Tag Archives: Nigella Lawson

Trio of New Year’s Eve Puds

Looking forward to a lovely New Year’s Eve get together with friends, where we all contribute a course. Mine, happily, is puds so we have tried and tested recipes: Tiramisu, Luscious Lemon Pavlova (both courtesy of Nigella Lawson) and a half-sized 365 Chocolate Celebration Cake (which is not being shared with friends but devoured by my kids!) Cheers! And wishing everyone a lovely New Year’s Eve and a fabulous 2019 xx

For the recipe for each delectable pud, type in the pudding name in the search box in the top right hand corner of my home page.

Turkey Wellington

 

This is a brilliant way to serve turkey if you just fancy the breast – it can be made a day in advance (so therefore reducing the pressure if you’re entertaining a crowd), looks and tastes amazing; and the meat is really moist. Thumbs up all around really!

Serves 8-10

What you need…

for the cranberry sauce

The following fabulously festive, tangy sauce makes more than enough for the Turkey Wellington, to serve as its accompaniment at the meal and perhaps, to get out again with cold turkey and gammon slices the next day.

300g fresh cranberries

200g caster sugar

45ml Kirsch

75ml water

for the wellington

1.6 kg turkey breast, skin off

Sea salt and black pepper

Olive oil

1 large bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked

Cranberry sauce (as above)

6 rashers of smoked streaky bacon, roughly chopped

3 sprigs rosemary

600g mixed mushrooms, cleaned

1 knob butter

2 teaspoons truffle oil

1 egg, lightly beaten

What to do…

For the cranberry sauce, chuck all the ingredients into a saucepan on a moderate heat and let it all bubble away until the cranberries start to pop (about 10 minutes), stirring every now and then.

Squish the berries with the back of a wooden spoon and then transfer the whole lot to a serving bowl. Leave to cool (the sauce will thicken up to an almost jelly-like consistency). It is now ready to use. This can be made several days in advance – it keeps really well in the fridge for a week.

For your wellington, preheat your oven to 180°c / 350°f / gas 4.

Place the turkey breast upside down on a board and gently slice into the natural join of the breast muscle to open it out and make a pocket – Jamie says to just do this but for some reason I managed to make two pockets – it doesn’t really matter – read on and you’ll see why.  Rub olive oil all over the breast and particularly in the pocket(s). Season well and then sprinkle over half the thyme leaves, again ensuring that the pocket(s) get lots. Push cranberry sauce into the pocket(s), poking it in as far as it will go and filling up the space. Fold it back into shape and use cocktail sticks to ‘stitch’ the pocket seams together. If you can, roll the turkey breast up, swiss roll style. If it won’t comply, don’t worry about it – mine didn’t!

Either way, transfer the turkey breast to a baking tin making sure that it is covered in oil, salt and pepper. Sprinkle over the remaining thyme. Cover with foil and pop in the oven for 60-70 minutes until just cooked through – using a thermometer, you want it to be 72°c at the thickest point. Once cooked, set aside to cool.

Meanwhile, pop the bacon into your food processor and whizz until chopped up quite small. Splash some olive oil into a large frying pan on a medium heat and, using a spatula to get every last bit of bacon out of the processor bowl, add the bacon to the pan, cooking for 5-10 minutes until golden and really crispy. Strip the leaves from the rosemary sprigs and add to the pan for a minute. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon and rosemary from the pan and set aside to cool.

Pop the mushrooms in your food processor and whizz until they are chopped up quite small. Add another splash of oil to the frying pan if there isn’t enough fat left behind by the bacon, tip in the mushrooms, a splash of water and sauté for 10 minutes. Melt in the knob of butter and set the mushrooms side to cool. Once cooled, season with salt and pepper mix in the truffle oil. Taste the mushrooms to see if you want any more seasoning or oil.

When all the elements for the Turkey Wellington are cool, prepare for the assembly! Lightly butter a baking tin large enough for the breast.

Dust your work surface with flour and roll out one 500g block of puff pastry so that it is roughly 6cm bigger than the turkey breast all round. Roll out the second pastry block so that it is large enough to cover the breast and some.

On the smaller piece of pastry, spread out 1/3 of the mushrooms onto the middle to cover an area the same size as your turkey breast. Remove the cocktail sticks and place the breast on top. Spread the remaining mushrooms all over the top of the turkey breast, packing it in and smoothing it out as you go. Sprinkle on the crispy bacon and rosemary, then brush the edges of the pastry with beaten egg. Lay the second sheet of pastry over the top, gently mould it around the shape of the breast, pushing all of the air out and seal together. Trim the edges to around 4cm, then pull, twist, tuck and pinch the pastry together.

Brush the whole thing with beaten egg and shove it in the fridge uncovered  overnight until you’re ready to cook. Clear up, pour wine, relax.

When it’s time to indulge, cook at 180°c / 350°f / gas 4 for 50 – 60 minutes or until risen, puffy and beautifully golden. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes before carving this fabulous, all dressed up bird! Serve with turkey gravy and enjoy – you can’t fail to – absolutely gorgeous!

Inspired by…

Jamie Oliver showed me the Turkey Wellington recipe on his ‘Christmas with Bells On’ series and the Cranberry Sauce is care of Nigella.

How easy…

It is easy but it takes time and patience. The joy of it is preparation a day ahead of the actual eating – it makes it worth every moment of prep and it really is very delicious!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas Rocky Road

Wow! This stuff is just gorgeous and completely addictive. Crunchiness mixed with mellow, slightly melted mallow and the joy that is the mix of chocolate and golden syrup. Nuts, glace cherries and amaretti biscuits all combine to create something that can only be described as a seasonal joy! Just lovely!!!

Makes around 30+ bite-sized poppables!

What you need…

1 x 23 x 29cm-ish baking tin, lined with foil

250g dark chocolate, broken into chunks

150g milk chocolate, broken into chunks

175g butter

4 tablespoons golden syrup

200g amaretti bisuits (not the soft ones)

150g brazil nuts, shelled

150g glace cherries

125g mini marshmallows

Icing sugar for dusting

What to do…

In a large saucepan, tip in your chocolate chunks, butter and syrup and let the whole lot melt together over a low heat.

Meanwhile, in your food processor, fit the cutting blade and whizz the brazil nuts to rubble. Tip them out and set aside. Then do the same with your amaretti biscuits – it won’t take very long so just a quick whizz or you’ll get dust rather than rubble!

Once everything has melted, take the pan off the heat and tip in your nuts, amaretti, cherries and marshmallows. Gently stir the lot so that everything is evenly covered in the chocolate mix.

Tip the lot into your foil-lined tin. Run a spatula over the top so that it’s flatish. Pop in the fridge for 2 hours.

Invert your rocky road out of the foil-lined tin and cut into bite-sized ‘poppable’ squares. Stack up so it’s roughly rocky-road-mountain-like, dress with daft figures and dredge with icing sugar. Serve to everyone’s absolute delight! Just keep popping them in – it’ll be hard not to!!!!

Inspired by…

Nigella Lawson

How easy…

Child’s play!

Christmas Anglo Italian Trifle

No Christmas is complete without a little (or a lot) of trifle. I’ve tried many different recipes over the years but this one – inspired by Nigella, is my absolute favourite. And now for confession time: once the bowls are cleared and the left over trifle returned to the fridge, it will be seen complete with a sundae spoon…so I can just go in and have a large rounded spoonful on a whim! Disgusting habit, I know!!!!

If one could describe a dessert as voluptuous in flavour and totally indulgent, this would be it! Amaretti and sweetened mascarpone rather than cream give this trifle an Italian twist, something which is emphasised by the Limoncello that it is laced with. Definitely naughty but difficult to say no to a second helping. This Anglo Italian Trifle is best enjoyed with a group of rowdy, hedonistic friends after a dribbly lunch or dinner or as the perfect alternative (or addition) to Christmas Pudding.

Serves 12

What you need…

1 x pretty, 2-litre glass trifle bowl

8 trifle sponges

1 jar of blackcurrant jam

100g Amaretti biscuits, plus a handful for the topping

300ml Limoncello

600g frozen fruits, defrosted: summer fruits work well

2 eggs, separated

100g caster sugar

750g mascarpone cheese

What to do…

Split the trifle sponges and make into sandwiches with the jam; then wodge them into your trifle bowl. Crush the Amaretti biscuits in your hand and sprinkle them all over the trifle sponges then pour over 180ml Limoncello.

Tip the fruit over the sponges and Amaretti, perhaps arranging the bigger attractive fruit around the edges – for presentation purposes – you’ll be able to see them through the glass.

In a small bowl, whisk the egg whites until stiff. Put to one side.

In a large bowl, use an electric whisk to whisk together the egg yolks and caster sugar until the mixture is thick and smooth . Still whisking, slowly add 60ml of Limoncello, creating a light, moussey mixture. Whisk in the mascarpone until everything is smoothly combined. Add the remaining Limoncello and give the mixture a final whiz with the electric whisk. Tip in the egg white and fold in with a balloon whisk – this makes the mascarpone ‘cream’ lovely and airily light.

Dollop the mascarpone ‘cream’ on top of the fruit and gently, spread it a little, creating little soft peaks.

Cover the trifle and and pop in the fridge overnight, allowing all the flavours to gather and the Limoncello to permeate the fruit, sponges and Amaretti, mingling with the fruit to create sheer yumminess.

About one hour before you want to plunge the spoon into your delectable dessert, take it out of the fridge to come to room temperature. Just before serving, crush the remaining Amaretti biscuits and scatter over the top of the trifle. (We have also decorated our with birthday candles and made it a very special birthday cake). Your Anglo Italian Trifle is now ready to be demolished! Just gorgeous!

Tips…

Change the fruit to reflect the season.

Keep tasting the mascarpone cream as you add the Limoncello – I like my trifles quite boozy – you may want a little less alcohol….or perhaps a tad more!

Inspired by…

Nigella Lawson

How easy…

Dead easy: no cooking, more of an assembly job with a bit of whisking but it looks and tastes spectacular!

Luscious Lemon Pavlova

Wow! I’m not a great fan of lemon curd (but made my own which is waaaaay nicer than shop-bought) but was drawn to this recipe anyway. The fabulous crisp, sweet crust of the meringue with its soft, light centre contrasts superbly with the sweet but tart lemon curd and the cloud-like whipped cream that tops it. A sprinkling of lemon zest and toasted almond slivers completes this luscious pudding that Nigella quite rightly describes as a ‘triumph’ – easy and glorious – give it a go!

Serves: 8-12

What you need…

1 x baking tray, lined with baking parchment

6 happy egg whites

375g caster suga

2½ teaspoons cornflour

Grated zest of 2 lemons, separated

Juice of 1 lemon

50g flaked almonds

300ml double cream

325g jar lemon curd (I used homemade but shop bought is fine)

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4/.

Using a handheld electric whisk, beat the egg whites until satiny peaks form, then beat in the sugar one large spoonful at a time until the meringue is stiff and shiny.

Sprinkle over the cornflour, then the zest of one lemon and 2 teaspoons of lemon juice.

Using a balloon whisk, gently fold in until everything is thoroughly mixed together. Mound onto your lined baking tray in a fat circle approximately 23cm in diameter, smoothing the top with a spatula.

Pop into your oven, then immediately turn the temperature down to 150˚C / 300˚f / gas 2 and cook for 1 hour.

Switch off your oven put leave your rather gorgeous pavlova in there for a further 30 minutes but with the door completely open – this will stop it cracking too quickly as it cools down.

Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely.

Just before you’re ready to indulge, slide your pavlova onto a pretty serving plate.

Toast the flaked almonds, by frying them in a dry pan over a moderate heat until they have started to colour, shaking the pan regularly. Don’t take your eyes off them – this takes just a minute or so and they burn really easily. When they’re done, remove to a cold plate so that they don’t carry on cooking.

Whip the cream until soft peaks are formed (or as Nigella says, ‘has a soft voluptuousness about it!!!!!) and set aside.

If your lemon curd is shop-bought, put it into a bowl and beat it with a wooden spoon to loosen it a little and then taste it, adding a squeeze of juice if it’s too sweet.

With a light hand, a glad heart and a spatula (these are her exact words and whilst I normally re-write the recipes from scratch, this somewhat gloriously ridiculous line HAD to be left in) spread the lemon curd on top of the meringue base. Top with the whipped cream, peaking it as if it were a meringue topping and then sprinkle with the remaining lemon zest followed by the flaked almonds.

I should say serve, but honestly, once you’ve tasted the first mouthful, you’ll want to attack and devour the rest – an absolute triumph of a pudding!!!!!

Inspired by…

Nigella Lawson

How easy…

Really easy and it is rather a show-stopper of a pud for very little effort!