Tag Archives: lemon

Lemon and Tarragon-Crusted Sea Bass

 So simple and so very, very yummy! A lovely crispy ‘panko’ coating contrasts beautifully with the fresh, tangy lemon tarragon sauce but doesn’t detract from the natural flavours of this delicious fish. A great dish for a supper with family and friends! Simply delightful!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking sheet, lined with parchment paper/ Bake O Glide

4 sea bass fillets, skin on

40g butter

60g panko breadcrumbs

Zest of 1 lemon, grated finely

½ tablespoon tarragon, chopped

40g Parmesan, grated

Sea salt and black pepper

Lemon wedges, to serve

for the lemon tarragon sauce

200g full-fat crème fraîche

½ tablespoon tarragon, chopped

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Pinch of caster sugar

What to do…

Season the sea bass fillets well on both sides with salt and pepper. Melt the butter in a small pan, then remove from the heat and stir in the breadcrumbs, lemon zest and tarragon so that all the ingredients are thoroughly mixed together. Set aside.

On your baking sheet, sprinkle over half the breadcrumb mixture in 4 rows, roughly the same size as the 4 fish fillets. Lay each fillet, skin side down, on top of a row of breadcrumbs and press down firmly. Top each fillet with the remaining breadcrumbs, sprinkle with Parmesan and chill in the fridge for 15 minutes (or for up to 8 hours).

When you’re ready to serve, preheat the oven to 200°c / 400° / gas 6.

To make the sauce, chuck all the ingredients together in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and mix together.

Cook the fish in the oven for 15 minutes. Serve each crispy-coated fillet on a warm plate with a dollop of the lovely sauce, a wedge of lemon and perhaps a little greenery and potatoes – absolutely delicious and delightfully easy!

What’s Panko all about…?

Panko breadcrumbs were a total revelation to me. I couldn’t believe that Mary was using pre-prepared breadcrumbs but these little lovelies can be set quite apart from your everyday breadcrumb!!! In short, panko is a type of flaky breadcrumb; it’s commonly used in Asian, particularly Japanese, cuisine, although it has become more popular in Western cooking. What sets it apart from standard breadcrumbs is its texture which is light, airy and delicate; all of which ensure that it crisps as it cooks. The texture of panko makes it especially wonderful for fried food because it absorbs less oil than breadcrumbs, keeping food more crisp and crunchy. I will be using it for all sorts from here on in – toppings, coatings and crusts are going to be panko all the way!

Tips…

The fish can be prepared up to 8 hours in advance and kept in the fridge until you’re ready to cook. Likewise, the sauce can be made a couple of days in advance.

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy….

I’m loving these recipes from Mary’s Everyday cook book – they’re all really easy and fit nicely into a busy schedule – this one is no exception – enjoy!

My Morning Honey, Lemon, Ginger and Cinnamon Pick Me Up

This drink, recently tweaked with the addition of cinnamon, is a lovely livener to greet the day with. The fresh lemon partnering the warmth of the ginger provides a gentle kick start and the cinnamon adds a lovely soothing aaahhhh with just a hint of Christmas going on! In combination, they make for a truly lovely start to any day! This recipe is to make up a whole pre-prepared jar that you can keep in the cupboard and dip into whenever you fancy – enjoy!

What you need…

for the cupboard mix

1 x 250g good quality honey

2cms fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped

2 heaped teaspoons ground cinnamon

for the daily morning pick-me-up

1 x tall glass

1 thick slice fresh lemon

1 teaspoon of your honey, ginger and cinnamon mix

Boiling water from the kettle

What to do…

To keep the mixture handy in the cupboard, open your new jar of honey and mix in the ginger and cinnamon so that all the ingredients are evenly mixed. Store in a dry, cool cupboard for access whenever you need it!

Each morning, add fresh water to the kettle and boil. In your glass, chuck the lemon slice and then a rounded runny teaspoon of the honey mixture. Pour over the hot water and stir to mix everything together. Allow to cool a little and then sip and enjoy, ideally relaxing listening to the radio, absorbing the news on the TV or in the paper, or more likely, whilst you’re organising everyone else in the house!

Inspired by…

Not sure: a combination of healthy suggestions I think!

How easy…

Well, it’s not hard is it? And, such a lovely treat to start the day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prawn, Chilli and Lemon Spaghetti

We do eat rather a lot of pasta and it was lovely to try this new recipe. It’s a hearty affair but not heavy: zesty lemon juice and plump prawns combine beautifully and are splendidly complemented by lots of lovely garlic and the gentle kick of chilli. A great family supper dish – we will be adding this to our ‘regulars’ list. Just yummy!

Serves 4

What you need…

Pasta of your choice: I prefer gluten-free, just because it’s lighter on the old tummy and doesn’t cause bloating

300g raw king prawns, shelled

80ml virgin olive oil

1 dried chilli, finely sliced

4 garlic cloves, chopped

Zest of 2 lemons, grated

Juice of 1 lemon

Large handful of parsley, chopped

(The image also shows scallops – there were a few left in the freezer so I just chucked them in – worked really well, but not necessary)

What to do…

Bring to the boil a large saucepan of salted water and then add your pasta and cook according to the packet instructions. Mine takes about 12 minutes, which was about perfect to cook the delicious sauce.

In a deep frying pan, heat a glug out of the 80ml olive oil and chuck in the prawns, stirring for a couple for a minutes or so or until they are just starting to turn pink.

Tip in the rest of the oil, chilli, garlic, lemon zest and juice, stirring to ensure that the prawns are all drenched in the lemony oil.

Drain the pasta and then add to the prawn and lemon sauce. Toss so that the sauce evenly coats all the pasta. Serve in pasta bowls and sprinkle lavishly with parsley, a good grind of black pepper and accompany with a lovely glass of wine – red for me!

Inspired by…

Delicious magazine

How easy…

Really easy and quick

Light and Lovely Lemon Mousse

What can I tell you – light, fresh, yummy, yummy, yummy, zesty, sweet, heavenly springs to mind. This is just a lovely, lovely lemon mousse that takes a bit of effort but is soooooo worth it. Try it and I guarantee you’ll add it to your favourites list!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x 1 pint mould, filled with cold water

1½ dessertspoons gelatine powder

45ml cold water

1½ eggs (I know! See tip!)

1 egg yolk

50g caster sugar

65ml lemon juice

Grated zest of 1½ lemons

125ml double cream, lightly whisked to soft peaks

What to do…

Take a large bowl (bigger than the one that you are going to whisk the eggs and sugar in), tip in a load of ice, top up with water and set aside.

Put a large saucepan over the heat with a steamer and bring to a simmer.

Tip the gelatine into the water to soften. Set aside.

Put the eggs and yolk with the sugar into a large heatproof bowl and pop into the steamer. Use a handheld electric whisk and beat for between 5 and 10 minutes until the mixture is pale and fluffy and the whisk leaves a distinct trail.

Remove from the heat, setting onto a tea towel on your worktop to prevent slipping. Add the lemon juice and zest and continue to whisk until the mixture is cool.

Stick the gelatine into a microwave for a few seconds to melt and then tip into the mixture. Whisk to incorporate.

Put your mixture bowl into the iced water bowl and pop in a balloon whisk. For 15 – 20 minutes (whilst you clear up) keep coming back to the mixture and give it a gentle little whisk, also scraping down the side of the bowl until the mixture is just starting to set. Fold in the cream so that it is evenly incorporated.

Empty the water from your mould and then tip your mixture in. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours. To unmould, fill your sink with hot water to a height just below that of your mould. Pop the mould into the water and remove when you see the sides of the mousse just coming away from the mould. Invert onto a pretty plate (remember to breathe – it will plop out – I promise!!!) and serve to a very appreciative audience! Enjoy – it is simply heavenly!

Tip…

This is half the original recipe – works perfectly for us when we’re on our own but obviously, you can’t really have half an egg. For the half, chuck an egg in a measuring jug, beat it with a fork just to mix it all together, see how much liquid there is and the chuck half down the sink. Sorry, but there it is: either this or double up and invite friends around or eat a lot of lemon mousse (not necessarily a problem!!!)

Inspired by…

No idea! Another once clipped from a magazine years ago that I have made and enjoyed successfully over at least 2 decades!

How easy…

It is easy, but it does take time and there’s quite a lot of clearing up. That said, it can be prepared 24 hours in advance so hey, job done if you have friends coming around!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baked Lemon Pudding

Returning from the gorgeous Amalfi Coast where lemon trees seemed to adorn every hillside, heavily laden with ripened fruit, I was inspired to do something with lemons. It is however, not yet warm enough to do a lemon sorbet or something naughty with the mildly addictive and delicious Italian lemon liqueur, Limoncello (both of these things are coming though, I promise) but I happened on this pudding recipe which manages to combine being oh so very, very light, fluffy and zesty with being gently comforting. Delving my spoon into the ‘still warm from the oven’ loveliness that is baked lemon pudding, the grey English skies didn’t seem so dreary after all. It’s also beyond easy and took next to no effort – perfect for the first day blogging after a week’s pampering. Give it a go!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

1 x 1 litre ovenproof dish, lightly buttered

1 x deep roasting tin

Kettle of boiling water

90g unsalted butter, cut into cubes

130g caster sugar

3 large eggs, separated

Zest and juice of 2 unwaxed lemons

30g plain flour

200ml milk

What to do…

Preheat the oven to 190° c / 375°f / gas 5.

Using an electric hand held whisk, beat the egg whites in a bowl until stiff and glossy. Set aside.

Chuck into your food processor the butter and sugar and whizz until softened and pale in colour. Add the egg yolks, one at a time, fully incorporating each one before adding the next. Keep whizzing and add the lemon zest and then the flour. Still whizzing, slowly tip in the lemon juice and then the milk – it will be a really sloshy mixture – don’t worry.

Tip the sloshy mixture into the egg whites and, using a balloon whisk, very gently fold the two together.

Carefully pour the mixture into your ovenproof dish and put the dish in the roasting tin. Pour boiling water into the roasting tin until it’s about 2cm deep. Pop the whole lot into the oven and bake for 35 – 45 minutes or until it’s golden brown (I left mine in for 40 minutes so whilst the inside tasted sublime, the top was a bit too dark – ovens vary!)

Cool slightly before serving this deliciously easy, light and tangy lemon pud. Enjoy!

Inspired by…

delicious magazine

How easy…

Very, very easy and a complete joy!

Heavenly Lemon Torte

 

This heavenly dessert is right up my street: ridiculously easy, tastes amazing and…doesn’t even require any cooking! Picture if you will a spoonful: the light and fluffy cream filling excites your taste buds with the gentle tanginess of lemon and then, the taste of chocolate follows through – absolutely delightful! The only other thing it needs is another spoonful and then another….Give it a go!

Serves 10 – 12 depending on how generously you cut your slices!

What you need…

for the base

1 x 20cm round spring form baking tin, lightly buttered and lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper

300g dark chocolate digestive biscuits

50g butter, melted

2 tablespoons double cream

for the filling

300ml double cream

265g condensed milk (2/3 of a standard 397g tin)

Lemon juice from 2 large or 3 small lemons

Zest of 1 large lemon

What to do…

Roughly break up your chocolate digestives, shove them in the food processor and whizz until they are crumbs. Remove the processor blade and then, using a spatula, mix in the melted butter and cream.

Press evenly into the bottom of your baking tin. Pop into the fridge whilst you prepare the filling.

Using a handheld electric whisk, whip the cream until it’s quite stiff and then, using a large balloon whisk, gently fold in the condensed milk, lemon juice and zest. Tip the lot onto the chocolate digestive base and return to the fridge to chill for at least 1 hour before serving. That’s it!!!

To serve, remove from the tin (I normally leave my puds on the base part of the spring form tin for fear of imminent collapse if it was removed) and gently peel away the Bake O Glide from the sides. Decorate with a little peeled lemon rind if you like and then just cut yourself your first – but most certainly not your last – slice of heavenly lemon torte – just yummy!

Inspired by…

The filling came from a Tim Siadatan recipe, but the base is attributed to Rachel Allen.

How easy…

It’s just a bit of mucking about really! And no cooking!

 

 

 

 

Crêpes Suzette and Other Pancakes

Who can resist? Shrove Tuesday – the perfect excuse to indulge in delicious, naughty pancakes, stacked high and topped traditionally with the sweet and tart marriage that is sugar and lemon or filled with some luscious alternatives. It doesn’t matter, whatever you choose, enjoy your crêpes Suzette and other pancakes!

Makes batter and sauce makes enough for 8 crêpes/pancakes

What you need…

for the crêpe/pancake batter

175g plain flour, sifted

2 large eggs

175ml milk

110ml water

Rapeseed oil

Greaseproof paper

for the classic crêpes suzette sauce

50g unsalted butter

150ml orange juice (3 large oranges)

Grated zest 1 orange

Grated zest and juice 1 lemon

1 tablespoon caster sugar

3 tablespoons Grand Marnier

What to do…

To make your crêpe/pancake batter (let’s refer to them as pancakes from hereon in – I’m getting fed up typing ‘crêpe/pancake’) tip the flour into a large jug together with the eggs, milk and water, and using an electric hand whisk, vigorously whisk the ingredients so that they are thoroughly blended, creating your batter.

Put a small frying pan on the highest heat with 1 teaspoon of rapeseed oil. When the oil is just smoking, add 1 ladle of batter and swish it around the pan so that the pan is evenly coated. Cook for about 1 minute. You’ll know when the underside of the pancake is cooked – just shake the frying pan and the pancake will easily move about. At this point – the fun part – remove the pan from the heat and tilt it so that the pancake slips to the furthest edge of the pan. Then, a quick flick of the wrist and flip that pancake…….how high depends on how confident you’re feeling!!!!! Cook for a further minute and then tip it out onto a piece of greaseproof paper.

Repeat this process until all the pancake batter has been used and you have a stack of pancakes, each separated by greaseproof paper.

In a medium-sized frying pan, melt the butter. Then add the sauce and gently warm. Place the first pancake into the pan and gently warm it before folding it in half and then in half again to make a triangle. Slide it to the edge of the pan and then tilt the pan so that the sauce runs back into the centre. Repeat this process until all the pancakes are reheated, folded and drenched in sauce.

Serve these delicious pancakes immediately on warmed plates and thoroughly enjoy this naughty dessert in the name of Shrove Tuesday! Yummy!

Alternative toppings and fillings…

Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice and a Smattering of Caster Sugar

The classic pancake topping. After squeezing and smattering, roll up and indulge. Simple and simply lovely.

Rhubarb and Vanilla

Rhubarb pancake w

To make enough for 4 generous pancake fillings, put 400g trimmed and sliced rhubarb into a lightly buttered ovenproof dish together with 70g caster sugar and a split vanilla pod. Cover with foil and pop into a preheated oven (160°c / 310°f /gas 3) and bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, and discard the vanilla pod. Gently mash the rhubarb and then spoon a ladleful on one half of the pancake, folding the over the half over the top. Indulge. Light, sweet and a lovely change from the normal.

Warmed Balsamic Strawberries

To make enough for 4 generous pancake fillings, hull and quarter 250g sweet, ripe strawberries and pop them in a saucepan over a moderate heat together with 1 teaspoon caster sugar and 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar. Stir until the sugar has dissolved and the strawberries have been gently warmed and coated in the balsamic glaze. Spoon a ladleful on one half of the pancake, folding the over the half over the top. Just divine although a dollop of vanilla ice cream on the top wouldn’t be inappropriate!

Chocolate Spread

Ugh!!!! But the kids like it. Smother chocolate spread over the top of the pancake, roll up and eat! No comment! Don’t let them near either the knife or the jar of chocolate spread – it’ll get messy!

Inspired by…

A bit of mix really. The batter mix is one of Delia Smith’s, the rhubarb and vanilla filling comes from Lisa Faulkner and the warmed balsamic strawberries from a vanilla cheesecake recipe by Stuart Gillies.

How easy…

Pancakes aren’t hard are they? You’ve just got to decide how naughty you want to be and how high you flip ‘em!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cold-Defying Hot Toddy

This recipe was passed on to me many years ago by the mother of a friend who presented me with a steaming mug of her cold-defying hot toddy having witnessed my red, inflamed nostrils and watery eyes as well as having to put up with the infernal coughing and sneezing that goes with a very average but miserable British cold. She swore by this comforting antidote and now so do I. The way its benefits were described to me are as follows: the honey eases your sore throat, the lemon provides a zap of vitamin C and the whisky, well, that helps you sleep (although John says that it means you just don’t care how rough you feel!!!). Ideally, consumed just before bedtime, I also reckon that it sweats out the cold whilst you are blissfully snoozing. All I can tell you is that I wake up the next morning well rested, soothed and the with the pesky cold on its way out of the door (a couple more nights of the same treatment may be required!)

Serves 1 poor mortal

What you need…

1 decent sized mug

60ml whisky (nothing expensive)

1 chunky slice lemon (maybe 1cm wide)

1 dessertspoon runny honey

Boiling water

What to do…

Pour your measure of whisky into the bottom of the mug – the amount is obviously personal. Add your honey, leaving the spoon in the mug. Pop in the lemon. Top up with boiling water and stir to dissolve the honey. Then use the tip of the spoon to ‘stab’ the lemon, extracting as much juice out of it as possible.

Pad upstairs to bed, snuggle under the duvet and then drink your hot toddy as soon as you can – it needs to be as hot as you can stand it. Enjoy its soothing properties and then switch out the bedside light and cuddle up for a good night’s sleep. This is possibly the very best part of having a cold!

Inspired by…

Margaret

How easy…

Well, it’s not hard is it?! And it minimises suffering.

 

 

Two-Ways Salmon Pasta with Basil and Lemon

This is a lovely pasta dish that is simultaneously light but comforting, zesty and fresh but soothing on the stomach. It comes from a book published in the early 1990s by the wonderful Keith Floyd called ‘Floyd on Hangovers’ – a witty little tome that contains advice on detoxing and a selection of recipes for the day after the night before! Having never suffered a hangover (I know, I’m sorry!) I’m not sure why I was bought the book and have since mislaid it, but I’ve been doing this version of one of his recipes for years. It seems a fitting one for New Year’s Day, I thought, although we enjoy it throughout the year.

As delicious as it is, I feel that on this occasion that I should share some of the nutritional benefits (and the reasons why the recipe was in the book, I guess). Both salmon and basil have anti-oxidant qualities, with the former offering omega 3 and vitamins D and B12 and the latter providing vitamins A, K, C, magnesium, iron, potassium and calcium (who knew?!!!!) and from lemon of course, vitamin c. So there’s a real ‘feel-good’ aspect to this one – great kick off for the New Year!

Serves 2

What you need…

A splash olive oil

2 salmon fillets

2 lemons

120g smoked salmon

Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning

2 good handfuls of basil, torn

Pasta of your choice (I prefer gluten-free)

What to do…

Preheat the oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

Rub olive oil all over a piece of foil and pop the salmon fillets in it. Squeeze half a lemon over the fish, season and then make the foil into a loose parcel. Pop in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until the fish is cooked al dente.

Bring a pan of salted water to the boil and pop in your pasta according to the packaging instructions – mine normally takes about 12 minutes.

In another large saucepan, squeeze into it the juice of 1½ lemon plus some sea salt and loads of roughly ground black pepper. Roughly tear up the smoked salmon into bite-sized pieces and arrange around the top edges of the saucepan – some will drop into the lemon juice – no worries. Using a fork, remove the skin from the oven-baked salmon and flake the fish into chunks, tipping them into the saucepan as you do. Throw the basil in over the top.

When your pasta is cooked, turn on the heat under the saucepan with all the ingredients in to moderate. Drain the pasta and tip into the salmon, basil, lemon juice mixture. Splash in a little olive oil and then mix everything together, incorporating the salmon from the edges of the saucepan evenly throughout.

Then, simply serve and enjoy your lovely, fresh, enlivening and gentle two-ways salmon pasta with basil and lemon!

Inspired by…

Keith Floyd, Floyd on Hangovers

How easy…

Very, very easy. A good one for a mid- eek supper

 

 

 

 

Light and Zesty Lemon Tart

A really light, creamy yet zesty, fresh version of this classic dessert, this lemon tart is quite simply, delightful. Seconds all round, please.

Serves 6

What you need…

1 x 23cm/9in shallow tart tin, with a removable base

1 x flat baking sheet

for the pastry

175g flour

Pinch of salt

100g butter, straight from the fridge

25g caster sugar

1 egg, separated: yolk in one cup and white in another

2 dessertspoons water

for the filling

3 eggs

125g granulated sugar

Juice and grated zest of 2 lemons

100ml double cream

What to do…

Grease your tart tin.

Sieve the flour and salt into a large bowl. Cut the butter into small cubes and rub into the flour until the mixture is like crumbs. Add the sugar and gently mix in with a spatula. Beat the egg yolk and then tip into the mixture, stirring until the mixture sticks together. At this point add the water, one teaspoon at a time until the mixture comes together – you may not need the whole 2 dessertspoons.

Cover your working surface with cling film and then flour lightly. Roll out your pastry on the cling film until about 5mm thick, creating a circle as best you can. Cover with another piece of cling film and then slide a flat baking sheet underneath the whole lot to lift it and pop in the fridge for at least 45 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 190°c / 375°f / gas 5.

Remove pastry from fridge and, keeping the pastry between the two pieces of cling film, gently roll it out until it’s about 3mm thick and large enough to line the bottom and sides of the prepared tart tin.

Remove the top piece of cling film and gently place the pastry upside down (cling film facing up) into the tin. Gently press into the edges and using your thumb, break off the pastry of the top edge of the tin to give a neat finish. Remove the cling film and pop the pastry into the freezer for 10 minutes.

The pasty needs to be blind-baked now so line it roughly with parchment paper, making sure the sides are also covered with the paper. Chuck in a load of baking beans (or dried pulses which can be used many times over) and blind-bake for 15-20 minutes until the pastry feels dry.

Remove the paper and beans. Lightly beat your egg white and use it to brush over the pastry. Pop the pastry back in the oven for two minutes.

Take out of the oven and put to one side until you are ready to make your filling (this could be immediately, later on in the day or even the next day).

Set the oven to 120°c / 250°f / gas ½.

In a food processor, pop your eggs and sugar and whizz for about 8 minutes, until the mixture is pale and creamy. Add the lemon juice and zest and process for a further 5 minutes. Pour in the cream and whizz for another 5 minutes.

Pour into the pastry case and pop it straight in the oven to bake for 25-30 minutes or until the filling has just set in the centre.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 10 minutes before taking the tart out of its tin and transferring to a pretty plate or cake stand. When it’s completely cool, dredge icing sugar over the top. Slice and serve your light and zesty lemon tart – it’s fresh and zingy, light and frankly, delightful!

Serving suggestion…

A little splash of double cream works wonderfully and this is a great dessert to serve with a ‘sticky’ dessert wine.

Inspired by…

Rachel Allen

How easy…

Well, at the time of first making this, I had never made my own pastry but I nervously followed that element of the recipe to the letter and ….it was too ‘short’. The second time, I adapted it and added more water and it was absolutely delightful. The lemon filling is quite heavenly and a dead easy – just a case of processing.

I do love this recipe, because the ‘tricky’ bit, i.e. the pastry, can be done in advance and the filling is dead easy.