Tag Archives: grapes

Green Salad with Halloumi, Grapes and Pomegranate Dressing

This is a really unusual and very lovely salad: fresh and tangy and with a combination of distinct flavours that almost unexpectedly, work really well together (halloumi with pomegranate or olives and grapes, for instance). And the dressing is a lovely piquant blend of tart and sweet – finishes the salad off beautifully. You could eat this salad on its own for lunch or serve it alongside barbecued meats or fish. Really loved it and will definitely be doing this one again. Yummy!

Serves 4 as a side salad

What you need…

3 large handfuls of your favourite salad leaves

1 handful fresh thyme, leaves stripped and stems discarded

1 handful green seedless grapes, halved

1 handful red seedless grapes, halved

10 pitted green olives, sliced

250g halloumi cheese, cut into bite-sized cubes

Knob of butter

80g pomegranate seeds

for the dressing

3 cloves of garlic, chopped

Juice and zest of 1 lemon

1 tablespoon sugar

2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses

60ml olive oil

What to do…

Tip all the dressing ingredients into a screw top jar. Pop the lid on tightly and shake like mad. Set aside.

Place the salad leaves into a pretty serving bowl and then scatter over the thyme, grapes and olives.

Melt the butter in a frying pan over a moderate heat and fry the halloumi until golden all over. Remove and scatter over the salad. Drizzle over the dressing and toss the salad gently. Garnish with the pomegranate seeds and enjoy being pleasantly surprised by this unusual salad before you reach for a second helping!

Inspired by…

Suzanne Husseini

How easy…

Well it’s salad so it’s not hard but very rewarding.

Old English Port Wine Jellies with Frosted Grapes

If, like me, you grew up in the 1970s you will probably remember the regular arrival of jelly and Carnation Cream as a pudding. I can recall with relish, gently mashing up the jelly and watching with fascination as the yellow-white ‘cream’ filtered through the jelly’s cracks. These days, jelly has fallen out of fashion, but I came across this recipe in one of Delia’s books and had to give it a go! It bears no resemblance to the 1970s versions, happily!!!!

Especially after a heavy main course, this dessert is simply delightful! An oldie but a goodie, it is light, fragrant and cool, not at all what you’d expect when you see that the ingredients include port and wine.

I didn’t ruin it with the addition of Carnation (that’s got to be spectacularly bad for you!) but tried it with and without a little cream and both versions work really well. Jelly is definitely back in fashion in this house!

Serves 4

What you need…

for the jellies

Four pretty stemmed glasses to serve

75g granulated sugar

285 ml water

1 stick cinnamon

3 cloves

Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon

1½ 12g packets powdered gelatine

210ml port (nothing too expensive)

75ml light red wine (I used a cheap Pinot Noir)

for the frosted grapes

Bunch seedless grapes, washed and dried

1 egg white

Caster Sugar

Bake O Glide/greaseproof paper

What to do…

Tip the sugar into a saucepan together with the water, cinnamon stick, cloves, lemon zest and juice. Cover the pan bring to the boil, then remove from the heat. Sprinkle in the gelatine and, using a balloon whisk. Gently whisk to dissolve. Let it cool for 15 minutes, gently whisking occasionally.

Strain the spices and zest from the syrup, pouring it into a jug. Stir in the port and wine and then taste. The flavour should be strong and rather sweeter than you might like but the sweetness lessens once the mixture is chilled and set, so add a little more sugar if you think it needs it (I added another 2 teaspoons) and stir it in until it dissolves. Pour the jelly syrup into your four stemmed glasses and pop in the fridge to set.

Meanwhile, onto your frosted grapes. Take two small bowls and in one, whisk up the egg white using a fork. In the other, tip in some caster sugar.

From your bunch of grapes, choose little bunches of two or three, ensuring that you leave them attached to their stalks as you separate them from the main bunch. Simply dip them into the egg yolk and then into the caster sugar, ensuring that they are evenly covered with the sugar, providing them with a frosted look. When you lift them out of the egg white, make sure there are no globules of egg white hanging off – they don’t look attractive when covered with caster sugar! Sit your bunches of frosted grapes onto a strip of Bake O Glide or greaseproof paper and set them somewhere cool and dry for a couple of hours (or overnight).

When you’re ready to serve your old English port wine jellies with frosted grapes, simply retrieve the jellies from the fridge and pop the frosted grapes on the top – so easy, so elegant, so delicious! Enjoy!

Serving suggestion…

A little jug of double cream with a teaspoon of caster sugar mixed in.

Inspired by…

Delia Smith (her Christmas book but I think this is a winner throughout the winter)

How easy…

Extremely easy, very quick and next to no mess!