Tag Archives: sunday lunch

Luscious Baked Lamb with Rosemary and a Redcurrant and Mint Sauce

The 47th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this recipe belongs to the late summer when the foil-baking ensures the lamb retains its lusciousness!

This is a gorgeous summer Sunday roast recipe. The lamb ends up soft, sweet and juicy and the sweet, tart, piquant sauce is a perfect foil for this delicious joint.

Serves 6

What you need…

1.8 – 2 kg leg of lamb

2 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves plus 3 further sprigs

1 clove garlic

1 tablesp olive oil

½ teaspoon rock salt

Black pepper

for the sauce

3 tablespoons redcurrant jelly

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

4 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

Sea salt and black pepper

for the gravy

275ml dry white wine

Lamb stock cube

Chicken gravy granules

1 dessertspoon/tablespoon redcurrant jelly

Milk

Dash of double cream

What to do…

Crush together the garlic and rock salt to a purée in a pestle and mortar. Add the oil, chopped rosemary and season with salt and pepper.

Spread out a sheet of foil over a large roasting tin, placing the lamb on it. Stab the fleshy parts of the joint several times with a skewer. Now, spread the rosemary mixture all over the upper surface of the lamb and tuck in the sprigs of rosemary – it makes a nice garnish later.

Bring the edges of the foil up over the lamb, make a pleat at the top and scrunch the ends. This foil parcel should be fairly loose to allow the air to circulate. Bake the lamb for 2 hours, then open out the foil, base the joint well with the juices and return it to the oven for a further 30 minutes to brown. The above cooking time should produce the lamb very slightly pink – you can cook it for more or less time if you would prefer.

Meanwhile, make the sauce by combining the redcurrant jelly and vinegar in a small saucepan and whisking over a gentle heat till the jelly melts into the vinegar (a small balloon whisk does this perfectly). Add the chopped mint and some seasoning and pour into a serving jug – the sauce doesn’t need to be warm.

When the lamb is cooked, remove it from the oven and allow it to rest for 20 minutes before carving. Whilst it is resting, spoon out the juices into a jug to make the gravy. Skim the fat off the top of the juices and put the remainder in a saucepan with the white wine. Stir and let it bubble until the gravy becomes syrupy. Add the stock cube for taste and then enough chicken granules to achieve the right consistency. Increase the depth of flavour with the redcurrant jelly. Taste. If it’s too sharp, add a little milk. For added richness, chuck in a dash of double cream.

Serve lamb, sauces and gravy with dauphinoise potatoes and a spring/summer vegetables. Enjoy!

Inspired by…

Delia Smith

How easy…

It’s one of those lazy Sunday dishes that pretty much takes care of itself.

 

 

 

 

 

Venison and Mushroom Suet Pudding

Serves 6 – 8

An alternative to our traditional Sunday Roast, we haven’t had a suet pudding for years and I have to wonder why. The pastry is light but absorbs the flavours of the filling, which in this case was a wonderfully rich mix of venison, mushrooms and port. I loved the theatrical presentation associated with turning it out of its cooking bowl as well – will it, won’t it, will it, won’t it and then almost a sigh as the pudding parted ways with the bowl and plopped onto the plate, to be quickly followed by a rush of wonderful, rich gravy. A proper winter dish this – who cares if it’s cold and windy outside?!

What you need…

1 x 1.5 litre pudding basin, lightly buttered

1 x steamer, saucepan and lid

for the filling

1 beef stock pot (I use Knorr)

300ml boiling water (from the kettle)

300ml port

2 tablespoons well-seasoned self-raising flour

750g venison, diced

2 shallots, chopped

1 leek, trimmed, cut lengthways and then sliced

250g chestnut mushrooms, cleaned and chunkily sliced

Handful thyme sprigs, leaves picked

Sea salt and black pepper

for the pastry

350g self-raising flour

175g shredded beef suet

Sea salt and black pepper

Cold water to mix

What to do…

In a jug dissolve the stock pot into the boiling water. Top up with the port. Set aside.

In a roomy bowl, tip in the seasoned flour. Add the venison and toss around in the flour so that the meat is thoroughly covered. Chuck in the shallots, leek, mushrooms, thyme, salt and pepper. Set aside.

To make the suet pastry, sift the flour into another large mixing bowl and season with salt and pepper. Add the suet and mix the ingredients together using a spatula. When blended, add a few drops of cold water and mix in using the spatula. Keep adding the water a few drops at a time, mixing all the while, until the pastry is claggy and sticky. Either carry on with the spatula or go in with your hands, working the mix together until it is a smooth, elastic dough that leaves the sides of the bowl clean.

Separate ¼ of the dough from the rest and set aside for the lid of your pudding. On a lightly floured work surface, give the remaining dough a quick knead to create a ball and then roll it out to create a circle of about 32cm diameter. Line the bowl with the pastry, gently pressing it into place and leaving some pastry hanging over the lip of the bowl.

Go back to your filling and with your hands, mix everything together so that all the ingredients are evenly distributed. Tip the whole lot into the pastry-lined bowl.

Pour in the stock and port and add more seasoning.

Roll out the pastry lid. Wet the top edges of pudding pastry and pop the lid on, pressing down all around the edges to seal. Trim off the excess pastry.

Cover with a double sheet of foil, pleated in the centre to allow room for expansion while cooking. Secure it with string and then place in a steamer over a saucepan of boiling water. Pop a lid on and then turn the heat down so that the water is simmering. Steam for 5 hours, checking the water level every now and then (I have ruined many a pan steaming Christmas puddings and letting the water run dry – it doesn’t go down well with the husband!)

Now to serve it! You could play safe and serve it straight from the bowl but where’s the fun in that?! Instead, slide a palette knife around the edge and then put your serving plate over the top of the pudding bowl. Tip the whole lot upside down (or in my case, ask John to) so that the plate is now on your work top and the pudding bowl is inverted. Wait, holding your breath, until the pudding gives a sigh and plops onto the plate. Breathe. Rush excitedly to the table with a large serving spoon and dig in. Thoroughly enjoy your Venison and Mushroom Suet Pudding!

Tip…

Instead of peeling and cutting up shallots, try Waitrose Cooks’ Ingredients, frozen, chopped shallots – a quick shake and the job’s done!

Inspired by…

I used Delia Smith’s recipe for the suet pastry and then threw caution to the wind and put in the pudding whatever I fancied – it worked though!

How easy…

It takes minutes to assemble, there’s no pastry-resting business going on and then you just leave it to cook itself so it’s really very easy. It’s not a last minute option though – 5 hours cooking time does require a bit of organisation.

Warm Summer Fruits Pudding with Almonds

This is a proper winter-warming pudding, even though the first ingredient is summer fruits! It’s the perfect conclusion to a long, lingering Sunday Lunch and is immensely satisfying – only the Sunday papers and a doze needs follow…

Serves 6 – 8

What you need…

1 x pretty (because its for a pud) oven-proof dish, greased (mine is 20cms diameter and 10cms deep)

500g summer fruits (I buy frozen and let them defrost overnight)

175g caster sugar, plus ½ tablespoon

175g butter, room temperature

175g ground almonds

85g plain flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 eggs

2 tablespoons milk

2 pears, unpeeled, cored and sliced

What to do…

Pre-heat oven to 170°c / 325°f /gas 3

Tip your defrosted fruit into the ovenproof bowl and stir in the ½ tablespoon of caster sugar.

Tip all the other ingredients except the pears into a food processor and process until thoroughly blended. Pour the mixture over the fruit and smooth over. Arrange the slices of pear on the top, ideally in an overlapping fan.

Bake in the oven for 2 hours!

Check that it is cooked all the way through by poking in a kebab stick – it should come out dry.

Serve straight away, either with warm custard or cold double cream – either way this warm summer fruits pudding with almonds is absolutely delicious.

Tip…

Assemble the fruits in the bowl, cover and pop in the fridge, prepare the pears, cover and pop in the fridge; and then chuck the rest of the ingredients into the processor. You can now leave everything until you’re ready to put them all in the oven – perfect if you’re entertaining. It takes less than five minutes to complete the preparation when you are ready.

Inspired by…

Can’t remember where I plucked this recipe from but I’ve been doing it for years!

How Easy…

Ridiculously! Remember though – 2 hours cooking time (the cooking smell is heavenly!)