Main Courses

Mirin-Glazed Salmon

The 67th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this salmon dish is fast and fabulous – perfect for a quick but lovely supper.

You can tell the summer holiday season is upon us: my recipes are leaning towards fast but tasty family suppers. This one is lovely – I’m a salmon fan anyway, but this recipe, with its dark, sweet and salty glaze, gives the fish a whole different persona: the humble salmon is sensationally transformed into a dish that at once combines being sweet, savoury, tender and crisp – delicious!

Serves 4

What you need…

60ml mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)

50g light brown sugar

60ml soy sauce

4 x 125g chunky salmon fillets

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

2 spring onions, sliced

What to do…

In a shallow dish, mix together the mirin, sugar and soy sauce until the sugar has dissolved. Pop in the salmon fillets and marinate for 3 minutes on the first side before flipping them and marinating them for a further 3 minutes on the other side. Meanwhile, heat a large frying pan on a high heat.

Dry-fry the salmon for 2 minutes. Flip them over, pour over the marinade and cook for a further 2 minutes. They will be only just cooked – perfect for this recipe – but you can leave them in for another minute or so if you’d prefer.

Using a fish slice, remove the salmon from the pan and onto a serving dish. Add the rice vinegar to the pan and warm through – a couple of minutes, maximum.

Pour the simply yummy glaze over the salmon and scatter over the spring onions. Voilà! That’s it – so fast, so easy and so damned tasty!

Tip…

If you have any fish leftover, pop it into the fridge and serve cold the next day with salad – fantastic. This was our plan, but Connagh elected to have seconds instead – plan dashed!

Serving suggestion…

Basmati and wild rice goes really well. I also sautéed some pre-boiled broccoli with sliced button mushrooms in chilli and garlic – adding a splash of mirin and soy sauce at the end – really lovely!

Inspired by…

Nigella Lawson

How easy…

So, so easy, so so fast, so so delicious!

 

Salmon with Sorrel and Vermouth Sauce

The 63rd of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is an fabulous way of dressing up salmon and after trying it, sorrel has a permanent spot in our garden and on our summer menus!

This is a simple dish but the flavour of the sauce is absolutely incredible – on first tasting my words were, “ Oh wow, I wish I’d made more!’ I love salmon and I’m always looking for different ways of preparing it: this is going to be a regular – such a treat!

Serves 2

What you need…

1 x baking tray, covered in foil

200g salmon fillet, cut into 2cm-thick slices

1 shallot, chopped finely

75ml vermouth

75ml dry white wine

150ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper

50g sorrel leaves, sliced finely

Your favourite salad leaves (I like a mix of iceberg, basil, rocket and chicory)

House dressing (see below)

for the house dressing

1 egg yolk

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons runny honey

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

150ml rapeseed oil

1 shallot, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 tablespoon flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

1 tablespoon mint leaves, finely chopped

1 tablespoon basil leaves, finely chopped

1 tablespoon thyme leaves, finely chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

First, knock up the fabulous salad dressing: place the egg yolk in a bowl with the mustard, honey and cider vinegar. Use an electric handheld whisk to beat together. Then, gradually add the oil, whisking the whole time, until the mixture is thick and creamy. Add the remaining ingredients, seasoning to taste, whisk to thoroughly incorporate and then pour into a screw top jar and pop in the fridge until needed.

When you’re about ready to eat, pop your salmon slices on the foil and set aside.

Heat a medium saucepan until hot and then tip in the shallot, vermouth and white wine, cooking for about 5 minutes until reduced by half. Add the cream and cook for 2-3 minutes until reduced and thickened.

Meanwhile, pop your salmon under the grill for 3 minutes, until just cooked through.  Chuck all your salad leaves into a serving bowl.

Season the sauce to taste and then stir in the sorrel leaves. Divide the sauce between 2 plates and then place salmon slices on the top.

Drizzle some house dressing over the salad leaves and toss to thoroughly coat. Serve salad alongside the fabulous salmon and sauce. Absolutely fabulous!

Tips…

The only finicky element to this recipe is the preparation of the delightful salad dressing so I prepared mine in advance and chucked it all in a screw top jar to be kept in the fridge. The quantity made is double what is required so the remainder can be used for another salad – the dressing will keep in the fridge for a few days.

I struggled to find sorrel in supermarkets, but it’s dead easy to grow in the garden and has a lovely, unique fresh, slightly lemony flavour that’s great raw in salads.

Inspired by…

James Martin

How easy…

Once the salad dressing was sorted, dead easy and dead quick…and fabulously delicious!

Taste-Bud Dazzling Quick Thai Curry Feast

The 61st of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this feisty feast visits our kitchen table a couple of times a year and is always welcome. Just looking at the recipe now, I feel another Thai night coming on soon!

Fiery hot but oh-so flavoursome, these curries and the accompanying noodles dazzle the taste buds with the different flavours but the heat of the chillies is perfectly counter-balanced by the cooling, soothing coconut milk and coriander so that you can enjoy this lovely supper without feeling like your mouth is on fire. A definite favourite which uses lots of store-cupboard ingredients, is really quick and can mostly be prepared in advance – what’s not to like?!

What you need…

for the red chicken curry

Splash of rapeseed oil

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 x 90g jar red Thai curry paste (I prefer Bart Infusions)

1 x 400ml can coconut milk

4 chicken breasts, skinned and cut into bite-sized pieces

125ml chicken stock

2 tablespoons fish sauce

4 dried kaffir lime leaves

A large handful of coriander, chopped and red chilli, deseeded and sliced, to garnish

for the green beef curry

1 aubergine, peeled and cubed

2 onions, peeled and sliced

Splash of rapeseed oil

1 x 90g jar green Thai curry paste (as above, I prefer Bart Infusions)

500g lean beef (fillet if you’re feeling flush) cut into thin strips

1 x 400g can coconut milk

2 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon brown sugar

2 dried red chillies, finely sliced

2.5cm ginger root, grated

4 dried kaffir lime leaves

A large handful of basil leaves, torn up, to garnish

for the sesame hot noodles

2 tablespoons rapeseed oil

1 tablespoon sesame seed oil

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 tablespoon smooth peanut butter

1 dried red chilli, finely sliced

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

3 tablespoons light soy sauce

Juice of 1 large lime

Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

1 large handful coriander, chopped

400g medium egg noodles

What to do…

Red Chicken Curry: heat the oil to moderate in a large pan or wok. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Tip in the curry paste and cook for 10-15 seconds, then gradually add the coconut milk, stirring the whole time. Add the chicken pieces and cook over a gentle heat for 5 minutes.

Stir in the stock, fish sauce and kaffir lime leaves. Cook for a further 2 minutes. Check the chicken is cooked all the way through. Turn off the heat, pop on a lid and set aside until you’re nearly ready to eat.  Reheat and garnish with the coriander and chilli – fabulous.

Green Beef Curry: blanch the aubergine cubes and onion slices in boiling water for 2 minutes to soften. Drain.

Heat the oil to moderate in a large pan or wok, add the curry paste and cook for 1 minute, stirring continuously.

Whop up the heat to high, tip in the beef and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, fish sauce and sugar and bring to the boil, stirring the whole time.

Add the aubergine, onion, chillies, ginger and lime leaves and cook for a further 2 minutes. Turn off the heat, pop on a lid and set aside until you’re nearly ready to eat. Reheat and garnish with basil – yummy!

Noodle Time: in a large screw-top jar, chuck in the oils, garlic and peanut butter. Pop the lid on and shake like mad to fully mix together. Add everything else except the noodles and coriander. Pop the lid back on and shake like mad again. Set aside until you’re about ready to serve.

Cook the noodles according to the packet (mine take 4 minutes in boiling, salted water). Drain and tip them into a warmed serving dish. Shake the ‘dressing’ one more time and pour over the noodles. Toss together like you would a salad to make sure that all the noodles are amply covered with the lovely dressing. Garnish with coriander and serve with your piping hot curries. Such a joy!

Tip…

Once the curries are cooked, you can keep them in the fridge for up to 24 hours before reheating them to serve. Doing so encourages the flavours to develop and also means less work in the kitchen whilst your friends are around if this is a supper you are sharing. Always a good shout: cook ahead, eat relaxed!

Inspired by…

Carol Bowen (from a very old book)

How easy…

Dead easy, you can cook ahead and this supper is absolutely fabulous!

Partridge with Wild Mushroom Ravioli

The 55th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this dish exudes opulence but is easy to make and a real winter treat.

This is a proper winter indulgence: the rich sauce and delicious partridge perfectly contrasted by the lightness of the ravioli, packed with intense flavour. The first time I made this, I used a pasta machine to make my own pasta and whilst it wasn’t hard, it was messy, time-consuming and quite tricky to deal with the ever-lengthening pasta strips and to get them to the necessary thinness (thick pasta is not great). So, on the basis that life’s too short, I’ve replaced that process with the use of ready-made pasta – it’s a lot easier unless you are a perfectionist with either a lot of time on your hands and a love of clearing up or an absolute whizz with the pasta machine! Given that change, this dish is lovely, indulgent and really quite quick to knock up!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 partridges (ask your butcher to separate and de-bone the breasts from the rest of the birds)

2 small carrots, peeled, topped and tailed

1 onion, peeled and quartered

1 bay leaf

for the ravioli

1 x cookie cutter, 7-8cms wide

12 fresh lasagne sheets

Knob of butter

100g wild/mixed mushrooms

3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves picked

150ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning

for the sauce

1 beef stock pot (I use Knorr)

Splash olive oil

Knob of butter

250g wild/mixed mushrooms

100ml double cream

A few sprigs thyme, to garnish

What to do…

Remove your lasagne sheets from the fridge to come to room temperature.

Separate the partridge breasts from the rest of the birds, leaving the breasts in the fridge for now. Cut from the remaining partridge carcass whatever meat you can get and pop it into your food processor – we’ll get back to that later.

To enhance your sauce, make a quick stock: take a medium saucepan and chuck in the remaining partridge carcass, carrots, onion and bay leaf, season and cover with water. Bring to the boil, cover and then simmer for 20 minutes. Sieve the ‘stock’ into a jug, retaining just 200ml (chuck the rest) and then, using a small balloon whisk, mix in the stock pot. Your stock is now ready. Set aside.

Using a medium-sized frying pan, melt a knob of butter over a moderate heat and then add the mushrooms and thyme, cooking them whilst stirring, for 2 minutes. Throw the cooked mushrooms and thyme together with the cream into the food processor with the partridge. Season and then blend until smooth. If you are preparing in advance you can stick this in the fridge now until you are ready to finish off.

Layout your pasta sheets and using your cookie cutter, cut two circles from each sheet, producing 24 pasta circles. In the centre of 12 of them, place 1 heaped teaspoon of the mushroom/partridge mixture. Brush around the edges with water and then place another pasta circle on top of each and seal, producing 12 ravioli.

Pop a large pan of salted water on a high heat and bring to the boil.

Preheat your oven to 200c / 400f / gas 6.

In your frying pan, add to any left over juices, your splash of olive oil and half the knob of butter.  Once hot, add the partridge breasts and cook skin-side down for 2 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a baking tray and pop in the oven for 5 minutes, skin-side up.

Returning to your frying pan, add a tiny bit more butter and once hot, chuck in the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Add the stock and cook for a further 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Meanwhile, add the ravioli to the boiling water and cook for 4-5 minutes or until they have floated to the top. Remove with your slotted spoon and put three on each plate.

Gradually stir the cream into the mushrooms and stock to create the delicious rich sauce. Transfer to a jug.

Retrieve the partridge breasts from the oven and add to the plates and then pour over the sauce. Garnish with thyme sprigs. Delicious! Serve either just as it is or maybe with some greenery, wilted spinach perhaps. Either way, your partridge with wild mushroom ravioli will be relished: rich, indulgent and absolutely lovely – enjoy!

Inspired by…

James Martin, Saturday Kitchen (I have reduced the amount of butter he is renowned for using!)

How easy…

Really easy if you don’t go down the route of making your own pasta!

 

Luscious Baked Lamb with Rosemary and a Redcurrant and Mint Sauce

The 47th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this recipe belongs to the late summer when the foil-baking ensures the lamb retains its lusciousness!

This is a gorgeous summer Sunday roast recipe. The lamb ends up soft, sweet and juicy and the sweet, tart, piquant sauce is a perfect foil for this delicious joint.

Serves 6

What you need…

1.8 – 2 kg leg of lamb

2 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves plus 3 further sprigs

1 clove garlic

1 tablesp olive oil

½ teaspoon rock salt

Black pepper

for the sauce

3 tablespoons redcurrant jelly

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

4 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

Sea salt and black pepper

for the gravy

275ml dry white wine

Lamb stock cube

Chicken gravy granules

1 dessertspoon/tablespoon redcurrant jelly

Milk

Dash of double cream

What to do…

Crush together the garlic and rock salt to a purée in a pestle and mortar. Add the oil, chopped rosemary and season with salt and pepper.

Spread out a sheet of foil over a large roasting tin, placing the lamb on it. Stab the fleshy parts of the joint several times with a skewer. Now, spread the rosemary mixture all over the upper surface of the lamb and tuck in the sprigs of rosemary – it makes a nice garnish later.

Bring the edges of the foil up over the lamb, make a pleat at the top and scrunch the ends. This foil parcel should be fairly loose to allow the air to circulate. Bake the lamb for 2 hours, then open out the foil, base the joint well with the juices and return it to the oven for a further 30 minutes to brown. The above cooking time should produce the lamb very slightly pink – you can cook it for more or less time if you would prefer.

Meanwhile, make the sauce by combining the redcurrant jelly and vinegar in a small saucepan and whisking over a gentle heat till the jelly melts into the vinegar (a small balloon whisk does this perfectly). Add the chopped mint and some seasoning and pour into a serving jug – the sauce doesn’t need to be warm.

When the lamb is cooked, remove it from the oven and allow it to rest for 20 minutes before carving. Whilst it is resting, spoon out the juices into a jug to make the gravy. Skim the fat off the top of the juices and put the remainder in a saucepan with the white wine. Stir and let it bubble until the gravy becomes syrupy. Add the stock cube for taste and then enough chicken granules to achieve the right consistency. Increase the depth of flavour with the redcurrant jelly. Taste. If it’s too sharp, add a little milk. For added richness, chuck in a dash of double cream.

Serve lamb, sauces and gravy with dauphinoise potatoes and a spring/summer vegetables. Enjoy!

Inspired by…

Delia Smith

How easy…

It’s one of those lazy Sunday dishes that pretty much takes care of itself.

 

 

 

 

 

Grilled Plaice with Mustard and Tarragon Sauce, Asparagus and Peas

The 43rd of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is an absolutely superb fish supper, with every mouthful to be savoured!

This is a really lovely, delicate and light fish supper. The sauce is quite piquant and, when tasted on its own, really rather strong. But, take a forkful that includes a little fish, greenery and sauce and the combination is fabulous: the sauce is the perfect foil for the delicate fish – it just all works brilliantly. And – bonus – you can make the sauce ahead, leaving just a few minutes cooking of the fish and vegetables just before you want to eat. It’s on the ‘favourites’ list for me!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking tray

500g asparagus, trimmed

100g frozen peas, defrosted

1.5kg plaice, filleted and cut into portions

Splash rapeseed oil

1 baby gem lettuce, shredded

Small knob of butter

Sea salt and black pepper, for seasoning

Olive oil to drizzle

for the sauce

½ fish stockpot (I use Knorr)

100ml boiling water from the kettle

Splash rapeseed oil

2 shallots, peeled and chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

100ml dry, still cider

2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard

100ml double cream

4 teaspoons chopped tarragon, stalks reserved

2 teaspoons capers

What to do…

First, blanch the asparagus. Pop in a deep frying pan of boiling, salted water and simmer vigorously for 2 minutes. Drain and set aside. Dry the frying pan – you’ll be using it again later.

In a jug, create your fish stock by pouring the water from your kettle into a jug and dissolving in the fish stockpot, using a small balloon to whisk. Set aside.

Now to the sauce: heat a splash of rapeseed oil in a pan over a moderate heat. Add the shallots and garlic and cook for 1 minute.  Add the cider vinegar and bring to the boil. Pour in the cider and fish stock and bubble furiously until the stock is reduced by half.  Add the mustard, cream and tarragon stalks and simmer, reducing and thickening the sauce so that it coats the back of a spoon.  Remove the tarragon stalks and discard. Stir in the capers and chopped tarragon. Set aside.

When you’re about ready to eat, preheat your grill to medium and oil your baking tray. Sprinkle salt all over the tray and lay your fish fillets on top, skin side up. Place under the grill and cook for 6 minutes, checking the last minute or two to avoid overcooking.

Meanwhile, put your sauce back on a very gentle heat, just to keep it warm.

Return to your frying pan and splash in the rapeseed oil. When hot, add the lettuce and wilt for 1 minute. Add the asparagus and peas with the knob of butter and warm through for a couple of minutes. Season to taste.

Remove the fish from the grill and leave to rest for a couple of minutes.

To serve, arrange the greenery on warmed plates and place the fish on top, skin side up. Drizzle with a little olive oil and then spoon the sauce around the fish. Don’t attack – it’s to be savoured but remember to get a little bit of everything on each forkful and enjoy the combined flavours – simply lovely!

Tips…

If you can’t get fresh tarragon, chuck in a teaspoon of dried tarragon at the same time as the shallots and garlic.

I have oven-roasted the fish rather than grilling it (we have a temperamental grill) and it’s just as good – check after 6 minutes and maybe cook a wee bit longer.

I have used sea bass fillets when I couldn’t get plaice – lovely.

Inspired by…

Chef, Nathan Outlaw and my bro, who insisted that I couldn’t do this blog without this Nathan Outlaw book in my collection – good call, Martin!

How easy…

Really, really easy and a pleasure to make!

My Favourite Chicken Marinade

The 42nd of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this one is primarily for BBQ season which I know isn’t quite upon us yet….but it’s always  good to be prepared!

I’ve been doing this marinade for years and everyone who has ever tried it has requested the recipe so I thought I’d share. We used it this time to marinade whole chicken breasts before barbecuing them. But on other occasions, I’ve cut the chicken into chunks and fried the chicken in its marinade before adding it warm to a salad of leaves, avocado and bacon. Either way, its lovely: the chicken is succulent and has a rich, almost caramelised flavour – not too sweet but just rather gorgeous – it elevates the simple chicken breast into something much more enticing, if I don’t say so myself! Give it a go!

Serves 4

What you need…

4 skinless chicken breasts

2 tablespoons dark brown soft sugar

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

3 tablespoons soy sauce/tamari (for gluten-free)

2 cloves garlic, chopped

What to do…

Score the chicken breasts lightly to enable the marinade to permeate the meat.

Mix all the marinade ingredients together in a bowl until the sugar dissolves. Add the chicken breasts, give them a quick stir, cover with cling film and leave to marinate for 30 minutes.

Remove the chicken breasts from the marinade with a slotted spoon and barbecue until cooked all the way through.

Serve and enjoy! It really is lovely.

Inspired by…

I have no idea where the marinade came from but ‘thank you’ to whoever came up with the combination!

How easy…

I marinate, John barbecues – dead easy!

Hunter’s Chicken

The 38th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is a lovely homely recipe, perfect for the weekend, that has the added joy of filling the kitchen with a fantastic aroma of garlic and rosemary whilst cooking!

A real homely, rustic Italian-inspired casserole, this is perfect for the dreary post-Christmas period or equally, lovely crisp Autumnal days. Hearty and flavoursome, the dish really benefits from the addition of anchovies, which just add a real depth of flavour rather than anything fishy and there is something gloriously comforting about the aroma of garlic filling the kitchen as this recipe for Hunter’s Chicken cooks itself: it’s a regular in our house!

What you need…

2kg chicken thigh fillets

Sea salt and black pepper

8 bay leaves

4 sprigs of rosemary

4 fat garlic cloves, chopped

¾ bottle Chianti red wine

Plain flour, for dusting

Rapeseed oil

6 anchovy fillets, roughly chopped

A handful of pitted black olives

2 x 400g tins of chopped tomatoes

What to do…

The evening before you want to indulge in this lovely casserole, tip the rosemary, bay leaves, 2 cloves of the garlic, chicken and Chianti into a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper, stir it all together, cover and pop into the fridge over night, allowing the flavours to develop.

The next day, preheat your oven to 180˚C / 350˚F / gas 4. Use a slotted spoon to remove the chicken from the marinade. Set the marinade aside and then pat dry the chicken pieces on kitchen paper.

In a carrier bag, chuck in flour, salt and pepper and then the chicken thighs. Twist the top of the carrier bag tight and shake the contents, ensuring that flour and seasoning dust all of each of the chicken pieces.

Heat a splash of the oil over a moderate heat in a big frying pan. Fry the chicken pieces until browned lightly all over. Put into an ovenproof casserole together with the rosemary and bay leaves from the marinade and set side.

Using the same frying pan, add another splash of oil and gently fry the remaining garlic cloves with the anchovies until the garlic is just turning golden and the anchovies are starting to break up. Add the tomatoes, olives and marinade. Bring to the boil and transfer to your casserole dish, submerging the chicken pieces in this lovely sauce.

Cover with a double thickness of foil or a lid and pop in the oven for 1 hour.

Serve with some form of greenery and perhaps potato. We however, like great doorstops of fresh, warm bread or focaccia (see recipe) to mop up the delicious sauce. Oh, and don’t forget more Chianti to accompany this fine rustic dish! Very yummy.

Inspired by…

Jamie Oliver

How easy…

Really easy and absolutely delicious,

 

 

 

Flaming Good Pan-Fried Pork Fillet with Prune and Armagnac Cream Sauce

The 34th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is a stunning little dinner number, ideal to ‘wow’ your family and friends and best of all, it takes very little effort.

It is only since I have been doing this blog, that I’ve tried the odd pork recipe – seriously, never cooked it and rarely eaten it beforehand. I have however become a total convert – this dish (and the pulled pork recipe) seal it! This dish is absolutely stunning – unbelievably quick and easy as well as tasting out of this world. The pork is delightful but it is the sauce of Armagnac, prunes and cream that creates the sensation that is this dish. Try it – it won’t be the last time! Simply delish!

Serves 4

What you need…

16 semi-dried prunes

Armagnac

1 650g pork tenderloin fillet, cut into 1 cm slices

Sea salt and black pepper

Knob of butter

150ml double cream

What to do…

The night before you want to enjoy this dish, pop the prunes into a screw-top jar and pour in Armagnac until they are just covered. With a fork, squish the prunes down into the Armagnac. Put the lid on and leave overnight to allow the intermingling flavours to develop.

For the meal, drain the prunes through a sieve, collecting the Armagnac in jug. Chop the prunes into quarters. Set aside.

Place the slices of pork onto a board and use a meat mallet or rolling pin to flatten them out into thin slices. Season with salt and pepper.

Heat a frying pan until hot, melt the butter and then add the slices of pork, frying on each side for 1 – 2 minutes or until golden and just cooked through. You will need to do this in batches so have a warmed dish ready for the cooked pork.

Once all the pork is cooked and in the warmed dish, add the Armagnac to the pan and carefully flambé the Armagnac (the first time I did this,  the flames were HUGE so be careful – they last for just a few seconds – pouring the Armagnac in slowly helps with the health and safety issues!) Once the flames have dissipated, add the prunes and cook for 2 minutes, mashing them gently with the back of a spoon.

Add the cream, season with salt and pepper and cook for a further minute.  Serve the pork slices and pour over the decadent sauce and then…enjoy every morsel. That’s it – so simple and this dish is absolutely terrific – it tastes like you’ve spent hours in the kitchen rather than just a few moments! Really fabulous!

Serving suggestions…

Sauté potatoes go well and we enjoyed ours with roasted cauliflower.

Inspired by…

James Martin

How easy…

Dead easy – you just need to remember to create your drunken prunes the night before!

 

 

Miso-Marinated Cod with Stir-Fry

 

The 32nd of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this lovely supper dish is quite simply fast and fabulous!

A great mid-week family supper that is super-quick to make and has stunning Umami-ish flavours – tangy, tantalising and tasty; it’s gently spicy rather than powerfully hot and so good that I’ve had it three times in two weeks!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking tray, lined with foil

4 x bamboo skewers

650g skinless cod/haddock fillets, cut into cubes

4 spring onions, trimmed and sliced

4cm ginger, peeled and sliced thinly

1 teaspoon dried, crushed chillis

2 x 300g packs of your favourite vegetable stir-fry

1 tablespoon rapeseed oil

2 tablespoon hoisin sauce

2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce

Sea salt and black pepper

Lime wedges, to serve (optional)

for the marinade

2 tablespoon miso paste

4 tablespoons maple syrup

2 tablespoons mirin

4 tablespoons light soy sauce

Juice of 1 lime

What to do…

First to the marinade: combine all the ingredients in a bowl, season with a little black pepper. Add the fish, then cover and chill for anything between 15 minutes and overnight (I did an hour).

Preheat your oven to 200˚c / 400˚f / gas 6.

Thread the fish onto skewers, then arrange on your baking tray.

Drizzle a tablespoon of the remaining marinade over each skewer and pop into the oven until cooked though (10minutes) turning half way through cooking.

Heat the rapeseed oil in a large frying pan over a high heat. Add the spring onions, ginger and chilli and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Tip in the vegetables, hoisin and sweet chilli sauces and stir-fry for 5-6 minutes, or until just tender. Serve with the fish skewers and extra lime wedges for squeezing over. Absolutely delightful and prepared in minutes!

Inspired by…

Tesco.com

How easy…

Ridiculously!

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