Drunken Hot Toddy Sponge Pudding

These lovely, easy little puddings are elevated to new heights with the introduction of the whisky-based drunken sauce. Perfect for a cold winter’s evening or to conclude a Burns Night Supper.

Serves 4

What you need…

4 x 180ml pudding moulds, liberally buttered

for the sauce

150 golden caster sugar

150ml double cream

150ml whisky

for the sponge puddings

115g salted butter, softened

75g golden caster sugar

40g runny honey

Zest of 1 large lemon

2 eggs, beaten

115g self-raising flour

What to do…

First to the sauce: place the sugar in a large saucepan (copper if you have it) over a high heat. Melt the sugar, swirling the pan rather than stirring the sugar to ensure the sugar caramelises evenly. Once the sugar has turned into a wonderful golden syrup, pour in the cream slowly, stirring it in as you go: the mixture will become volcanic – spitting in a frenzied fashion – don’t be alarmed: just lean back and keep stirring. Then add the whisky and stir until the sauce starts to bubble – simmer for a couple of minutes to cook off the alcohol (otherwise your sauce will blow your head off and be quite bitter if you’ve used cheap whisky!) Set aside.

Preheat your oven to 180°c / 350°f /gas 4.

Into your food processor tip the butter and sugar and whizz until pale and fluffy. Add the honey and lemon zest and whizz again until evenly mixed. Whilst still whizzing gradually pour in the eggs, incorporating each bit before adding any more. Tip in the flour and whizz to mix.

Into each pudding mould pour 2 tablespoons of the whisky sauce. Then divide the pudding batter evenly between the four moulds. Pop onto a baking tray and bake for 25 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out dry.

Invert the little lovelies out into bowls or largish plates so that much sauce can be indulged in! If you fancy being totally indulgent, serve with double cream as well as the whisky sauce. It’s certainly the best hot toddy I’ve ever had!!!

Inspired by…

John Whaite

How Easy…

The sauce requires steady nerves whilst you’re judging when it is sufficiently converted from sugar to syrup and then again when it performs its volcanic eruptions, but actually it’s all quite straight forward.

 

 

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