Tag Archives: BBC Good Food

Chicken Kiev

The 85th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this one indulges the 1970s in a really, really good way!

A 70’s classic and an oldie but a goodie as they say. I don’t know why I’ve never made this before but having tried it once, it’s now a regular to our supper table. To cut through the crispy coating to the succulent chicken is lovely enough but then the big reveal: the garlicky butter oozes out of the meat and the wonderful aroma enticingly wafts towards you. Not only is the chicken beautifully flavoured throughout but all that butter assures the meat of a gorgeous moist lusciousness! I wouldn’t bring back the 1970s but this dish is staying firmly on this decade’s favourite list!

What you need…

4 plump skinned chicken breasts (or supremes)

125g dried breadcrumbs (see tip)

40g Parmesan

2 large, happy eggs, lightly whisked

50g plain flour

Pinch paprika

2 tablespoons rapeseed oil

String!

for the garlic butter

100g butter, softened

4 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon parsley, finely chopped

Squeeze of fresh lemon juice

What to do…

Use a fork to mash together all the garlic butter ingredients. Dump the whole lot onto a large piece of cling film and use the cling film to help you create a log shape. Pop the garlic butter in the freezer for 1 hour.

Lay the chicken breasts on a chopping board and use the point of a sharp knife to make a deep pocket in the middle of each one. Slice discs of garlic butter from your log and insert them into the pockets – be generous. Pull the meat together to cover the garlic butter and use the string to tie up the chicken breast like a parcel.

Take 3 plates or shallow, wide bowls. Into the first, mix together the flour and paprika. In the second, tip the whisked eggs and in the third, mix together the breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Now the fun bit, dip each breast, first in the flour, then the egg and then the breadcrumbs. Repeat the process for an extra crispy coating. Pop them on a plate and into the fridge for 1 hour.

Preheat your oven to 180°c / 350°f / gas 4.

Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a moderate heat and then fry the kievs for 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Pop onto a baking tray – pocket side up and cook for 20-25 minutes until cooked through.

Enjoy the ensuing garlicky aroma. Remind everyone about the string before they tentatively try their first bite and then devour the rest – they’re that good, honest!

Tip…

To dry out the bread, I stuck 2½ slices of white bread in a low oven for 10 minutes or so, before roughly cutting them up and whopping them in the food processor to create the breadcrumbs.

Inspired by…

BBC Good Food

How easy…

Very easy and really satisfying to make but you do have to be at home for the afternoon so that you can have time for the butter to sit in the freezer for an hour and the kievs to chill in the fridge for a further hour. Absolutely worth it though.

Cauliflower and Chestnut Soup

The 46th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is a gorgeous soup that really is a ‘hug in a bowl’ – perfect for right now.

This soup was described as a ‘hug in a bowl’ and I totally agree.  Absolutely delicious with the delicate cauliflower flavour being beautifully complemented by the earthiness of the chestnuts and rich decadence of the cream. Simply delightful, comforting and the perfect antidote to a dreary, cold day!

Serves 4

What you need…

Splash of olive oil

1 large red onion, chunked

1 large cauliflower, chunked into florets

250ml milk

850ml vegetable/chicken stock

150ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper

200g vacuum-packed chestnuts

25g Parmesan, shaved

Drizzle of truffle or olive oil, to serve

What to do…

Heat the oil in a large saucepan and chuck in the onion, cooking over a low heat for 10 minutes, until softened. Tip in the cauliflower, milk and stock and bring to a simmer, cooking for a further 15 minutes until the cauliflower is tender. Pour in the cream and season with salt and pepper. Bring to the boil and then remove from the heat. Chuck in the chestnuts and pour the lot into a blender, whizzing until smooth.

Serve your hug in a bowl topped with Parmesan, black pepper and a drizzle of truffle or olive oil. Simple and gorgeous!

Inspired by…

bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Delightfully!

 

The Yummiest Profiteroles

The 7th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, I love making profiteroles and the sheer exuberance that is eating these little gems filled with fluffy, sweet cream and topped with an indulgent quantity of intense, dark chocolate – heaven!

One of my son’s favourites, these little profiteroles are fabulously naughty: pop them in and just revel in the indulgence that pervades your taste buds! One is never enough!

What you need…

50g butter, preferably unsalted, plus a knob

2 tablespoons caster sugar

150ml water

75g plain flour, sifted with a pinch of salt

2 eggs, lightly beaten

300ml double cream

200g good quality dark chocolate

What to do…

Heat the oven to 220°c/200°c fan/gas 7.

Put the butter and 2 teaspoons of the caster sugar in a saucepan with the water. Place the pan over a low heat until the butter and sugar have melted, then bring to the boil. Take off the heat, tip in the flour all at once and beat energetically with a wooden spoon until the dough comes away from the sides of the pan.

Leave to cool for 5 minutes, then, using a food processor beat in the eggs bit by bit until you have a stiff, glossy mixture. Rinse two baking trays with cold water, shaking off any excess so they are slightly damp (this helps the choux pastry to rise). Using two teaspoons, spoon blobs of the mixture onto the baking trays. Then place in the oven and cook for about 18-20 minutes until well risen and brown. Remove the profiteroles from the oven and cut a small slit in the base of each one so they don’t collapse. Cool on a wire rack.

When they are cold, whisk together the remainder of the caster sugar and double cream until just holding its shape. Sweeten to taste. Spoon cream into a piping bag and using the slits in the base of the profiteroles, fill each bun to nearly bursting point with cream (these desserts are exuberant so no half-heartedness here – total indulgence or don’t bother!)

Break up the chocolate and put into a heatproof glass bowl in a steamer over a pan of boiling water. When the chocolate has melted, use a spoon to spread it over the profiteroles – again, no holding back – it should be dribbling down the sides in an ‘artistic’ manner. Put the chocolate-topped profiteroles in a cool room to set. Stack up on top of one another to create a mountain of naughtiness and serve. Just scrummy!

Inspired by…

BBC Good Food

How Easy…

Really easy if you follow the instructions! The wrong flour results in flat, hard disks (I know from experience) but give them a little attention and you will be addicted!