Tag Archives: soup

Chilled Cucumber and Crayfish Soup

Delicate and delightfully refreshing, this velvety chilled soup is perfect for a summer lunch with friends. The light, subtle flavour of the cucumber is uplifted with lemon and chilli oils and the added luxury of crayfish tails makes this little number a surprisingly lovely addition to a sunshiny day! It can also be cooked a day in advance of eating – perfect for summertime relaxation with friends and a bottle of crisp white!

What you need…

2 x screw top jars with lids

500g hot water from the kettle

1 vegetable stockpot (I use Knorr)

4 tablespoons olive oil

Squeeze of lemon juice

1 teaspoon dried, crushed chillis

100g unsalted butter

1 onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 cucumbers, halved, deseeded and finely diced

1 tablespoon dill, finely chopped plus extra to garnish

1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves, finely chopped

400ml full-fat natural, creamy yogurt

Sea salt and black pepper

240g crayfish tails (yum!)

What to do…

First make a vegetable stock by using a balloon whisk to help dissolve the stockpot into the hot water from the kettle. Set aside.

Next, into one jar pour 2 tablespoons olive oil and a good squeeze of lemon juice. Pop on the lid, shake like mad and set aside. Likewise, with the second jar, pour in two tablespoons of olive oil and tip in the chillis. Pop on the lid, shake and set aside.

To the main event: melt the butter in a large saucepan over a low heat, tip in the onion and garlic and cook gently for 6-8 minutes or until softened but not brown. Tip in the cucumber and again cook gently for another 5 minutes – the aroma is quite delightful!

Pour in the stock and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool for 15 minutes. Transfer to your blender, tip in the herbs and whizz until smooth. Set aside to cool completely and then gently stir in the yogurt. Season, taste and season again if necessary. Chill for anything between 2 hours and overnight.

When ready to serve, ladle the chilled soup into bowls, scatter in the crayfish tails, drizzle over the lemon and chilli-infused oils and garnish with a few sprigs of dill. Delightful!

Inspired by…

Waitrose.com

How easy…

Extremely and the fact that you can make it ahead is even better!

 

 

 

 

Spiced Haddock Chowder

Real comfort food this, it’s a thick, chunky and really flavoursome soup – an ideal lunch or supper that will surely brighten even the coldest and most miserable winter’s day – also dead easy to make!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 haddock fillets

568ml (1 pint) milk

4 bay leaves

10 peppercorns

25g butter

1 large onion, chopped

1 carrot, roughly chopped

½ swede, roughly chopped

1 large potato, peeled and roughly chopped

1 teaspoon mustard seeds

1 teaspoon turmeric

1 tablespoon plain flour

2 tablespoons flatleaf parsley, chopped

What to do…

Cut the haddock fillets in half and pop them into a saucepan with the milk, bay leaves and peppercorns. Bring to the boil and then pop the lid on, removing from the heat and leaving the flavours to infuse.

Melt the butter and then sauté the onion until just soft. Add the carrot, swede and potato together with the mustard seeds and turmeric and sauté the lot over a moderate heat, stirring the whole time, until lightly browned.

Use a slotted spoon to remove the haddock from the milk.

Scatter the flour over the vegetables cook over a moderate heat, stirring to evenly incorporate. Gradually pour in the infused milk, stirring as you go and then turn up the heat to create a thick sauce. Cook the vegetables in this sauce until they are soft (15 minutes or so).

Break up the haddock into bite-sized chunks and tip it into the pan to warm through.

Serve in rustic bowls (it’s that kind of a soup) with a little chopped parsley to garnish. Enjoy this soup that has the same warming effect as snuggling up in a warm blanket but with the added zing of a little spiciness.

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater

How easy…

A very easy-going, relaxed recipe, rather like the man himself

Broccoli and Stilton Soup

Baby, it’s cold outside but this soup is a real winter warmer! It’s also simplicity itself and is absolutely lovely, exuding the deep, rich flavours of the Stilton which are beautifully foiled by the broccoli – simply lovely and ridiculously simple to make. If you’ve got any leftover Stilton, this is definitely the way to go. I’m going to make sure that we regularly have some leftover Stilton!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 tablespoons rapeseed oil

1 onion, chopped finely

2 sticks celery, sliced

1 leek, sliced

2 medium potatoes, diced

1 knob butter

1 litre boiling water from the kettle

2 x chicken stockpots (I use Knorr)

1 head broccoli, roughly chopped

140g Stilton, roughly chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

Heat the rapeseed oil in a large saucepan over a moderate heat. Add the onions and cook until soft. Add the celery, leek, potato and a knob of butter; stir everything together until the butter has melted. Pop on the lid and let the lot sweat for 5 minutes.

In a jug, use a balloon whisk to dissolve the chicken stock pots into the boiling water to create a litre of chicken stock.

Remove the vegetable saucepan lid and pour in the stock and any tough, chunky bits of broccoli stalk. Cook for 10 minutes until all the vegetables are soft.

Add in the rest of the broccoli and cook for another 5 minutes. Tip your soup into a blender and whizz until smooth. Return the soup to your saucepan and add the Stilton, stirring it gently over a low heat until the cheese has melted. Taste, season, taste again and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

Divide between 4 bowls and enjoy this wonderful winter warmer treat of a soup! (Or share between two of you and freeze the rest for another day)

Inspired by…

BBC Good Food

How easy…

Dead easy! I carried on unpacking shopping and sorting out admin whilst it cooked itself!

Creamy Artichoke Soup with Parmesan-Coated Peelings

Simply gorgeous! I’ve had this recipe for a couple of years but had difficulty locating the lumpy bumpy tubers called artichokes. Spotted in Waitrose this week, I thought I’d give this a go. Having never tried artichokes, I had no idea what to expect so I was delighted to taste a gorgeous soup that is distinctive, smooth and elegant. We had it for supper but it would make a fabulous (and easy) dinner party starter – give it a go!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking sheet, lined with baking parchment

Juice ½ lemon

500g Jerusalem artichokes

2 teaspoons rapeseed oil

25g butter

1 onion, roughly chopped

1 x 140g floury potato, roughly chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

600ml boiling water from the kettle

2 chicken stockpots (I use Knorr)

3 tablespoons double cream

1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese, finely grated

1 rosemary sprig, leaves picked and finely chopped

What to do…

Half-fill a large bowl with tap water and squeeze in the lemon juice. Peel the artichokes and cut them into chunks, chucking them into the lemony water. Toss the peelings into a separate bowl, add the oil and stir in. That’s the prep done!

Melt the butter in a large saucepan and add the onion, potato, sea salt and black pepper. Drain the artichokes and tip them in as well. Cover the pan and sweat the vegetables over a low heat with the lid on for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Preheat your oven to 200°c / 400°f / gas 6.

Use a balloon whisk to dissolve the stockpots into the boiling water and then pour it over the vegetables. Pop the lid back on and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until the artichokes are tender.

Tip the lot into your blender and whizz until smooth. Tip back into the saucepan, stir in the cream, taste and adjust the seasoning to suit.

Meanwhile, prepare the artichoke peelings to garnish. Spread the oiled peelings over your baking tray and pop in the oven for 5 minutes. Turn them over and scatter with Parmesan and rosemary. Cook for a further 5 minutes.

Pour this gorgeous soup into four bowls and garnish with the Parmesan peelings – just divine!

What Jerusalem artichokes are all about…

From the sunflower family and also known as sunchokes, these tubers grow underground and look like large, lumpy, bumpy knobs of ginger. They taste slightly nutty and smoothly savoury: a cross between an artichoke heart and the best potato you’ve ever had!

Inspired by…

bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Really easy; the only tricky and somewhat time-consuming bit is peeling the artichokes because they’re so knobbly.

 

 

Chilled Lemon Grass and Coriander Vichyssoise

 

This is an absolutely delightful chilled soup: perfect for a starter at a summer lunch or supper party when the weather is hot. It’s light and refreshing, fragrant and elegant; and the combination of the coriander with lemon grass produce a really lovely but delicate Thai flavour. There’s no coconut milk in it, which I was surprised about, but the inclusion of new potatoes provide the necessary substance without the cloyiness that you sometimes experience with coconut milk. Really delicious – give it a go!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 handfuls fresh coriander

4 lemon grass stems

4 spring onions

50g butter

2 medium onions, chopped

275g new potatoes, chunked

150ml milk

Sea salt and black pepper

What to do…

First of all, you need to make a stock. In a large saucepan, pour 850ml water. Pick the leaves from the coriander and chuck the stalks into the water, saving the leaves for later. Likewise, with the spring onions and lemon grass: trim the ends, remove the outer skin, chucking those bits that you would normally discard into the water as well. Pop a lid on the pan, and bring the water to boil before reducing the heat to gently simmer the ‘stock’ for 30 minutes – it is this process that provides the soup with real depth of flavour.

Meanwhile, chop up your lemon grass and spring onions.

Strain the stock into a jug, discarding the trimmings. Wipe out your saucepan and then add the butter, melting it over a low heat. Add the lemon grass, onions and potatoes, pop the lid back on the pan and gently ‘sweat’ the vegetables over a low heat for 10 minutes. Then, add the stock, milk and three quarters of the coriander leaves (retaining the rest for the garnish). Season with sea salt and black pepper, pop the lid back on, turn the heat up so that the soup just starts to boil and then reduce the heat again and let the soup simmer gently for 25 minutes.

Leave the soup to cool and then chuck the lot into your food processor/blender and whizz until smooth. If you want a really smooth, silky soup, strain it through a sieve into a jug. If not, just tip it from the processor into the jug. Cover with cling film and keep in the fridge until you’re ready to enjoy this lovely soup.

Pour into bowls and sprinkle over the remaining coriander leaves and chopped spring onions: delightfully delicious!

Inspired by…

Delia Smith

How easy…

An absolute sinch – takes some time but you can walk away to do other things whilst it’s gathering its flavours. Also, you can make it the day before and keep it in the fridge until you’re ready to garnish and serve: no hassle!

Chilled out Salmorejo Cordobés

Originating from Cordoba in Andalucia, southern Spain, this is almost more of a purée than a soup, including bread to add substance and richly flavoured with garlic and tomato. Served cold, it is thicker and creamier than gazpacho and is a lovely pink-orange colour. It’s refreshing and tasty, delivers ‘Mediterranean with a kick’ with every spoonful and is somehow luxurious. Garnished with Serrano ham and chopped boiled egg, it also has a bit more about than just a chilled out soup! If we ever have a boiling hot day, this makes for a delicious lunch dish or starter.

Serves 4

What you need…

240ml water

1 dessertspoon salt

75g stale baguette

5 large/plum tomatoes, roughly chopped

1 small onion, chopped

30ml sherry wine vinegar

1½ dessertspoons fresh lemon juice

1 garlic clove, chopped

180ml virgin olive oil

2 hard boiled eggs, chopped

4 slices Serrano ham, chopped

What to do…

Tip the water into a bowl with the salt, stir to mix together and then add the bread, soaking for 30 minutes.

Squeeze the excess water from the bread and set the bread aside.

Tip the tomatoes, onion, sherry wine vinegar, lemon juice and garlic into a blender and whizz until smooth. Add the bread and whizz again until smooth. With the machine still running, gradually add the olive oil – the soup will now turn its lovely pink-orange colour. Pop the finished soup into the fridge for at least 2 hours (it will keep for a day). Divide into four small bowls and garnish with the boiled eggs and ham – deliciously refreshing with more than a hint of the Med!

Salmorejo Cordobes Close up wInspired by…

bonappetit.com

How easy…

Just a bit of blending – one very chilled out soup!

Crab and Prawn Coconut Soup

I love this crab and prawn coconut soup: it’s delightfully light, tasty and fragranced but also enough about it to pass as a substantial starter or light main course. The seafood flavours are beautifully emphasised by the influences of the lemon grass, fish sauce and coriander – it’s absolutely lovely and you can knock it up in a flash – definitely going on my ‘supper party starters’ list, so if you’re coming around, expect it – you’ll enjoy!

Serves 2

What you need…

Splash rapeseed oil

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

2cm fresh ginger, peeled and then grated

1 lemon grass stem, trimmed and sliced

Pinch hot chilli powder

200g cooked crab meat

500ml boiling water from the kettle

1 fish stockpot (I use Knorr)

200g coconut milk

1 tablespoon fish sauce

225g raw, peeled prawns

2 spring onions, trimmed and sliced

Juice of ½ lemon

Good handful chopped fresh coriander

What to do…

In a jug, pop in your stockpot and then pour in 500ml boiling water from the kettle. Whisk with either a fork or small balloon whisk to dissolve and then set your stock aside.

In a large saucepan over a moderate heat, splash in the oil and add the garlic, ginger, lemon grass and chilli powder. Cook until golden. Tip in the crab meat, stock, coconut milk and fish sauce. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the crab meat and the prawns and cook until the prawns are just pink. Then add the spring onions, lemon juice and coriander. Enjoy this lovely, light fragrant soup – quite delicious!

Inspired by…

Rachel Allen

How easy….

Very easy, quick and quite delightful!

Celery Soup

OK, don’t, like I did, dismiss this out of hand – I cannot believe how unexpectedly, stunningly delicious this soup is! Honestly! I was asked to make celery soup by John, following a visit to his acupuncturist – bear with me – it’s worth it. Just so you’re in the loop, he had his gall-bladder removed two years ago and his digestive system has never been right since (another story for another time). The acupuncture is working (again, another story) but the lovely lady he sees recommended celery soup, saying it would help with digestion. I put off making it for several weeks, pronouncing it dreary and was subsequently astonished at how lovely such a basic soup is. Then comes the good bit – I researched the health properties of celery – wow! It’s a super food – it has incredible properties – I’ve included a summary underneath the recipe. But I urge you to try this one – easy, quick, cheap delicious and spectacularly good for you!!!!!

Serves 4

What you need…

Splash olive/rapeseed oil

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 red onion, chopped

450g celery, cleaned, trimmed and sliced

400ml boiling water from the kettle

1 chicken stock pot (I use Knorr)

What to do…

Pour the hot water onto the stockpot and, using a small balloon whisk, dissolve to create your stock.

In a large saucepan, heat the oil over a moderate heat and then tip in the garlic, onion and celery. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 5 minutes, until softened.

Add the chicken stock, bring it to the boil, pop a lid on the pan and then reduce the heat to low, simmering gently for 15 minutes.

Transfer the soup to your blender and whizz until smooth and thick.

Pour into big mugs or soup bowls and enjoy your celery soup, reflecting that in life, it is often the simple things that bring the most satisfaction. Enjoy!

Tip…

I use Waitrose Cooks’ Ingredients frozen chopped garlic – a quick shake direct into the pan rather than all that peeling and chopping business.

Serving suggestion…

I like this soup straight up, but if wanted a little variation, try a little swizzle of double cream or perhaps a few drops of truffle oil.

Inspired by…

James Tanner, Ready Steady Cook

How easy…

You can practically do it in your sleep!

Let’s talk about celery…

OK, so clearly it contains loads of water and that’s always good. However, if we look at the vitamins and minerals: A, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, K, potassium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, magnesium and calcium are amongst the long list associated with this humble vegetable.

 

Moving along more scientifically, celery is a rich source of flavonoids which studies have shown lower inflammation as well as reducing the risk of heart disease, enhancing the immune system and inhibiting the growth of abnormal cancer-causing cells! It also contains something called pectin-based polysaccharides – including apiuman (I’m out of my depth here) which appear to have special importance in producing anti-inflammatory benefits, with studies demonstrating improved integrity of the stomach lining, decreased risk of stomach ulcers and better control of levels of stomach secretions!

Because chronic oxidative stress and excessive inflammation are key risk factors in the development of many cancer types, it’s not surprising that scientists are interested in the potential benefits of celery intake for cancer prevention. While there is speculation about celery benefits for stomach cancer, colon cancer, and bladder cancer, there are as yet no actual human research studies in any of these areas. Hopefully, future research studies will address the potential cancer-related benefits of celery much more closely.

My vote is that it has to be good for you and that this simple soup is a great way to get your quota!

 

 

 

Red Lentil, Chickpea and Chilli Soup

This is a really wonderful soup, especially when it’s soooo cold out there! The spice provided by the cumin seeds and chilli make you feel all warm inside and give the soup a hint of the Middle-East; then there’s the contrasting fresh kick of the coriander. It’s robust, thick, filling and packed with flavour, it’s also really cheap, very fast and simple. And finally, no naughty ingredients so if you’re doing that whole January dieting thing, this fits in perfectly but tastes fantastic!

Serves 4 – 6

What you need…

850ml water, boiled, straight from the kettle

2 vegetable stock pots (I use Knorr)

2 teaspoons cumin seeds

Pinch of hot chilli powder

Splash rapeseed oil

1 red onion, roughly chopped

140g red lentils

400g can chopped tomatoes

½ 400g can chickpeas (drain and freeze the rest for another time)

Handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped plus some to scatter over the top

What to do…

Make vegetable stock by filling a large jug up to 850ml with boiling water and drop in the two vegetable stock pots. Use a balloon whisk to dissolve and mix in the stock pots.

In a large saucepan, dry-fry the cumin seeds for about a minute or until they start jumping around the pan! Add the chilli powder and give it a quick stir. Then, splash in some rapeseed oil together with the onion and cook for a further 5 minutes on a moderate heat. Stir in the lentils, stock and tomatoes, then bring to the boil. Simmer for 15 minutes.

Chuck in the chickpeas and coriander and then put all the soup ingredients into the blender jug of your food processor. Whizz until the soup is a lovely thick and smooth purée.

Pour into soup bowls or mugs and enjoy the heat and sunshine that emanates from your red lentil, chickpea and chilli soup – lovely.

Inspired by…

www.bbcgoodfood.com

How easy…

Childs’ Play!