Tag Archives: Dessert

Double Chocolate Vanilla Ring Cake

Definitely a celebration cake this one (you can just celebrate the dawn of a new baking day). Rich and brownie-like in texture, albeit a little lighter, very moreish, and undoubtedly naughty with the sweet foil that is the oh-so-chocolatey frosting. If you love chocolate, you’ll adore this!

What you need…

1 x 20cm savarin/bundt cake mould, liberally buttered

150g unsalted butter, chunked

150g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids) chunked

125ml full fat milk

1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste

25g dark muscavado sugar

3 large, happy eggs

150g full fat Greek yogurt

200g plain flour

40g cocoa, sifted

1 rounded teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

150g golden caster sugar

for the frosting

200g milk chocolate (70% cocoa), chunked

40g unsalted butter, chunked

60g cocoa, sifted

120ml full fat milk

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste

White chocolate shavings, to decorate

What to do…

First, to the cake: preheat your oven to 190˚c / 375˚f / gas 5.

Into a large, heatproof bowl, tip the butter, dark chocolate, milk, vanilla bean paste and muscavado sugar. Set over a pan of gentling simmering water and stir together to create a thin ‘cream’. Remove from the heat, add the eggs and yogurt and use a handheld electric whisk to beat together the ingredients.

In another large bowl, use a metal spoon to mix together the flour, cocoa, bicarbonate of soda and golden caster sugar. Pour over the melted chocolate mixture and use a sturdy balloon whisk to mix together all the ingredients gently.

Pour this gooey loveliness into your savarin mould and pop into your oven to bake for 30-40 minutes or until set and an inserted skewer comes out clean.

Allow cake to cool completely in its tin before inverting it onto a serving plate.

To the frosting: in a large bowl, melt the chocolate and butter over a pan of gentling simmering water until smooth. Add the cocoa, milk, maple syrup and vanilla bean paste and use a balloon whisk to beat together to create a thick, glossy, gloopy frosting.

Generously trickle the frosting over the top of the cake – now is not a time for precision or neatness – let it dribble down the sides and keep going with the trickling and dribbling, until it’s all gone and looks as naughty as it tastes. Sprinkle over white chocolate shavings (created by grating the edge of a good quality white chocolate bar with a vegetable peeler).

Pop into an airtight container ready to serve a few hours later when the frosting is still gooey and soft – absolutely and decadently delicious.

Tip…

I made the sponge cake the day before I needed it, leaving it overnight in its mould in an airtight cake tin, so all I needed to do on the day of indulgence was the frosting – the cake remained moist and fresh and to make it was very relaxing.

Inspired by…

The Mail on Sunday’s ‘You’ magazine

How easy…

Very easy, especially if you split the cake making from the decorating (see tip)

 

 

 

 

 

Mini Rum Yum Babas

Wow! Wow! Wow! I am soooooo pleased I found this recipe! Individual, little gorgeous very grown up cakes that, whilst saturated in a rum-infused syrup, are so light, that you could very easily devour at least two, perhaps three, in one sitting: so tempting are they!

I’ve wanted to make rum babas for as long as I can remember but was put off by the apparent complexity and time involved in their creation. I read this alternative to the traditional recipe and my first thought was ‘well, I can’t see how that will work’ but I gave it a go anyway – ridiculously quick and easy as well as spectacularly gorgeous, these little retro lovelies will be gracing our dinner party tables until all of our friends have indulged in them! Welcome back from the 1970s, a thoroughly modern version of the fabulous rum baba!

Makes 8

What you need…

1 x 12-Cavity Mini Fluted Non-Stick Pan (I bought one from Amazon for £15 – I can make all sorts of lovely treats in it).

110g icing sugar, sifted

40g ground almonds

100g egg whites (from 2 – 3 large, happy eggs)

2 teaspoons maple syrup

60g unsalted butter, melted and then cooled but still soft

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

50g flour, sifted

½ teaspoon baking powder

for the rum syrup

300ml hot water from the kettle

300g caster sugar

100 – 150ml Caribbean dark rum

for the glaze

1 rounded dessertspoon apricot jam

2 tablespoons water

What to do…

The evening before you want to indulge in your babas, use an electric handheld whisk to combine the icing sugar and ground almonds in a large bowl. Tip in the egg whites and whisk to blend, then add the maple syrup, butter and vanilla extract, still whisking. Finally, add the flour and baking powder, whisking to combine. Cover with cling film and pop into your fridge and leave overnight.

Perhaps now is a good time to make the rum syrup: tip the caster sugar into a jug and top up with the water from the kettle. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Set aside to cool. Pour in 100ml rum, taste and then add more rum until it tastes just the way you like it (150ml for me!). Set aside.

The following morning, preheat your oven to 200˚c / 400˚f / gas 6.

Liberally butter 8 of the baba moulds and then dust with flour, tipping them upside down to get rid of the excess.

Spoon the baba mixture into the prepared moulds, filling them to just over half way. Pop into your oven for 12-14 minutes until golden and firm.

Leave in their moulds for 5 minutes, then use the tip of a knife to tease them out onto a cooling rack to cool completely.

Place your babas into a shallow dish and then use a cocktail stick to prick them all over. Pour the syrup all over them and leave them to soak for 40 minutes, occasionally using a spoon to baste them with the syrup – it will mainly soak into the babas, leaving only a little in the bottom of the dish.

Make the glaze by putting the jam and water into a small saucepan and gently heating, stirring to combine. Brush the glaze all over the babas.

Transfer them to serving places and share them to delighted friends and family (but NOT their children!) with sweetened, whisked double cream and fruit of your choice. Be ready to offer seconds!

Inspired by…

The ‘sponge’ recipe was in the Mail on Sunday’s ‘You’ magazine and the syrup and glaze were taken from a 1970’s classic: Supercook!

How easy…

Really easy and quick and they taste spectacular!

Bakewell Tart

Such a joy this one: crisp pastry encircling the sweet, luscious and moist frangipane ‘sponge’ with a gorgeous little lip smacker of raspberry jam; all of which is topped with flaked almonds and a smattering of icing – absolutely delicious and something eccentrically and essentially English about the whole thing! Perfect for springtime, perfect with a cup of tea – an absolute darling of a pud!

Serves 12-14

What you need…

for the pastry

25cm x 4cm deep loose-bottomed tart tin, liberally buttered and lined on the bottom with parchment paper

250g plain flour, plus a little for dusting

50g icing sugar, plus a little for dusting

A pinch of salt

135g butter, straight from the fridge, cut into small cubes

1 large, happy egg, beaten

2 tablespoons ice cold water

for the filling

200g raspberry jam

250g unsalted butter, softened

250g caster sugar

2 large, happy eggs, beaten

80g plain flour

250g ground almonds

Zest of 1 lemon, finely grated

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

40g flaked almonds

4 tablespoons apricot jam

2 tablespoons water

20-30ml amaretto liqueur

40g icing sugar

What to do…

First, to the pastry: tip the flour into your food processor. Sift in the icing sugar and salt. Add the butter cubes and pulse until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.

Tip in the beaten egg and water and pulse until it comes together.

Dust your worktop with sifted icing sugar and a little plain flour. Gather the pastry up into your hands and then quickly knead it on your worktop to form a ball.

Roll out to just over the thickness of a £1 coin and line your tart tin and then pop in the fridge for 30 minutes. Trim away the excess pastry, prick the bottom of the pastry case with a fork and pop in the freezer for 10 minutes. I don’t know why I do this but it works this way. I can’t be doing with the chillin’ before the rollin’ – it just doesn’t work out for me – this way does! Whop your oven on to 180˚c / 350˚ / gas 4 and put a large baking sheet inside.

Line your pastry case with foil and then fill up with baking beans before popping in the oven onto the baking sheet for 15 minutes. Remove the foil and beans and pop it right back for a further 10 minutes. Set aside to cool to room temperature and then spread over the raspberry jam.

Pop your baking sheet back into the oven.

To the frangipane filling: tip the butter and caster sugar into your food processor and whizz until pale and fluffy. Whilst still whizzing, slowly add the eggs little by little. Tip in the flour and whizz until incorporated. Then tip in the ground almonds, lemon zest and vanilla extract. Whizz until evenly mixed in.

Dollop the filling on top of the raspberry jam and level with the back of a spoon. Scatter over the flaked almonds and slide the tin onto the hot baking sheet and bake for 50-55 minutes until golden and just set.

Remove your tart to a cooling rack to start to cool.

In little saucepan, warm the apricot jam and water, stirring to mix together. Strain and then brush over the top of the still-warm tart.

Stir the amaretto liqueur into the icing sugar to create runny icing and then drizzle over the cooled tart. Leave to set for 10 minutes before serving. A lovely treat and absolute crowd pleaser.

Inspired by…

The pastry is my favourite recipe for sweet short crust pasty and the only recipe I use now: from Camilla Stephens, Higgidy. The main recipe is courtesy of Nathan Outlaw and was published in Delicious magazine.

How easy…

Very easy, now I’ve found a ‘no-fail’ pastry recipe. It takes time though, not that you need to be in kitchen throughout.

 

 

Mojito Cheesecakes

Quick and easy, light and refreshing, these elegant little lovelies also combine the wonderful contrast that is the almond-flavoured amaretti biscuits with the sharp lime and of course, the essential boozy kick of the rum – fab!

Makes 4 large ones or 6 petite ones (no prizes for guessing which ones I made!)

What you need…

Cocktail glasses or ramekins in which to serve

25g butter

60g amaretti biscuits, roughly crushed

100g full fat cream cheese

150ml double cream

2 tablespoons white rum

25g icing sugar

Juice and finely grated zest of 1 large lime

Extra grated lime zest or mint leaves, to decorate

What to do…

Melt the butter and then tip all but 2 tablespoons of the amaretti biscuits into the butter and stir to combine. Divide the butter-coated amaretti between your glasses/ramekins. Lightly press down.

In a large bowl, use an electric handheld whisk to beat together the cream cheese and cream. Add the rum, icing sugar and lime zest. Whisk again to combine. Tip in the lime juice and whisk again – the mixture will instantly thicken. Use a spoon to divide the filling between your glasses/ramekins.

Sprinkle the remaining amaretti crumbs over each cheesecake and then decorate with lime zest or mint leaves.

Pop in the fridge to chill. (They will also be fine for up to 2 days). Serve probably a little under room temperature – absolutely fabulous!

Inspired by…

The legend that is Mary Berry

How easy…

Fabulously!

Cumberland Rum Nicky

Having seen this on last week’s Great British Bake Off, I had to give it a go and….and it’s absolutely delicious! It reminds me of mince pies but has a richer, boozier and sweeter flavour and is thoroughly moreish. And then there’s the rum butter – I didn’t have the full 75ml that Mr. Hollywood recommends and thank God – with just 50ml, it was still incredibly boozy and incredibly good – an excellent accompaniment to this fab pud! Definitely give this one a go!

Serves 8 – 10

What you need…

1 x 20cm pie dish, about 3cm deep, liberally buttered

for the filling

225g dates, coarsely chopped

100g dried apricots, coarsely chopped

50g stem ginger syrup, drained and finely chopped

50ml dark rum

50g soft dark brown sugar

50g unsalted butter, cut into 1–2cm cubes

for the sweet shortcrust pastry

200g plain flour

2 tablespoons icing sugar

100g cold unsalted butter, cut into 1cm cubes

1 large, happy egg, lightly beaten

1 teaspoon lemon juice

for the rum butter

100g unsalted butter, softened

225g soft light brown sugar

50ml dark rum

What to do…

Mix all the filling ingredients, except the butter, together in a bowl. Set aside

while you make the pastry.

Now, turn to making the pastry: tip the flour and icing sugar into your food processor and whizz together. Add in the cubed butter and whizz until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Tip the mixture into a mixing bowl.

Mix the egg with the lemon juice and two tablespoons of cold water. Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the egg mixture. Using a table knife, work the liquid into the flour to bring the pastry together. If it seems too dry, add a splash more water. When the dough begins to stick together, use your hands to gently knead it into a ball. Wrap in cling film and rest in the fridge for at least 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.

Once the dough has rested, cut it into two pieces, roughly one-third and two-thirds. Roll out the larger piece on a lightly floured work surface. Line your pie dish with the pastry, leaving any excess pastry hanging over the edge. Tip the filling into the pastry case, spreading it evenly and dot with the butter.

Roll out the remaining pastry and cut it into eight long strips, roughly 1cm wide. On a sheet of baking parchment, use the pastry strips to create a lattice with four strips going each way, passing them under and over each other.

Dampen the edge of the pastry in the tin with water, then invert the lattice from the paper onto the tart. Press the ends of the strips to the pastry base to secure.

Bake for 15 minutes, then turn the oven down to 160˚c / 325˚f / gas 3 and cook for a further 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, for the rum butter, use an electric handheld whisk to beat together the butter and sugar, then gradually beat in the rum. Pop into the fridge until needed.

Serve the tart hot, with a spoonful of rum butter. Absolutely, fabulously delicious!

Inspired by…

Paul Hollywood and The Great British Bake Off

How easy…

Really easy and an absolute joy to make.

Luscious Lemon Pavlova

Wow! I’m not a great fan of lemon curd (but made my own which is waaaaay nicer than shop-bought) but was drawn to this recipe anyway. The fabulous crisp, sweet crust of the meringue with its soft, light centre contrasts superbly with the sweet but tart lemon curd and the cloud-like whipped cream that tops it. A sprinkling of lemon zest and toasted almond slivers completes this luscious pudding that Nigella quite rightly describes as a ‘triumph’ – easy and glorious – give it a go!

Serves: 8-12

What you need…

1 x baking tray, lined with baking parchment

6 happy egg whites

375g caster suga

2½ teaspoons cornflour

Grated zest of 2 lemons, separated

Juice of 1 lemon

50g flaked almonds

300ml double cream

325g jar lemon curd (I used homemade but shop bought is fine)

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4/.

Using a handheld electric whisk, beat the egg whites until satiny peaks form, then beat in the sugar one large spoonful at a time until the meringue is stiff and shiny.

Sprinkle over the cornflour, then the zest of one lemon and 2 teaspoons of lemon juice.

Using a balloon whisk, gently fold in until everything is thoroughly mixed together. Mound onto your lined baking tray in a fat circle approximately 23cm in diameter, smoothing the top with a spatula.

Pop into your oven, then immediately turn the temperature down to 150˚C / 300˚f / gas 2 and cook for 1 hour.

Switch off your oven put leave your rather gorgeous pavlova in there for a further 30 minutes but with the door completely open – this will stop it cracking too quickly as it cools down.

Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely.

Just before you’re ready to indulge, slide your pavlova onto a pretty serving plate.

Toast the flaked almonds, by frying them in a dry pan over a moderate heat until they have started to colour, shaking the pan regularly. Don’t take your eyes off them – this takes just a minute or so and they burn really easily. When they’re done, remove to a cold plate so that they don’t carry on cooking.

Whip the cream until soft peaks are formed (or as Nigella says, ‘has a soft voluptuousness about it!!!!!) and set aside.

If your lemon curd is shop-bought, put it into a bowl and beat it with a wooden spoon to loosen it a little and then taste it, adding a squeeze of juice if it’s too sweet.

With a light hand, a glad heart and a spatula (these are her exact words and whilst I normally re-write the recipes from scratch, this somewhat gloriously ridiculous line HAD to be left in) spread the lemon curd on top of the meringue base. Top with the whipped cream, peaking it as if it were a meringue topping and then sprinkle with the remaining lemon zest followed by the flaked almonds.

I should say serve, but honestly, once you’ve tasted the first mouthful, you’ll want to attack and devour the rest – an absolute triumph of a pudding!!!!!

Inspired by…

Nigella Lawson

How easy…

Really easy and it is rather a show-stopper of a pud for very little effort!

 

Chocolate and Coffee Mousse with Rum

Silky, smooth and deeply, decadently chocolatey with a hint of rum, these very grown up chocolate mousses takes just a few minutes to knock up and even less time to demolish! Very yummy and deliciously naughty!

Makes 6

What you need…

125g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), chunked

25ml espresso coffee

1 tablespoon rum

3 large, happy eggs, separated

1 tablespoon maple syrup

What to do…

Use a handheld electric whisk to beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Set aside.

Tip the chocolate into a heatproof bowl, add the espresso and rum and then sit the bowl in a steamer over a pan of boiling water (bain marie).

As soon as the chocolate has melted, take the bowl out of the bain marie and allow the chocolate mixture to cool for 2 minutes. Stir in the egg yolks and maple syrup.

Use a metal balloon whisk to fold 1 spoonful of egg whites into the chocolate mixture. Tip in the remainder of the egg white and then very gently fold into the mixture, again using the balloon whisk.

Divide the mixture between 6 pretty glasses, cups or bowls and pop into the fridge for 2 hours.

If you fancy, you can decorate your mousses with a little grated white chocolate, but otherwise just serve them as the come – deliciously naughty!

Inspired by…

Kirstie Allsopp

How Easy…

Really, really easy and quick.

 

 

Pineapple Steeped in Kirsch

I don’t suppose I can really call this a recipe, but it’s definitely worth sharing. This dessert is gorgeously refreshing and tangy BUT with a definite kick – the sweet, juicy flavour of the pineapple combined with the subtle (but extremely alcoholic) taste of the Kirsch cherry liqueur is simply sublime. A lovely dessert, summer or winter, but especially good after something really spicy, e.g. a hot curry.

What you need…

1 ripe pineapple

80ml Kirsch liqueur

Sprig of mint, to garnish (optional)

What to do…

Cut the pineapple in half lengthways, remove the flesh and discard the core. Chunk the fruit into bite-sized pieces. Tip the pineapple chunks into a bowl, pour over the Kirsch and cover with cling film. Give the whole lot a good shake and then pop into the fridge overnight to allow the wonderful flavours to develop.

Serve the Kirsch-steeped pineapple chunks on their own or with a dollop of double cream or natural yogurt. That’s it – couldn’t be easier and very well worth the minimal effort!

Tip…

You might want to shake the bowl every now and then whilst it’s ‘gathering’ in the fridge, just to make sure the Kirsch is evenly distributed.

A little bit about Kirsch…

Produced mainly in Germany, but also in Switzerland and the Alsace region of France, Kirsch’s full name is kirsch wasser (pronounced vasser), meaning cherry water. Originating from the Black Forest, in the Southern area of the country, it’s an eau de vie (a type of brandy) made by double-distilling the fermented juice of the sour morello cherry. As it’s not aged in contact with wood (barrels are coated with wax to prevent this happening), kirsch is clear in colour, and the flavour subtley hints at its cherry origins, rather than being sweet and cloying.

Inspired by…

Absolutely no idea! Have been knocking this little one up for years!

How easy…

Simples!

Cherry and Almond Cloud Cake

What a fantastic showoff of a summer cake this is: light, sweet sponge layers together with millions of fresh, juicy ripe cherries snuggling in light cloud-like cream: totally OTT, totally audacious and totally gorgeous!!!!! Bake when the cherries are in season and plentiful – cheap from the local market.

Serves 12 -16 lucky people

What you need…

2x 20cm deep cake tins, liberally buttered and lined with baking parchment

8 happy eggs, separated

320g golden caster sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Grated zest of 1 lemon

320g ground almonds

50g plain flour

Pinch of salt

600ml double cream

150g Greek yogurt

2 tablespoons icing sugar, plus extra for decorating

750g cherries, stoned and halved

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 170˚c / 325˚f / gas 3.

Into your food processor, tip the egg yolks and 160g of the sugar. Whizz for 3-4 minutes, until pale and thickened. Add the vanilla essence and lemon zest and whizz to combine.

Tip the egg whites into a large mixing bowl and use an electric handheld whisk to beat until stiff peaks are formed. Add 3 tablespoons of the remaining sugar and whisk again until stiff and shiny. Tip in the rest of the sugar and whisk to incorporate. Rinse off your whisks – you’ll need them again in a bit.

Using a large metal spoon, mix a large spoonful of the egg whites into the yolk mixture to loosen. Then tip all of the yolk mixture into the whites and use a balloon whisk to gently fold together. Then, gently fold in the ground almonds, flour and salt.

Divide the cake mixture between your two prepared tins and pop in the oven to bake for 40 – 50 minutes, until the sponge comes away from the sides of the tin. Remove and leave to cool in the tins for 10 minutes; then carefully invert the sponges onto a cooling rack, remove the baking parchment and cool completely.

Halve each sponge horizontally (I hate this bit – use a sharp serrated knife, take your time and keep checking that you’re cutting straight – it’ll be fine).

Using your electric handheld whisk, lightly whip together the cream, yogurt and icing sugar. Taste and add more sugar if you’d like it a bit sweeter.

Assembly time! Place one of cake base halves on a serving place and spread with ¼ cream. Scatter with ¼ cherries. Repeat with the other three sponge layers, ending with a cloud of cream and flourish of cherries. To serve, sprinkle with icing sugar and then indulge – prepare to get messy!

Serving suggestion…

Serve outside on a warm summer’s day in the dappled shade of a large tree; fizz chillin’ at your side, all with good friends and lots of laughter – perfect!

Inspired by…

Waitrose magazine but the cake was created for Suzy’s ‘21st’ birthday – I needed the excuse of a gathering to create such a large cake – even WE can’t eat that much cake!!!

How easy…

Very easy – takes a little time though. But it’s soooooooo worth it. x

Strawberry and Limoncello-Infused Mascarpone Tartlets

Oooooh so naughty and so easy and quick to rustle up. Crispy, crunchy, buttery filo pastry encasing Limoncello-infused mascarpone cream and topped with the season’s ripest, juiciest and sweetest English strawberries – just gorgeous!!! A word of warning though: it is impossible to eat them elegantly…but that’s part of the fun!

Makes 8

What you need…

1 x muffin tin

50g butter, melted

4 x rectangular sheets of filo pastry, each cut into 8 squares

30g icing sugar, sifted, plus extra for decoration

A large pinch ground cinnamon

1 egg yolk

1 tablespoon caster sugar

150g mascarpone

Grated zest of ½ lemon

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon Limoncello liqueur

300g strawberries, hulled and sliced

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚ / gas 4.

Brush 8 holes of the muffin tin with a little of the melted butter (not too much as the bottom of your tarts would be soggy and we can’t have that!)

Take 1 filo pastry square, brush with melted butter and sprinkle with icing sugar and then a little cinnamon. Do the same to another 3 squares, laying them on top of one another at a slightly different angle to create a rough star shape. Gently press the pastry into a muffin hole to create a cup. Repeat the whole process another 7 times to end up with 8 filo ‘cups’.

Pop them in the oven and cook for 8 minutes, until golden and crispy. Remove and cool for 10 minutes in their mould and then transfer to a cooling rack to cool down completely. If the bottoms are a bit too buttery, sit them on a double piece of kitchen paper on top of the cooling rack to absorb some of the butter (speaking from experience here!)

Whilst your little filo cups are in the oven, you can whip up the mascarpone cream. In a bowl, use an electric handheld whisk to beat together the egg yolk and caster sugar until pale. Add the mascarpone, lemon zest, vanilla extract and Limoncello and whisk until quite stiff. Have a little taste and adjust the sugar and Limoncello to taste!

Choose a pretty plate on which to serve this naughty little filo cups and divide the mascarpone cream evenly between them. Top with sliced strawberries and sprinkle with icing sugar. Devour immediately! Have serviettes on hand – you will need them! Enjoy this fabulous take on our traditional strawberries and cream. Hello summer!

Tip…

If you have one, use an icing sugar shaker for sweetening the filo pastry squares and decorating at the end.

Inspired by…

Gino D’Acampo

How easy…

Rather too easy – I can see these being rustled up on a regular basis!

 

 

 

 

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