Tag Archives: Pudding

Rhubarb Crumble with Nutmeg and Pistachios

I adore rhubarb and am loving the fact that recipes using the stuff currently abound. I was drawn to this one because of the inherent feeling of comfort that comes with a crumble pudding and because of its sheer simplicity. Then to the flavour: that fabulous tart sweetness that is unique to rhubarb, topped with a lovely, gently spiced crunchy crumble mixture that is an absolutely superb foil to the sweet filling – perfect for a cold winter’s day and ridiculously quick and easy: fast comfort food!

Serves 6

What you need…

for the rhubarb

1 x 2-litre ovenproof dish, buttered

800g rhubarb, trimmed and chunked into 3cm lengths

75g golden caster sugar

2 tablespoons self-raising flour

for the crumble

150g self-raising flour

150g golden caster sugar

150g ground pistachios

1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

150g unsalted butter, chilled and chunked

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 200˚c / 400˚ / gas 6.

Toss the rhubarb in the sugar and self-raising flour and arrange in the bottom of your ovenproof dish.

Tip all of the crumble ingredients into your food processor whizz to crumbs that are just starting to stick together. Scatter evenly over the rhubarb. Pop into the oven and bake for 30-35 minutes or until the top is golden and crisp and the luscious juices are starting to bubble up the sides.

Serve with a dollop of ice-cream, a smothering of warm custard or a swirl of double cream. Enjoy this stupendously simple, delicious pud!

Inspired by…

You magazine (Mail on Sunday)

How easy…


Mojito Cheesecakes

Quick and easy, light and refreshing, these elegant little lovelies also combine the wonderful contrast that is the almond-flavoured amaretti biscuits with the sharp lime and of course, the essential boozy kick of the rum – fab!

Makes 4 large ones or 6 petite ones (no prizes for guessing which ones I made!)

What you need…

Cocktail glasses or ramekins in which to serve

25g butter

60g amaretti biscuits, roughly crushed

100g full fat cream cheese

150ml double cream

2 tablespoons white rum

25g icing sugar

Juice and finely grated zest of 1 large lime

Extra grated lime zest or mint leaves, to decorate

What to do…

Melt the butter and then tip all but 2 tablespoons of the amaretti biscuits into the butter and stir to combine. Divide the butter-coated amaretti between your glasses/ramekins. Lightly press down.

In a large bowl, use an electric handheld whisk to beat together the cream cheese and cream. Add the rum, icing sugar and lime zest. Whisk again to combine. Tip in the lime juice and whisk again – the mixture will instantly thicken. Use a spoon to divide the filling between your glasses/ramekins.

Sprinkle the remaining amaretti crumbs over each cheesecake and then decorate with lime zest or mint leaves.

Pop in the fridge to chill. (They will also be fine for up to 2 days). Serve probably a little under room temperature – absolutely fabulous!

Inspired by…

The legend that is Mary Berry

How easy…


Baked Lemon Curd Syrup Sponges with Brandy Custard

Perfect for this time of year: hot, delightfully sticky yet light individual little sponges with a gorgeous gooey middle and all topped up with brandy-infused custard – almost a winter essential, I’d say! We had ours to round off a Sunday Roast – bang on!

What you need…

6 x dariole moulds, liberally buttered and lined with a disk of non-stick baking paper

1 x baking tray

115g butter, softened

115g light muscovado sugar

2 large, happy eggs

115g self-raising flour

1 handful of panko breadcrumbs (or ordinary breadcrumbs will work just as well)

Grated zest of 1 lemon and juice of ½

Grated zest of 1 orange and juice of ½

6 tablespoons golden syrup

1 tablespoon brandy, plus 1½ tablespoons for the custard

6 rounded teaspoons lemon curd

500ml fresh custard

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4.

Into your food processor tip the butter, sugar, eggs and flour and whizz until combined. Chuck in the breadcrumbs and half the zest and pulse to incorporate.

In a small bowl, mix together the remaining zest, juice, golden syrup and 1 tablespoon brandy. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the mixture into the bottom of each dariole mould, reserving the rest.

Divide the sponge mixture evenly between the moulds and then plop 1 teaspoon lemon curd into the middle of each (it will merge with the sponge).

Put the moulds onto a baking tray and pop into your oven to bake for 30 minutes until risen and golden.

Meanwhile, use a saucepan to gently warm the custard, stirring through it 1½ tablespoons brandy.

To serve, invert each dariole mould onto a plate, tapping the bottom with the handle of metal knife if the sponges need a little encouragement to plop out. Drizzle over the remaining syrup and serve with a big smile and the boozy custard. Cold winter evenings definitely have some benefits!

Inspired by…

Delicious magazine

How easy…

Remarkably easy and I love that fact that you can do most of the prep before you sit down to dinner.

Vanilla and Amaretti Cheesecakes with Balsamic-Infused Strawberries (Revisited)

Right then, for reasons unknown, there are some people (Ben) who don’t like Christmas Pudding so I feel that this year, an alternative little delectable pud needs to be offered. These little darlings are the perfect solution. Firstly, they can be made one month in advance and frozen, with just the finishing touches required at the festive feast. And secondly, they are completely wow!

The rich, smooth creaminess of the cheesecakes are perfectly contrasted by the warm, sweet, lusciousness of the strawberries: their flavour emphasised by sweetened balsamic vinegar (most unexpected). They look fabulous, are so easy to make and taste out of this world! Only problem is, I might have to have one of these AND Christmas pudding…

Serves 4

What you need…

8 x chefs’ rings (like tall cookie cutters), 5.5cm diametre x 6cm deep (easily available online)

10 Amaretti biscuits

250g full fat cream cheese

125g caster sugar

125g crème fraiche

240ml double cream

1 vanilla pod, seeds scraped out

for the strawberries

200g strawberries, hulled and quartered

2 teaspoons caster sugar

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

What to do…

In a large bowl, tip in your cream cheese, caster sugar, crème fraiche, double cream and vanilla seeds. Whisk until smooth and thickened up so that the whisks leave a distinct trail.

Place the chefs’ rings on a flat plate, lined with Bake O Glide or parchment paper. Spoon the cheesecake mixture into each ring, pushing the mixture down to make sure there are no gaps and filling the rings to about half way up (this recipe makes for quite little cheesecakes but in my view, they are perfectly proportioned).

Pop them in the fridge for at least 2 hours to set.

If you are having friends around for dinner, you can do this bit in the morning and leave the rest until you are about ready to serve.

If you are preparing them for waaaaay in advance, cover them with cling film and pop in the freezer until the day you want to indulge and then place them in the fridge to defrost slowly.

Just before you are ready to serve, pop your Amaretti biscuits into a plastic zip-lock bag and using a rolling pin, crush them inside the bag to create a dusting.

Remove the cheesecakes from the fridge and set aside at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Place the Amaretti crumbs on a plate and then dip each of the cheesecakes in their chefs’ rings into the crumbs, 2 – 3 times if necessary – to make sure that the bottom is thoroughly covered. Sprinkle the crumbs evenly over the top of each one as well.

Then, hold your breath (!) and lightly shake each cheesecake from the chefs’ ring onto its serving plate. Despite your total disbelief, it will gently drop down the ring and then plop out beautifully onto your serving plate – looking gorgeous!

Meanwhile, heat a saucepan over a high heat. Tip in the strawberries and sugar and cook, stirring continually for about 1 minute. Pour over the balsamic and cook for a further 1 minute. Yup, that’s it!!!!

Spoon some of the strawberries onto the plate alongside the cheesecake. Absolutely delicious – the strawberries contrast the cheesecake perfectly, both elements enhancing the flavour of the other. Serve your vanilla and Amaretti cheesecake with balsamic-infused strawberries together with a wee glass of Disaronno Italian liqueur or a lovely little dessert wine to complete the indulgence! An absolute treat to be enjoyed any time of the year, not just at Christmas!!!

Inspired by…

Stuart Gillies, with James Martin on Saturday Kitchen

How easy…

Really easy, the only nervy bit is when you’re watching the cheesecake slowly drop through the chefs’ rings but be patient and it will be fine!


Christmas Pud Revisited

Following on from the Christmassy theme started properly yesterday, it’s not too late to rustle up a rather lovely Christmas Pudding to grace your festive table in just over one month. Rich, boozy and another great recipe inspired by Delia Smith (have yet to take a good picture with the flaming brandy – will try again this year!)

For the full recipe, type ‘Christmas’ into the search button in the top right hand corner of my home page.

Cumberland Rum Nicky

Having seen this on last week’s Great British Bake Off, I had to give it a go and….and it’s absolutely delicious! It reminds me of mince pies but has a richer, boozier and sweeter flavour and is thoroughly moreish. And then there’s the rum butter – I didn’t have the full 75ml that Mr. Hollywood recommends and thank God – with just 50ml, it was still incredibly boozy and incredibly good – an excellent accompaniment to this fab pud! Definitely give this one a go!

Serves 8 – 10

What you need…

1 x 20cm pie dish, about 3cm deep, liberally buttered

for the filling

225g dates, coarsely chopped

100g dried apricots, coarsely chopped

50g stem ginger syrup, drained and finely chopped

50ml dark rum

50g soft dark brown sugar

50g unsalted butter, cut into 1–2cm cubes

for the sweet shortcrust pastry

200g plain flour

2 tablespoons icing sugar

100g cold unsalted butter, cut into 1cm cubes

1 large, happy egg, lightly beaten

1 teaspoon lemon juice

for the rum butter

100g unsalted butter, softened

225g soft light brown sugar

50ml dark rum

What to do…

Mix all the filling ingredients, except the butter, together in a bowl. Set aside

while you make the pastry.

Now, turn to making the pastry: tip the flour and icing sugar into your food processor and whizz together. Add in the cubed butter and whizz until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Tip the mixture into a mixing bowl.

Mix the egg with the lemon juice and two tablespoons of cold water. Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the egg mixture. Using a table knife, work the liquid into the flour to bring the pastry together. If it seems too dry, add a splash more water. When the dough begins to stick together, use your hands to gently knead it into a ball. Wrap in cling film and rest in the fridge for at least 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.

Once the dough has rested, cut it into two pieces, roughly one-third and two-thirds. Roll out the larger piece on a lightly floured work surface. Line your pie dish with the pastry, leaving any excess pastry hanging over the edge. Tip the filling into the pastry case, spreading it evenly and dot with the butter.

Roll out the remaining pastry and cut it into eight long strips, roughly 1cm wide. On a sheet of baking parchment, use the pastry strips to create a lattice with four strips going each way, passing them under and over each other.

Dampen the edge of the pastry in the tin with water, then invert the lattice from the paper onto the tart. Press the ends of the strips to the pastry base to secure.

Bake for 15 minutes, then turn the oven down to 160˚c / 325˚f / gas 3 and cook for a further 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, for the rum butter, use an electric handheld whisk to beat together the butter and sugar, then gradually beat in the rum. Pop into the fridge until needed.

Serve the tart hot, with a spoonful of rum butter. Absolutely, fabulously delicious!

Inspired by…

Paul Hollywood and The Great British Bake Off

How easy…

Really easy and an absolute joy to make.

Chocolate and Coffee Mousse with Rum

Silky, smooth and deeply, decadently chocolatey with a hint of rum, these very grown up chocolate mousses takes just a few minutes to knock up and even less time to demolish! Very yummy and deliciously naughty!

Makes 6

What you need…

125g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), chunked

25ml espresso coffee

1 tablespoon rum

3 large, happy eggs, separated

1 tablespoon maple syrup

What to do…

Use a handheld electric whisk to beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Set aside.

Tip the chocolate into a heatproof bowl, add the espresso and rum and then sit the bowl in a steamer over a pan of boiling water (bain marie).

As soon as the chocolate has melted, take the bowl out of the bain marie and allow the chocolate mixture to cool for 2 minutes. Stir in the egg yolks and maple syrup.

Use a metal balloon whisk to fold 1 spoonful of egg whites into the chocolate mixture. Tip in the remainder of the egg white and then very gently fold into the mixture, again using the balloon whisk.

Divide the mixture between 6 pretty glasses, cups or bowls and pop into the fridge for 2 hours.

If you fancy, you can decorate your mousses with a little grated white chocolate, but otherwise just serve them as the come – deliciously naughty!

Inspired by…

Kirstie Allsopp

How Easy…

Really, really easy and quick.



End-of-Summer Pudding

Delicious, fresh and totally yummy: this stupendously easy pud is jam-packed with fruit and the flavours of summer-turning-to-autumn. A delightful Chambord-infused juice completes the joy and a dollop of crème fraîche is the perfect accompaniment. Seconds please!

Serves 6

What you need…

1 x 700ml pudding basin

6-8 slices stale sourdough bread, crusts removed

600g mixed soft fruit (I used strawberries, raspberries and blackberries)

100g caster sugar

2 tablespoons Chambord (black raspberry liqueur)

What to do…

Remove the stalks and/or stones from the fruit and tip into a wide heavy-based pan. Add the sugar, bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to low, cooking for a further 2 minutes or until the fruit is starting to soften and release juice.

Meanwhile, line the base and sides of your basin with bread to cover completely. Trim the bread if necessary so that the slices fit closely together. You should be left with 2 remaining slices, which will be used for the lid.

Use a slotted spoon to remove the fruit from its juices and pop the fruit into the basin. Measure out 4 tablespoons of the juice and tip it into a screw top jar. Set aside. Drizzle the remaining pan juice evenly over the fruit. Cover with the remaining bread (trim to fit). Wrap the whole basin in cling film and then put something heavy on the top (e.g. a small plate with a tin on the top).

Pop into the fridge chill and set overnight.

When you’re ready to serve, add the Chambord to the screw top jar, pop on the lid and shake like mad to mix together the liqueur with the sweetened fruit juice. Slide a palette knife around the inside edge of the basin, pop a serving plate on the top and then invert the lot – your gorgeous pudding will plop out delightfully onto the plate. Pour the Chambord-infused juice evenly over the pudding and serve this luscious pudding with a dollop of crème fraîche – just yummy!

End of Summer Pud p w

Inspired by…

Richard Bertinet, Delicious magazine

How easy…


Pineapple Steeped in Kirsch

I don’t suppose I can really call this a recipe, but it’s definitely worth sharing. This dessert is gorgeously refreshing and tangy BUT with a definite kick – the sweet, juicy flavour of the pineapple combined with the subtle (but extremely alcoholic) taste of the Kirsch cherry liqueur is simply sublime. A lovely dessert, summer or winter, but especially good after something really spicy, e.g. a hot curry.

What you need…

1 ripe pineapple

80ml Kirsch liqueur

Sprig of mint, to garnish (optional)

What to do…

Cut the pineapple in half lengthways, remove the flesh and discard the core. Chunk the fruit into bite-sized pieces. Tip the pineapple chunks into a bowl, pour over the Kirsch and cover with cling film. Give the whole lot a good shake and then pop into the fridge overnight to allow the wonderful flavours to develop.

Serve the Kirsch-steeped pineapple chunks on their own or with a dollop of double cream or natural yogurt. That’s it – couldn’t be easier and very well worth the minimal effort!


You might want to shake the bowl every now and then whilst it’s ‘gathering’ in the fridge, just to make sure the Kirsch is evenly distributed.

A little bit about Kirsch…

Produced mainly in Germany, but also in Switzerland and the Alsace region of France, Kirsch’s full name is kirsch wasser (pronounced vasser), meaning cherry water. Originating from the Black Forest, in the Southern area of the country, it’s an eau de vie (a type of brandy) made by double-distilling the fermented juice of the sour morello cherry. As it’s not aged in contact with wood (barrels are coated with wax to prevent this happening), kirsch is clear in colour, and the flavour subtley hints at its cherry origins, rather than being sweet and cloying.

Inspired by…

Absolutely no idea! Have been knocking this little one up for years!

How easy…


Cherry and Almond Cloud Cake

What a fantastic showoff of a summer cake this is: light, sweet sponge layers together with millions of fresh, juicy ripe cherries snuggling in light cloud-like cream: totally OTT, totally audacious and totally gorgeous!!!!! Bake when the cherries are in season and plentiful – cheap from the local market.

Serves 12 -16 lucky people

What you need…

2x 20cm deep cake tins, liberally buttered and lined with baking parchment

8 happy eggs, separated

320g golden caster sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Grated zest of 1 lemon

320g ground almonds

50g plain flour

Pinch of salt

600ml double cream

150g Greek yogurt

2 tablespoons icing sugar, plus extra for decorating

750g cherries, stoned and halved

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 170˚c / 325˚f / gas 3.

Into your food processor, tip the egg yolks and 160g of the sugar. Whizz for 3-4 minutes, until pale and thickened. Add the vanilla essence and lemon zest and whizz to combine.

Tip the egg whites into a large mixing bowl and use an electric handheld whisk to beat until stiff peaks are formed. Add 3 tablespoons of the remaining sugar and whisk again until stiff and shiny. Tip in the rest of the sugar and whisk to incorporate. Rinse off your whisks – you’ll need them again in a bit.

Using a large metal spoon, mix a large spoonful of the egg whites into the yolk mixture to loosen. Then tip all of the yolk mixture into the whites and use a balloon whisk to gently fold together. Then, gently fold in the ground almonds, flour and salt.

Divide the cake mixture between your two prepared tins and pop in the oven to bake for 40 – 50 minutes, until the sponge comes away from the sides of the tin. Remove and leave to cool in the tins for 10 minutes; then carefully invert the sponges onto a cooling rack, remove the baking parchment and cool completely.

Halve each sponge horizontally (I hate this bit – use a sharp serrated knife, take your time and keep checking that you’re cutting straight – it’ll be fine).

Using your electric handheld whisk, lightly whip together the cream, yogurt and icing sugar. Taste and add more sugar if you’d like it a bit sweeter.

Assembly time! Place one of cake base halves on a serving place and spread with ¼ cream. Scatter with ¼ cherries. Repeat with the other three sponge layers, ending with a cloud of cream and flourish of cherries. To serve, sprinkle with icing sugar and then indulge – prepare to get messy!

Serving suggestion…

Serve outside on a warm summer’s day in the dappled shade of a large tree; fizz chillin’ at your side, all with good friends and lots of laughter – perfect!

Inspired by…

Waitrose magazine but the cake was created for Suzy’s ‘21st’ birthday – I needed the excuse of a gathering to create such a large cake – even WE can’t eat that much cake!!!

How easy…

Very easy – takes a little time though. But it’s soooooooo worth it. x

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