Tag Archives: neeps and tatties

Burns Night Supper: Haggis with Wonderful Whisky Sauce, Neeps & Tatties Mash with Parsley & Walnuts

The 6th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cook book, this is a wonderful way to serve haggis and the recipe definitely deserves a place in the book! Am sharing it today in case anyone is looking for inspiration for this Friday’s Burns Night. Cheers! Shlàinte! (hoping I’ve got that right: Scottish Gaelic equivalent – I’m sure I’ll be corrected if Google’s mislead me!)

I know haggis is not for everyone but we love it (and I’m afraid this picture does not do this fabulous dish any justice at all – will re-photograph this week!) I am devoted to the Simon Howie haggis brand – so tasty, peppery and perfectly balanced with a little spicy edge to it.  Served with the mash (with the added delicious dimension of the parsley and walnut oil) and the simply sumptuous sauce and ….it’s a celebration on the plate! Add a wee dram to the proceedings – an aged single malt if you can run to it – and you’re all set to celebrate Mr. Burns birthday or merely the excuse to indulge in haggis!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

2 x 454g Haggis, (we love the Simon Howie Scottish butcher brand)

30g butter

2 large shallots, finely chopped

250ml whisky (not expensive)

1 litre hot water from the kettle

2 x beef stockpots (I use Knorr)

4 teaspoons Dijon mustard

200ml double cream

for the mash

700g swede, peeled and chunked

650g potatoes, peeled and chunked

125g turnips, peeled and chunked

1 tablespoon butter

Sea salt and black pepper

25g fresh parsley

50g walnut pieces

Squeeze of lemon juice

100ml olive oil

What to do…

Cook both of the haggis according to the packet instructions – mine were to wrap in foil and pop in boiling water, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil and add the swede. Cook for 5 minutes then add the potatoes and turnips. Bring back to the boil and cook for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. Drain. Return the vegetables  to the saucepan, add the butter, season and either mash or whisk.  Pop the lid back on and keep warm.

In a mini chopper, chop the walnuts finely, add the parsley and chop again.  Tip in the lemon, pour in the oil and whizz the lot together. Set aside.

Whilst the veg is bubbling along, you can make the fan-dabby-dozi sauce. Melt the butter in medium pan over a moderate heat. Add the shallots and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until soft and golden. Increase the heat and add the whisky. Simmer for 5 – 10 minutes until reduced by three-quarters.

Dilute the beef stockpots into the hot water with the aid of a balloon whisk to create your beef stock. Pour the stock into the shallots and whisky, add the Dijon mustard and simmer for 10 minutes or until reduced by three-quarters again. Strain the sauce through a sieve and discard the shallots. Return the sauce to the pan and then add the cream, bring to a simmer and remove from the heat. Season, taste, adjust seasoning if needed. Set aside and keep warm.

Once your haggis’ are cooked, remove from the pan, discard the foil and peel back the plastic pouch. Cut the haggis into lovely chunky slices and serve onto warmed plates. Swirl the parsley and walnut oil into the mash or serve the mash and drizzle it over the top. Try not to be greedy and share the sauce between you all nicely.

Taste, enjoy, take a sip of your chosen wee dram. Repeat until plate and glass are both empty – shame!

Inspired by…

The birth of Robert Burns and then the Waitrose Weekend magazine!

How easy…

The haggis cooks itself, the sauce is a total joy to prepare and the mash is, well mash – not hard is it?