock by filling a large jug up to 850ml with boiling water and drop in the two vegetable stock pots. Use a balloon whisk to dissolve and mix in the stock pots.

In a large saucepan, dry-fry the cumin seeds for about a minute or until they start jumping around the pan! Add the chilli powder and give it a quick stir. Then, splash in some rapeseed oil together with the onion and cook for a further 5 minutes on a moderate heat. Stir in the lentils, stock and tomatoes, then bring to the boil. Simmer for 15 minutes.

Chuck in the chickpeas and coriander and then put all the soup ingredients into the blender jug of your food processor. Whizz until the soup is a lovely thick and smooth purée.

Pour into soup bowls or mugs and enjoy the heat and sunshine that emanates from your red lentil, chickpea and chilli soup – lovely.

Inspired by…

www.bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Childs’ Play!

 

Mini Baked Alaskas

 

Fabulous little desserts these! People are often a little terrified of Baked Alaska, instantly picturing an oven splattered with dripping ice cream but they’re really easy to make and they make quite an entrance when delivered to the table. You can also have great fun with them, swapping out the idea of everyone enjoying the same flavour ice cream with a ‘lucky-dip’ approach: four different flavours but who knows which one you’re getting! A further joy is passing a blow torch around the table for your fellow diners to finish off cooking their Alaskas with a bit of drama! Lest we get carried away with the presentation aspect of these little bombes, they taste pretty amazing too!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x 7cm or 8cm cookie cutter

1 x flat baking tray

Kitchen blow torch (optional)

Chocolate cake, shop-bought or home-made (see blog recipe for 365 Chocolate Celebration Cake if you want to make your own).

4 individual tubs of ice cream – flavours of your choice – either all the same or all different. I like salted caramel, cookie dough, coffee and caramel chew chew.

4 egg whites

170g golden caster sugar

What to do…

Remove your chosen tubs of ice cream from the freezer and set aside for five minutes.

Using your cookie cutter, cut 4 thick slices from the cake and pop them on a baking tray.

Run a knife around the side of your ice creams and then ease them out onto the cake slices. Put the tray with your cake and ice cream into the freezer for at least an hour or until you are ready to finish off and serve.

Preheat your oven to 200c / 400f / gas 6.

Using an electric hand whisk, whisk the egg whites to soft peaks and then add the sugar in 4 batches, whisking as you go until you have a stiff, glossy mixture (you can also leave this to sit in the fridge for a few hours if you want to prepare in advance).

Retrieve your Alaskas from the freezer and cover each one with a thick layer of meringue, making it nice and spiky and ensuring that the ice cream is thoroughly covered. Pop in the oven for 4 minutes: the meringue will brown slightly without the ice cream melting…..honest!

Serve your mini baked Alaskas to your anticipative diners and either dive straight in or hand around the blow torch for a more dramatic and torched look! Watch as everyone enjoys the singular wonder that is a Mini Baked Alaska!

Tips…

If you are using the 365 Chocolate Celebration Cake, use half the sponge ingredients and use just one cake tin – there will be loads left over – enough to sandwich together four generous slices with chocolate butter cream – chef’s treats!!

If you didn’t fancy going down the chocolate route for these little bombes, swap out the chocolate cake for Madeira, and choose complementary ice creams, e.g. vanilla, strawberry cheesecake – there’s so much choice now.

Inspired by…

www.bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Ridiculously easy for something that looks and tastes so amazing!

Partridge with Wild Mushroom Ravioli

This is a proper winter indulgence: the rich sauce and delicious partridge perfectly contrasted by the lightness of the ravioli, packed with intense flavour. The first time I made this, I used a pasta machine to make my own pasta and whilst it wasn’t hard, it was messy, time-consuming and quite tricky to deal with the ever-lengthening pasta strips and to get them to the necessary thinness (thick pasta is not great). So, on the basis that life’s too short, I’ve replaced that process with the use of ready-made pasta – it’s a lot easier unless you are a perfectionist with either a lot of time on your hands and a love of clearing up or an absolute whizz with the pasta machine! Given that change, this dish is lovely, indulgent and really quite quick to knock up!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 partridges (ask your butcher to separate and de-bone the breasts from the rest of the birds)

2 small carrots, peeled, topped and tailed

1 onion, peeled and quartered

1 bay leaf

for the ravioli

1 x cookie cutter, 7-8cms wide

12 fresh lasagne sheets

Knob of butter

100g wild/mixed mushrooms

3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves picked

150ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning

for the sauce

1 beef stock pot (I use Knorr)

Splash olive oil

Knob of butter

250g wild/mixed mushrooms

100ml double cream

A few sprigs thyme, to garnish

What to do…

Remove your lasagne sheets from the fridge to come to room temperature.

Separate the partridge breasts from the rest of the birds, leaving the breasts in the fridge for now. Cut from the remaining partridge carcass whatever meat you can get and pop it into your food processor – we’ll get back to that later.

To enhance your sauce, make a quick stock: take a medium saucepan and chuck in the remaining partridge carcass, carrots, onion and bay leaf, season and cover with water. Bring to the boil, cover and then simmer for 20 minutes. Sieve the ‘stock’ into a jug, retaining just 200ml (chuck the rest) and then, using a small balloon whisk, mix in the stock pot. Your stock is now ready. Set aside.

Using a medium-sized frying pan, melt a knob of butter over a moderate heat and then add the mushrooms and thyme, cooking them whilst stirring, for 2 minutes. Throw the cooked mushrooms and thyme together with the cream into the food processor with the partridge. Season and then blend until smooth. If you are preparing in advance you can stick this in the fridge now until you are ready to finish off.

Layout your pasta sheets and using your cookie cutter, cut two circles from each sheet, producing 24 pasta circles. In the centre of 12 of them, place 1 heaped teaspoon of the mushroom/partridge mixture. Brush around the edges with water and then place another pasta circle on top of each and seal, producing 12 ravioli.

Pop a large pan of salted water on a high heat and bring to the boil.

Preheat your oven to 200c / 400f / gas 6.

In your frying pan, add to any left over juices, your splash of olive oil and half the knob of butter. Once hot, add the partridge breasts and cook skin-side down for 2 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a baking tray and pop in the oven for 5 minutes, skin-side up.

Returning to your frying pan, add a tiny bit more butter and once hot, chuck in the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Add the stock and cook for a further 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Meanwhile, add the ravioli to the boiling water and cook for 4-5 minutes or until they have floated to the top. Remove with your slotted spoon and put three on each plate.

Gradually stir the cream into the mushrooms and stock to create the delicious rich sauce. Transfer to a jug.

Retrieve the partridge breasts from the oven and add to the plates and then pour over the sauce. Garnish with thyme sprigs. Delicious! Serve either just as it is or maybe with some greenery, wilted spinach perhaps. Either way, your partridge with wild mushroom ravioli will be relished: rich, indulgent and absolutely lovely – enjoy!

Inspired by…

James Martin, Saturday Kitchen (I have reduced the amount of butter he is renowned for using!)

How easy…

Really easy if you don’t go down the route of making your own pasta!

 

Cold-Defying Hot Toddy

This recipe was passed on to me many years ago by the mother of a friend who presented me with a steaming mug of her cold-defying hot toddy having witnessed my red, inflamed nostrils and watery eyes as well as having to put up with the infernal coughing and sneezing that goes with a very average but miserable British cold. She swore by this comforting antidote and now so do I. The way its benefits were described to me are as follows: the honey eases your sore throat, the lemon provides a zap of vitamin C and the whisky, well, that helps you sleep (although John says that it means you just don’t care how rough you feel!!!). Ideally, consumed just before bedtime, I also reckon that it sweats out the cold whilst you are blissfully snoozing. All I can tell you is that I wake up the next morning well rested, soothed and the with the pesky cold on its way out of the door (a couple more nights of the same treatment may be required!)

Serves 1 poor mortal

What you need…

1 decent sized mug

60ml whisky (nothing expensive)

1 chunky slice lemon (maybe 1cm wide)

1 dessertspoon runny honey

Boiling water

What to do…

Pour your measure of whisky into the bottom of the mug – the amount is obviously personal. Add your honey, leaving the spoon in the mug. Pop in the lemon. Top up with boiling water and stir to dissolve the honey. Then use the tip of the spoon to ‘stab’ the lemon, extracting as much juice out of it as possible.

Pad upstairs to bed, snuggle under the duvet and then drink your hot toddy as soon as you can – it needs to be as hot as you can stand it. Enjoy its soothing properties and then switch out the bedside light and cuddle up for a good night’s sleep. This is possibly the very best part of having a cold!

Inspired by…

Margaret

How easy…

Well, it’s not hard is it?! And it minimises suffering.

 

 

Teriyaki Tuna with Asian-Inspired Salad

This dish was a total revelation: clearly erring on the healthy side, I was unsure whether it would be enjoyable but something piqued my interest so I gave it a go anyway. Absolutely stunning, like REALLY special. The marinated fish together with the zingy, fresh salad go together perfectly. Our taste buds had an absolute party with the distinct but complementary flavours and we kept delving in for more. Don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients – most of them make up the marinade and salad dressing, which are prepared waaaay in advance. Go for it: healthy and delicious!

Serves 2

What you need…

for the teriyaki tuna and marinade

2 x 200g fresh tuna steaks, about 2cm thick

60ml soy sauce (or Tamari if you would prefer gluten-free)

30ml sake

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated

1 tablespoon clear honey

1 banana shallot, chopped

Splash rapeseed oil

1 red pepper, seeded and finely sliced

200ml water

for the salad

100g baby spinach

1 red chicory head, leaves torn

Handful of mint leaves, torn

Handful of coriander, chopped

for the salad dressing

1 lime, juice only

2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

1 dessertspoon fresh ginger, grated

1 tablespoon palm sugar

2 tablespoons fish sauce

3 tablespoons soy sauce (or Tamari if you would prefer gluten-free)

1 red chilli, finely chopped

1 tablespoon mint leaves, chopped

1 tablespoon coriander leaves, chopped

What to do…

Put all your salad dressing ingredients into a screw-topped jar, tighten the lid and shake vigorously until mixed thoroughly together.

In a large pretty bowl, chuck in all your salad leaves, cover with cling film and pop in the fridge.

To make the marinade, tip all the ingredients except the fish, red pepper and water into a bowl and whisk them together until the sugar has dissolved. Pop the tuna steaks into a shallow dish and pour over the marinade. Cover and leave to marinate in the fridge for several hours, turning once.

The three steps above can be prepared in the morning and then happily ignored until just before you want to eat.

At that point, take the salad out of the fridge to come to room temperature.

Heat the oil in a large frying pan and when very hot, add the tuna steaks (leaving the marinade to one side) and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, depending on their thickness. Remember, tuna is best served nearer the raw state than overcooked, when it is dry and tough. Lift the tuna from the pan and keep warm.

Add the red pepper to the pan and stir-fry quickly. Add the marinade and water and bring to the boil. Continue boiling until it becomes thin but syrupy.

Tip your salad dressing over the salad leaves and toss together. Put the bowl in the middle of the table so that you can help yourselves to as much as you want.

Using a slotted spoon, lift the pepper slices from the pan and use them to garnish your tuna. Serve the remaining sauce separately. Healthy but unbelievably tasty, teriyaki tuna with Asian-inspired salad is a lovely, light but lively supper dish to be enjoyed regularly!

Tip…

You can marinate the tuna overnight if that fits into your plans better: the flavours just gather more.

Inspired by…

Mary Berry, Cook Now, Eat Later

How easy…

Really easy. You just need to remember to allow the marinating time.

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