Puddings and Cakes

Pistachio, Orange and Rosemary Biscotti

I was introduced to these gorgeous biscotti last September at a Macmillan coffee morning hosted by my lovely friend, Sue. Lots of scrumptious homemade cakes graced her table but it was the biscotti that I enjoyed the most. That very afternoon, I was on the email to request the recipe. It turns out that Sue’s son, Josh, had made the biscotti and on contacting him, I discovered that the recipe originated from 2012 Great British Bake Off winner, John Whaite. A perfect accompaniment to a good, strong cup of coffee, the combination of pistachio, orange and rosemary is simply exquisite and the recipe is so very, very easy. So, ‘thank you’ to Sue and Josh for the recipe and for prompting me to buy the John Whaite Bakes cookery book. Try these biscotti – best shared with friends.

Makes 20ish

What you need…

125g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

75g caster sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

Zest of 1 large orange

50g dried apricots, roughly chopped

80g pistachios, roughly chopped

1 sprig rosemary, finely chopped

1 egg

1 tablespoon milk

What to do…

Preheat oven to 180°c / 350°f / gas 4.

Into your food processor tip the flour, sugar, baking powder, orange zest, apricots, pistachios and rosemary. Whizz until all the ingredients are evenly mixed.

Beat the egg and milk together and then add to the other ingredients. Whizz again until a dough is formed. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and give the dough a quick knead to bring it all together and roll it out to form a long, fat sausage, maybe 23cms in length.

Place on a baking sheet lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper and then pop in the oven to bake for 25 minutes or until light golden brown.

Remove from the oven and, using a really sharp serrated knife, cut into 1cm-thick slices. Pop back in the oven and reduce the temperature to 130°c / 250°f / gas ½ and bake for a further 15 minutes.

Allow to cool completely on a wire rack. Then make yourself a lovely strong coffee and sit back and enjoy these delicious, crunchy biscotti – just yummy and very moreish!

Biscotti close up w

Inspired by…

Josh initially and then John Whaite

How easy…

Dead easy. Got up, showered. Made biscotti. Had coffee. Lovely morning!

 

 

Baked Lemon Pudding

Returning from the gorgeous Amalfi Coast where lemon trees seemed to adorn every hillside, heavily laden with ripened fruit, I was inspired to do something with lemons. It is however, not yet warm enough to do a lemon sorbet or something naughty with the mildly addictive and delicious Italian lemon liqueur, Limoncello (both of these things are coming though, I promise) but I happened on this pudding recipe which manages to combine being oh so very, very light, fluffy and zesty with being gently comforting. Delving my spoon into the ‘still warm from the oven’ loveliness that is baked lemon pudding, the grey English skies didn’t seem so dreary after all. It’s also beyond easy and took next to no effort – perfect for the first day blogging after a week’s pampering. Give it a go!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

1 x 1 litre ovenproof dish, lightly buttered

1 x deep roasting tin

Kettle of boiling water

90g unsalted butter, cut into cubes

130g caster sugar

3 large eggs, separated

Zest and juice of 2 unwaxed lemons

30g plain flour

200ml milk

What to do…

Preheat the oven to 190° c / 375°f / gas 5.

Using an electric hand held whisk, beat the egg whites in a bowl until stiff and glossy. Set aside.

Chuck into your food processor the butter and sugar and whizz until softened and pale in colour. Add the egg yolks, one at a time, fully incorporating each one before adding the next. Keep whizzing and add the lemon zest and then the flour. Still whizzing, slowly tip in the lemon juice and then the milk – it will be a really sloshy mixture – don’t worry.

Tip the sloshy mixture into the egg whites and, using a balloon whisk, very gently fold the two together.

Carefully pour the mixture into your ovenproof dish and put the dish in the roasting tin. Pour boiling water into the roasting tin until it’s about 2cm deep. Pop the whole lot into the oven and bake for 35 – 45 minutes or until it’s golden brown (I left mine in for 40 minutes so whilst the inside tasted sublime, the top was a bit too dark – ovens vary!)

Cool slightly before serving this deliciously easy, light and tangy lemon pud. Enjoy!

Inspired by…

delicious magazine

How easy…

Very, very easy and a complete joy!

Easter Simnel Cake

The Christmas cake was finished a long time ago so along comes Easter with the opportunity to create this lovely, richly-flavoured, moist fruit cake with its two layers of marzipan: one in the middle – which really adds to the cake’s moistness – and one on the top which is toasted. The marzipan top is decorated with 11 marzipan balls, representing the 11 true disciples of Jesus (minus Judas), with the larger 12th ball in the middle representing Jesus himself. The cake is definitely a celebration and should take pride of place for Easter tea! Really easy to make if you have an electric stand mixer!

Makes a 23cm cake

What you need…

Ideally, an electric stand mixer (I have a Kenwood K-Mix) otherwise a robust wooden spoon and a lot of strength to mix by hand!)

1 x 23cm round spring form cake tin, lightly buttered and lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper

for the marzipan

500g ground almonds

250g caster sugar

250g icing sugar, plus extra for dusting

2 eggs

½ teaspoon almond essence

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon lemon juice

for the cake

1kg raisins

175g glacé cherries

50g ground almonds

125g currants

300g plain flour

1 teaspoon grated nutmeg

½ teaspoon mixed spice

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

300g soft margarine (I used Stork)

300g caster sugar

6 eggs

1-2 tablespoons brandy, your choice!

Apricot jam, melted, for glazing

What to do…

First, make the marzipan and I’m going to assume a mixer is to hand – this would be hard work otherwise! Fit the mixer with its dough hook. Tip all the marzipan ingredients into the bowl and mix it together on a slow speed until it comes together into smooth dough. Set aside.

Preheat the oven to 140°c / 275° f / gas 1.

Wash and dry the mixer bowl and return it to the machine. Fit the ‘K paddle’ (beater attachment).

Into the bowl, tip the raisins, cherries, almonds and currants into the bowl and mix on a slow speed until all are evenly blended. Add the flour, nutmeg, mixed spice, cinnamon, margarine and sugar and again, mix on a slow speed until all evenly blended. Then drop in one egg at a time, whilst the mixer is still going and mix thoroughly before adding the next one. Finally, add the brandy and mix in.

Cut a little less than half of the marzipan and roll it out to about 1 cm thick on a work surface that has been lightly dusted with icing sugar. Use the base of your cake tin as a template to cut a circle out of the marzipan. Put the scraps with the rest of the marzipan, wrap tightly in cling film and pop in the fridge, ready for use after the cake is cooked and cooled.

Spoon half of the cake mix into your cake tin. Then, lay in the circle of marzipan. Then, top with the rest of the cake mixture. Pop in the oven and bake for 3 hours. Indulge in the fabulous smell that pervades the house!

Leave the cake to cool in the tin and then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

When it’s cold, roll out the rest of the marzipan as above and again cut out a circle the same size as the cake. Glaze the top of the cake with the warmed apricot jam and then lay the circle of marzipan on the top. Use the left over marzipan to create 11 balls of the same size and one bigger one. Brush the bottom of each ball with apricot jam and arrange the 11 balls around the edge of the top of the cake; placing the larger one in the middle. Then, to toast your Easter Simnel cake, either put it under a moderate grill – watch it like a hawk – it will brown quickly, or used a cook’s blowtorch for the job (much more fun!)

Your cake is now ready to take centre stage in your Easter tea celebrations (and, unless there’s a big crowd of you, for several days afterwards!) Moist, rich and a really, really lovely very proper cake! Enjoy!

Inspired by…

Lisa Faulkner

How easy…

It’s not difficult at all if you have an electric mixer – I wouldn’t want to make by hand!

The history of Simnel cake according to my Google search…

The Simnel cake is associated with Easter today, but was originally made for Mothering Sunday, the fourth Sunday in Lent. Originally Mothering Sunday was the day when the congregations of the daughter churches of a parish went to the mother church, usually an abbey, to give their offerings.

In the 17th century, Mothering Sunday became the day when girls and boys in service were allowed a day off to go and visit their mothers. This was their one and only holiday. The girls would bake their mothers a Simnel cake as a gift.

Simnel cakes have been baked since the middle ages and it is believed that the word Simnel comes from the Latin ‘Simila,’ which meant very fine flour made from wheat. Made properly, the cake would keep for a few weeks, thus the baking of a Simnel cake for Mothering Sunday was not only a gift from a girl to her mother, but also a test of the girl’s cooking skills. The cake would not be eaten until Easter Sunday, and the whole family would be anxious to see if the cake was still moist.

With the demise of service after the First World War, the Simnel cake began to be treated as an Easter cake in its own right. The cake is decorated with eleven marzipan balls, representing Jesus’ disciples minus Judas the traitor.

 

Easter Hot Cross Buns

These are Mary’s hot cross buns and they ARE gorgeous – really fruity and beautifully spiced with cinnamon and mixed spice. They look fab as well with the golden syrup glaze. I would recommend them but only if you’re having a relaxing day at home, enabling you the luxury of lots to time to revisit the kitchen several times. They’re not difficult, just take some time but very lovely and worth the time.

Makes 12 large buns or 18 medium-sized

What you need…

1 x electric mixer fitted with a dough hook!!!!

2 x baking sheets, lined with Bake O Glide/ baking paper

1 x piping bag fitted with a fine 3mm nozzle (for the crosses)

40g butter

300ml milk

500g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting

75g caster sugar

2 teaspoons mixed spice

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Grated zest of 1 lemon

10g salt

10g fast-action dried yeast

1 egg, beaten

200g sultanas

50g chopped candied peel

Olive oil for greasing

for the topping

75g plain flour

100ml water

2 tablespoons golden syrup

What to do…

In separate saucepans, gently melt the butter and also warm the milk, just to tepid.

Meanwhile, into your mixer, chuck the flour, sugar, spices, lemon zest, salt and yeast. Put the mixer onto a slow speed and blend the ingredients together.

Add the melted butter, half the warm milk and the egg and mix until all the ingredients are blended. Add a little milk at a time now and keep checking the blend – the dough needs to come together and be on the wet side, rather than dry. You might not need all the milk. I reckon I had about 50mls that was not required.

Once you’re happy with the dough, add in the sultanas and candied peel and let the mixer do its thing on a low speed for 10 minutes, at which point the dough will be silky and elastic. Turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface and give it a couple of kneads, just to get it into a ball shape.

Smear olive oil all around the inside of a nice roomy bowl, pop in your dough, cover with cling film and then leave it somewhere warm for 1½ hours or until doubled in size. (I put mine underneath the kitchen radiator).

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5 minutes. Return to the bowl, re-cover with cling film and leave in your chosen warm place for a further hour.

Turn the dough out again onto your floured surface and divide into 12 or 18 equal parts, depending on whether you want large or medium-sized buns. Shape each 1 into a ball and pop them onto the baking sheets, flattening them slightly.

Slip the baking sheets into a large polythene bag (I used large shopping bags) making sure that the bag doesn’t touch the buns – they’ll stick! Leave for a further hour until the buns have doubled in size.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 220°c / 425°f / gas 7.

To make the crosses, mix together the water and plain flour to make a paste; then spoon into the piping bag.

When the buns have risen, remove from the bags and pipe a cross on top of each one. Pop the buns in the oven bake for 15 – 20 minutes until pale golden brown (I overdid mine a bit!)

Finally, melt the golden syrup in a pan and, whilst the buns are still warm, brush the top of each one to give them a lovely – sticky – shine. Cool on a wire rack and then dig in to your Easter hot cross buns – they are lovely and worth the return trips to the kitchen!

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy…

They are not difficult at all, particularly if you have an electric mixer. But they do tie you to the house for quite a while so your schedule needs to be such that you can pop back into the kitchen to complete the 3 stages. Absolutely worth it if you have the time.

Heavenly Lemon Torte

 

This heavenly dessert is right up my street: ridiculously easy, tastes amazing and…doesn’t even require any cooking! Picture if you will a spoonful: the light and fluffy cream filling excites your taste buds with the gentle tanginess of lemon and then, the taste of chocolate follows through – absolutely delightful! The only other thing it needs is another spoonful and then another….Give it a go!

Serves 10 – 12 depending on how generously you cut your slices!

What you need…

for the base

1 x 20cm round spring form baking tin, lightly buttered and lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper

300g dark chocolate digestive biscuits

50g butter, melted

2 tablespoons double cream

for the filling

300ml double cream

265g condensed milk (2/3 of a standard 397g tin)

Lemon juice from 2 large or 3 small lemons

Zest of 1 large lemon

What to do…

Roughly break up your chocolate digestives, shove them in the food processor and whizz until they are crumbs. Remove the processor blade and then, using a spatula, mix in the melted butter and cream.

Press evenly into the bottom of your baking tin. Pop into the fridge whilst you prepare the filling.

Using a handheld electric whisk, whip the cream until it’s quite stiff and then, using a large balloon whisk, gently fold in the condensed milk, lemon juice and zest. Tip the lot onto the chocolate digestive base and return to the fridge to chill for at least 1 hour before serving. That’s it!!!

To serve, remove from the tin (I normally leave my puds on the base part of the spring form tin for fear of imminent collapse if it was removed) and gently peel away the Bake O Glide from the sides. Decorate with a little peeled lemon rind if you like and then just cut yourself your first – but most certainly not your last – slice of heavenly lemon torte – just yummy!

Inspired by…

The filling came from a Tim Siadatan recipe, but the base is attributed to Rachel Allen.

How easy…

It’s just a bit of mucking about really! And no cooking!

 

 

 

 

Black Velvet Baby Cakes

Never one to miss an opportunity to make cake, today I am presented with St. Patrick’s Day and in celebration made these lovely cakes that are spectacularly easy and fast to whip up as well as being indulgently delicious! They also bring together that wonderful combination of Guinness and Champagne! The dark, rich and quite dense sponge contrasts perfectly with the light, frothy, sweet cream, emulating the famous cocktail perfectly. The serving suggestion is to accompany these cakes with a glass of Champagne, but it’s a tad early for that – they work equally well with a cup of good, strong coffee – indulge and enjoy!

Makes 6

What you need…

6 x dariole moulds, well buttered and bases lined with parchment paper

100g butter, room temperature, cut into chunks

175g light brown soft sugar

1 egg

100g self-raising flour

50g ground almonds

½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

5 tablespoons cocoa, plus a little extra for decorating

150ml Guinness

for the cream topping

200ml double cream

25g icing sugar

Splash Champagne

What to do…

Preheat the oven to 180°c /350°f / gas 4.

Chuck the butter, sugar, egg, flour, almonds, bicarbonate, cocoa and Guinness into your food processor and whizz until lump-free. Divide the mixture evenly between the dariole moulds, pop them on a baking tray and stick them in the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until risen and a skewer poked in comes out clean.

Cool for 15 minutes and then remove them from their tins (see tip) and cool completely, keeping them the same way up – no need to invert.

Using a handheld electric whisk, whip the cream together with the icing sugar and Champagne until nice and thick and simply dollop on top of your cakes. Serve your fabulous black velvet baby cakes with a glass or two of Champagne – what could be nicer?! Thank you St. Patrick!

Tip…

No matter how thoroughly I butter dariole moulds, I have historically had a bit of a stress getting things out of them until John introduced me to this method. Rather that slipping a smooth knife down the sides of the cake to loosen it from the tin, simply tap the tin sharply and all the way around with the handle of a metal knife – they come out beautifully then – have used this method with panna cottas, ice cream and mousses as well as cake – thank you darling!

The story behind Black Velvet…

Amazing what you can find on Google: “This famous drink was invented in 1861 at Brook’s Club in London. Prince Albert had died, everyone was in mourning. The story goes that the steward at the club, overcome with the emotion of the occasion, ordered that even the champagne should be put into mourning and proceeded to mix it with Guinness. The taste was so delicious the Black Velvet quickly became extremely popular.”

Inspired by…

Good Food Magazine (2011)

How easy…

Whiz, bake, whip, enjoy – that’s it!!!!

Revani

Ooooh, this is lovely, especially with a double espresso mid morning! (My exact words were, “Yum, that was naughty and delicious!” Torn out of a magazine, this recipe for Greek Revani is gorgeous! Using semolina creates a denser sponge than normal and the syrup that is absorbed into it makes this delightful treat really moist and moreish. Gentle flavours and fragrances of orange and lemon permeate and, despite its delightfully squidgy density, it’s so light that it’s very easy to simply reach for a second slice. Highly recommended – absolutely delicious! Also, dead easy and really quick to make!

Serves 10

What you need…

1 x 23cm spring form cake tin, lightly buttered and lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper

5 eggs, separated

100g caster sugar

50g plain flour

100g semolina

¼ teaspoon salt

Zest of 1 orange

50g unsalted butter, melted

50g no-peel marmalade

for the syrup

250g caster sugar

Zest and juice of 1 large lemon

½ vanilla pod, split and seeds scraped out

300ml water

What to do…

Preheat oven to 180°c / 350°f / gas 4.

Chuck your egg yolks and sugar into the food processor and whizz until light and creamy. Whilst still running, tip the flour and semolina into the processor and then the salt, orange zest, melted butter and marmalade. Keep whizzing until smooth.

In a separate bowl, use an electric hand held whisk to whip up the egg whites until they form soft peaks and then gently fold into the cake batter in 3 batches.

Pour the whole lot into your cake tin and pop in the oven for 25 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean.

Meanwhile, make the syrup. Put all the ingredients, including the vanilla pod into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Allow to cool a little and then sieve the syrup into a jug. Squish some of the vanilla seeds through the sieve into the strained syrup (this isn’t necessary – it’s more for appearance than taste).

When the cake has cooled for 20 – 30 minutes, transfer it from the tin to a serving plate and then use your skewer to pierce holes all over the cake, poking it right the way through. Gently pour over the syrup, watching as it soaks into the sponge, making it lovely and moist. I didn’t tip all the syrup in all at once but gradually, coming back to the cake every few minutes and pouring a bit more over once the previous amount had been absorbed, until it was all gone.

That’s it – all done, ready to indulge in – absolutely delicious!

Serving suggestion…

On its own is fabulous but if you want to dress it up a little, spoon a dollop of Greek yogurt on the top, sprinkling with slightly crushed pistachios – delightful!

Tip…

As much as Revani is gorgeous and impossible to resist when first cooked, keep it in the fridge and it will ‘gather’ over a couple of days, tasting – dare I say it – even better!

 Inspired by…

Yotam Ottolenghi for Waitrose magazine

 How easy…

Spectacularly and the results far outweigh the effort!

Revani Close up w

Passion Fruit Pots of Summer Sunshine

Another one from Mary Berry’s foolproof series, these little Passion Fruit Pots are simply delicious – they are light and fresh and the best description that I can give each of them is ‘a little pot of summer’! You can practically taste the sunshine! Simple to make, simply gorgeous to taste and quite simply, a ‘must-have’!

 Serves 6

 What you need…

 6 pretty glasses or pots to serve

600ml double cream

100g caster sugar

6 passion fruit

Juice of 1 lime

What to do…

Halve 5 of the passion fruit and scoop out the seeds and juice into the blender part of your food processor. Whizz until smooth – this will enhance the flavour and the fabulous smell will remind you of an English summer morning! Sieve into a jug. Set aside the sieved juice and throw away the seeds.

Pour the cream into a medium-sized saucepan, add the sugar and stir slowly over a low heat until the sugar has dissolved. Then, increase the heat and boil for 3 minutes, then remove from heat.

Add the cream to the juice and stir to combine. Add the lime juice and stir – you will see that the mixture is thickening up nicely. Pour into your 6 glasses and then pop in the fridge for at least 3 hours.

To serve, cut the remaining passion fruit in half, scoop out the seeds and juice and divide between the 6 glasses – you don’t need much but it is a nice finishing touch!

Enjoy your little pots of summer sunshine – quite simply delightful!

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy…

Extremely easy and quick to whip up!

Welsh Cakes

Warm, buttery, ever so light and delicately sweet, these little Welsh Cakes are a lovely teatime treat and take next to no time to whip up. A real feeling of ‘granny’s home-baking’ comes with them, delightfully crisp on the outside and softer and slightly crumbly in the middle; and they can be enjoyed either with just a sprinkling of caster sugar or with butter and jam or cream and summer fruits – I loved them straight from the pan – not all of them made it to the tin for later enjoyment with the family!

Makes 16

What you need…

1 x 6cm cookie cutter

225g plain flour

85g caster sugar

½ teaspoon mixed spice

½ teaspoon baking powder

Pinch salt

50g butter, cut into chunks

50g lard, cut into chunks, plus a little extra for frying

50g currants

1 egg, beaten

Caster sugar to serve (optional)

What to do…

Tip the flour, sugar, mixed spice, baking powder and salt into your food processor and whiz just to mix them all together. Drop in the butter and lard and whizz again until the mixture looks like breadcrumbs. Add your currants and whizz to mix in. Finally, slowly add your beaten egg, whizzing until you can see the dough forming.

Tip the lot out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead until the dough comes together – it should be a similar consistency to short crust pastry.

Roll out to 1 cm thick and cut out rounds with your cookie cutter, re-rolling any trimmings. Drop a small knob of lard into a heavy-based frying pan and melt over a moderate heat. Cook your Welsh Cakes in batches – 2-3 minutes each side, until they are lovely and golden brown and crisp on the outside.

Serve warm if possible but if not, allow to cool on a cooling rack, sprinkle with sugar (if that’s your serving preference) and keep them in an airtight tin (for up to a week apparently – not that we’ll ever get to test that notion!)

Inspired by…

Good Food Magazine (March 2008)

How easy…

Ever so! And really quick too!

 

 

 

Honeycomb Ice Cream

It’s another OMG moment!!!!! Mary Berry made this on Monday night and I did think, “Ooh, I gotta give that one a go!” Made yesterday and sampled today – what can I tell you – its unbelievably easy to make (and a whole lot of fun, given the honeycomb process) and tastes absolutely out of this world – I’m not kidding – give this a go – it won’t be the last time you make it! How can anything this amazing be this simple?! Thank you Mary!!!

Serves 8

What you need…

1 large sheet of Bake O Glide/non-stick baking paper

1 x 900g loaf tin

4 tablespoons golden syrup

150g caster sugar

2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

600ml double cream

397g (1 tin) full-fat condensed milk

2 teaspoons popping candy (optional)

OK, so we can agree: this isn’t diet ice cream but what a horrid concept that is anyway!!!

What to do…

In a large, deep saucepan, chuck in the syrup and sugar and stir over a low heat until the sugar has dissolved. Increase the temperature to moderate and simmer for 5-6 minutes until you have a beautiful honey-coloured caramel.

Remove from the heat and tip in the bicarbonate of soda, mixing like crazy until it is evenly incorporated and foaming (reminds me of one of Connagh’s slightly dodgy childhood experiments!)

Tip the foaming honeycomb out onto your Bake O Glide or baking paper – it will naturally spread into a large circle and then just stop spreading as it starts to set. Leave for about 20 minutes, until the honeycomb has hardened and cooled down and then break into bite-sized pieces – dead easy – it looks much tougher than it actually is! Pop a third of the honeycomb into an air-tight container and save for decoration later.

Whilst the honeycomb is cooling, do a couple of jobs; firstly, fill the loaf tin with cold water and then empty it again. Line the tin with cling film (the water residue helps the cling film to stick to the tin).

Next, fill the saucepan that you used to create the honeycomb with water and then put it on a high heat. As the water comes to the boil, it will melt the residue honeycomb that is stuck to the inside of the pan – then you can just chuck it down the sink – no horrid scrubbing!

Then, make the ice cream: whip the double cream into soft peaks and then stir in the condensed milk. Tip in the remaining two-thirds of the honeycomb and popping candy, if using, and stir to disperse evenly.

Pour into the prepared loaf tin, level off the top and cover with cling film. Freeze overnight.

To serve, tip out and remove the cling film. Sprinkle with the saved honeycomb. Leave for 10 minutes to soften enough to cut, then cut into slices – don’t be mean with them – people are only going to ask for seconds!

Sooooo, soooo naughty but……sooooo, sooooo good!

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy…

As the lady says, “Foolproof!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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