Tag Archives: mustard

Smoked Haddock with Mustard Sauce

Wow! So easy and soooooo good. the rich, opulent but tangy sauce absolutely makes this dish and the fish is light and really flavoursome. So easy, no mess, such a wonderful mid-week treat – we’ll be having this again…and again!!!! But be warned: too much sauce is not good for you!!!! Thanks Martin (bro) for sharing this one!

Serves 4

What you need…

4 smoked haddock fillets, around 250g each

Splashes of rapeseed oil

8 garlic cloves, unpeeled

Handful of thyme sprigs

1 shallot, peeled and finely chopped

100ml cider

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

30ml double cream

100g unsalted butter, chunked

2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard

Sea salt and black pepper

4 large handfuls of samphire, to serve

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

First prep your fish fillets. For each haddock fillet, rip a large sheet of foil and rub over a little rapeseed oil. Pop the fish into the middle and drizzle over a little more oil. On top, place some thyme sprigs and two garlic cloves and then liberally season with black pepper. Bring the sides of the foil together, scrunching them to create a sealed parcel.

Tip your shallot, cider and cider vinegar into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer rapidly until the liquid has reduced right down – practically to nothing.

About when the liquid has reduced by half, pop the fish parcels into the oven and cook for 10 minutes.

Whilst the fish is cooking, return to the sauce. Once its reduced to practically nothing, stir in the cream and then, over a low heat, whisk in the butter, one chunk at a time. Once it’s all incorporated, stir in the mustard, season the sauce with sea salt and black pepper, taste (wow!) and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Keep warm.

In another saucepan, bring unsalted water to boil, pop the samphire into a steamer and steam over the water for just 2 minutes.

Lift your haddock fillets from their parcels onto warmed plates and pour over the cooking juices (very yummy). Plonk or arrange the samphire to the side of the fish and then pour over a little sauce, pouring the rest into a serving jug to be placed in the middle of the table and fought over!!!!! Enjoy – I promise you will!

Note…

We’re a bit of a saucy family(!) – Sunday roast for instance requires over a litre of gravy for just four us! Hence, when I looked at this recipe, I doubled the sauce….then I saw how much butter went into it – wow: heart attack stuff! That said, most of the sauce disappeared! The recipe above is for the original quantities not the Cindy version!

Serving Suggestion…

I used samphire but Nathan serves his with sea spinach. We also had parmentier potatoes (oven-roasted chunked red potatoes swirled in olive oil, dried rosemary, chopped garlic and sea salt).

Inspired by…

My bro! He recommended the dish. He did mention something about the amount of butter…..anyway, damned fine recommendation Martin….who in turn was inspired by Nathan Outlaw.

How easy…

Really easy and such a star of a recipe.

 

Chicken Breasts with Tarragon and Mustard Cream Sauce

In this dish, the humble chicken breast is smothered in a light but tangy velouté sauce, transforming the chicken into something that is absolutely delicious. I made loads of sauce (we do like our gravies and sauces in this house) so there was plenty to around and then, uncouth individuals that we are, there was sufficient left for us to dive into the jug and finish it off with a spoon. One very, very yummy supper dish.

Serves 4

What you need…

1 chicken stock pot (I use Knorr)

500ml boiling water from the kettle

1 tablespoon rapeseed oil

4 plump chicken breasts or supremes

6 tablespoons white wine

Sea salt and black pepper

60g butter

4 tablespoons plain flour

1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, finely chopped

2 egg yolks

200ml soured cream

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

Paprika

What to do…

To make a chicken stock, pop the stockpot into a jug and top up with boiling water, using a balloon whisk to help it dissolve quickly. Set aside.

In a roomy saucepan, heat the oil and seal the breasts quickly on both sides – don’t allow to brown. Tip in the wine and 6 tablespoons of chicken stock. Pop on the pan lid, turn down the heat to low and poach gently for 20 minutes, until cooked.

Remove the breasts from the liquid, season, cover and set aside, keeping warm.

In a second jug, tip the cooking liquid and top it up with the stock to make up 500ml. Discard the remainder of the chicken stock. Give your saucepan a quick wipe out with kitchen paper.

To make your velouté sauce, melt the butter in the saucepan. Stir in the flour and cook for a few seconds without browning. Tip in the tarragon and quickly stir in to evenly incorporate. Remove from the heat and gradually stir in the stock. Simmer, stirring until thickened.

In your stock jug, mix together the egg yolk, cream and mustard. Then gradually add to the sauce, stirring the whole time just for 2 minutes over a low heat. Taste, adjust the seasoning if you’d like to and then pour over the chicken breasts. Sprinkle over paprika to serve this quite simply delicious supper dish.

Inspired by…

Lynn Bedford Hall, New Creative Cuisine (thanks Helen)

How easy…

Simplicity itself and such a wonderful outcome

Grilled Plaice with Mustard and Tarragon Sauce, Asparagus and Peas

This is a really lovely, delicate and light fish supper. The sauce is quite piquant and, when tasted on its own, really rather strong. But, take a forkful that includes a little fish, greenery and sauce and the combination is fabulous: the sauce is the perfect foil for the delicate fish – it just all works brilliantly. And – bonus – you can make the sauce ahead, leaving just a few minutes cooking of the fish and vegetables just before you want to eat. It’s on the ‘favourites’ list for me!

Serves 4

What you need…

500g asparagus, trimmed

100g frozen peas

1.5kg plaice, filleted and cut into portions

Splash rapeseed oil

1 baby gem lettuce, shredded

Small knob of butter

Sea salt and black pepper, for seasoning

Olive oil to drizzle

for the sauce

100ml water

½ fish stockpot (I use Knorr)

Splash rapeseed oil

2 shallots, peeled and chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

4 tablespoons cider vinegar

100ml dry, still cider

2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard

100ml double cream

4 teaspoons chopped tarragon, stalks reserved

2 teaspoons capers

What to do…

First, blanch the asparagus. Pop in a deep frying pan of boiling, salted water and simmer vigorously for 2 minutes. Drain and set aside. Dry the frying pan – you’ll be using it again later.

Remove the frozen peas from the freezer and tip them out onto a plate to start defrosting.

In a jug, create some fish stock by pouring in 100ml water from your kettle and dissolving the fish stockpot, using a small balloon whisk. Set aside.

Now to the sauce: heat a splash of rapeseed oil in a pan over a moderate heat. Add the shallots and garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the cider vinegar and bring to the boil. Pour in the cider and fish stock and bubble furiously until the stock is reduced by half. Add the mustard, cream and tarragon stalks and simmer, reducing and thickening the sauce so that it coats the back of a spoon. Remove the tarragon stalks and discard. Stir in the capers and chopped tarragon. Set aside.

When you’re about ready to eat, preheat your grill to medium and either oil a baking tray or line it with Bake O Glide. Sprinkle salt all over the tray and lay your fish fillets on top, skin side up. Place under the grill and cook for 6 minutes, checking the last minute or two to avoid overcooking.

Meanwhile, put your sauce back on a very gentle heat, just to keep it warm.

Return to your frying pan and splash in the rapeseed oil. When hot, add the lettuce and wilt for 1 minute. Add the asparagus and peas with the knob of butter and warm through for a couple of minutes. Season to taste.

Remove the fish from the grill and leave to rest for a couple of minutes.

To serve, arrange the greenery on warmed plates and place the fish on top, skin side up. Drizzle with a little olive oil and then spoon the sauce around the fish. Don’t attack – it’s to be savoured but remember to get a little bit of everything on each forkful and enjoy the combined flavours – simply lovely!

Tips…

Instead of all that peeling and chopping, I buy Cooks’ Ingredients frozen chopped shallots and frozen chopped garlic from Waitrose – lovely and fresh and saves a lot of faffing about.

Inspired by…

Chef, Nathan Outlaw and my bro, who insisted that I couldn’t do this blog without this Nathan Outlaw book in my collection – good call, Martin!

How easy…

Really, really easy and a pleasure to make!