Tag Archives: supper

Partridge with Wild Mushroom Ravioli

The 55th of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this dish exudes opulence but is easy to make and a real winter treat.

This is a proper winter indulgence: the rich sauce and delicious partridge perfectly contrasted by the lightness of the ravioli, packed with intense flavour. The first time I made this, I used a pasta machine to make my own pasta and whilst it wasn’t hard, it was messy, time-consuming and quite tricky to deal with the ever-lengthening pasta strips and to get them to the necessary thinness (thick pasta is not great). So, on the basis that life’s too short, I’ve replaced that process with the use of ready-made pasta – it’s a lot easier unless you are a perfectionist with either a lot of time on your hands and a love of clearing up or an absolute whizz with the pasta machine! Given that change, this dish is lovely, indulgent and really quite quick to knock up!

Serves 4

What you need…

2 partridges (ask your butcher to separate and de-bone the breasts from the rest of the birds)

2 small carrots, peeled, topped and tailed

1 onion, peeled and quartered

1 bay leaf

for the ravioli

1 x cookie cutter, 7-8cms wide

12 fresh lasagne sheets

Knob of butter

100g wild/mixed mushrooms

3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves picked

150ml double cream

Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning

for the sauce

1 beef stock pot (I use Knorr)

Splash olive oil

Knob of butter

250g wild/mixed mushrooms

100ml double cream

A few sprigs thyme, to garnish

What to do…

Remove your lasagne sheets from the fridge to come to room temperature.

Separate the partridge breasts from the rest of the birds, leaving the breasts in the fridge for now. Cut from the remaining partridge carcass whatever meat you can get and pop it into your food processor – we’ll get back to that later.

To enhance your sauce, make a quick stock: take a medium saucepan and chuck in the remaining partridge carcass, carrots, onion and bay leaf, season and cover with water. Bring to the boil, cover and then simmer for 20 minutes. Sieve the ‘stock’ into a jug, retaining just 200ml (chuck the rest) and then, using a small balloon whisk, mix in the stock pot. Your stock is now ready. Set aside.

Using a medium-sized frying pan, melt a knob of butter over a moderate heat and then add the mushrooms and thyme, cooking them whilst stirring, for 2 minutes. Throw the cooked mushrooms and thyme together with the cream into the food processor with the partridge. Season and then blend until smooth. If you are preparing in advance you can stick this in the fridge now until you are ready to finish off.

Layout your pasta sheets and using your cookie cutter, cut two circles from each sheet, producing 24 pasta circles. In the centre of 12 of them, place 1 heaped teaspoon of the mushroom/partridge mixture. Brush around the edges with water and then place another pasta circle on top of each and seal, producing 12 ravioli.

Pop a large pan of salted water on a high heat and bring to the boil.

Preheat your oven to 200c / 400f / gas 6.

In your frying pan, add to any left over juices, your splash of olive oil and half the knob of butter.  Once hot, add the partridge breasts and cook skin-side down for 2 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a baking tray and pop in the oven for 5 minutes, skin-side up.

Returning to your frying pan, add a tiny bit more butter and once hot, chuck in the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Add the stock and cook for a further 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Meanwhile, add the ravioli to the boiling water and cook for 4-5 minutes or until they have floated to the top. Remove with your slotted spoon and put three on each plate.

Gradually stir the cream into the mushrooms and stock to create the delicious rich sauce. Transfer to a jug.

Retrieve the partridge breasts from the oven and add to the plates and then pour over the sauce. Garnish with thyme sprigs. Delicious! Serve either just as it is or maybe with some greenery, wilted spinach perhaps. Either way, your partridge with wild mushroom ravioli will be relished: rich, indulgent and absolutely lovely – enjoy!

Inspired by…

James Martin, Saturday Kitchen (I have reduced the amount of butter he is renowned for using!)

How easy…

Really easy if you don’t go down the route of making your own pasta!

 

Grilled Plaice with Mustard and Tarragon Sauce, Asparagus and Peas

The 43rd of 100 recipes chosen from the blog to go into my cookbook, this is an absolutely superb fish supper, with every mouthful to be savoured!

This is a really lovely, delicate and light fish supper. The sauce is quite piquant and, when tasted on its own, really rather strong. But, take a forkful that includes a little fish, greenery and sauce and the combination is fabulous: the sauce is the perfect foil for the delicate fish – it just all works brilliantly. And – bonus – you can make the sauce ahead, leaving just a few minutes cooking of the fish and vegetables just before you want to eat. It’s on the ‘favourites’ list for me!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking tray

500g asparagus, trimmed

100g frozen peas, defrosted

1.5kg plaice, filleted and cut into portions

Splash rapeseed oil

1 baby gem lettuce, shredded

Small knob of butter

Sea salt and black pepper, for seasoning

Olive oil to drizzle

for the sauce

½ fish stockpot (I use Knorr)

100ml boiling water from the kettle

Splash rapeseed oil

2 shallots, peeled and chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

100ml dry, still cider

2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard

100ml double cream

4 teaspoons chopped tarragon, stalks reserved

2 teaspoons capers

What to do…

First, blanch the asparagus. Pop in a deep frying pan of boiling, salted water and simmer vigorously for 2 minutes. Drain and set aside. Dry the frying pan – you’ll be using it again later.

In a jug, create your fish stock by pouring the water from your kettle into a jug and dissolving in the fish stockpot, using a small balloon to whisk. Set aside.

Now to the sauce: heat a splash of rapeseed oil in a pan over a moderate heat. Add the shallots and garlic and cook for 1 minute.  Add the cider vinegar and bring to the boil. Pour in the cider and fish stock and bubble furiously until the stock is reduced by half.  Add the mustard, cream and tarragon stalks and simmer, reducing and thickening the sauce so that it coats the back of a spoon.  Remove the tarragon stalks and discard. Stir in the capers and chopped tarragon. Set aside.

When you’re about ready to eat, preheat your grill to medium and oil your baking tray. Sprinkle salt all over the tray and lay your fish fillets on top, skin side up. Place under the grill and cook for 6 minutes, checking the last minute or two to avoid overcooking.

Meanwhile, put your sauce back on a very gentle heat, just to keep it warm.

Return to your frying pan and splash in the rapeseed oil. When hot, add the lettuce and wilt for 1 minute. Add the asparagus and peas with the knob of butter and warm through for a couple of minutes. Season to taste.

Remove the fish from the grill and leave to rest for a couple of minutes.

To serve, arrange the greenery on warmed plates and place the fish on top, skin side up. Drizzle with a little olive oil and then spoon the sauce around the fish. Don’t attack – it’s to be savoured but remember to get a little bit of everything on each forkful and enjoy the combined flavours – simply lovely!

Tips…

If you can’t get fresh tarragon, chuck in a teaspoon of dried tarragon at the same time as the shallots and garlic.

I have oven-roasted the fish rather than grilling it (we have a temperamental grill) and it’s just as good – check after 6 minutes and maybe cook a wee bit longer.

I have used sea bass fillets when I couldn’t get plaice – lovely.

Inspired by…

Chef, Nathan Outlaw and my bro, who insisted that I couldn’t do this blog without this Nathan Outlaw book in my collection – good call, Martin!

How easy…

Really, really easy and a pleasure to make!

Miso-Marinated Cod with Stir-Fry

A great mid-week family supper that is super-quick to make and has stunning Umami-ish flavours – tangy, tantalising and tasty; it’s gently spicy rather than powerfully hot and so good that I’ve had it three times in two weeks!

Serves 4

What you need…

1 x baking tray, lined with foil

4 x bamboo skewers

650g skinless cod/haddock fillets, cut into cubes

4 spring onions, trimmed and sliced

4cm ginger, peeled and sliced thinly

1 teaspoon dried, crushed chillis

2 x 300g packs of your favourite vegetable stir-fry

1 tablespoon rapeseed oil

2 tablespoon hoisin sauce

2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce

Sea salt and black pepper

Lime wedges, to serve (optional)

for the marinade

2 tablespoon miso paste

4 tablespoons maple syrup

2 tablespoons mirin

4 tablespoons light soy sauce

Juice of 1 lime

What to do…

First to the marinade: combine all the ingredients in a bowl, season with a little black pepper. Add the fish, then cover and chill for anything between 15 minutes and overnight (I did an hour).

Preheat your oven to 200˚c / 400˚f / gas 6.

Thread the fish onto skewers, then arrange on your baking tray.

Drizzle a tablespoon of the remaining marinade over each skewer and pop into the oven until cooked though (10minutes) turning half way through cooking.

Heat the rapeseed oil in a large frying pan over a high heat. Add the spring onions, ginger and chilli and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Tip in the vegetables, hoisin and sweet chilli sauces and stir-fry for 5-6 minutes, or until just tender. Serve with the fish skewers and extra lime wedges for squeezing over. Absolutely delightful and prepared in minutes!

Inspired by…

Tesco.com

How easy…

Ridiculously!

Hazelnut and Parmesan-Crusted Chicken

Along the same lines as Chicken Kiev and Chicken Cordon Bleu, this absolutely delicious way of serving chicken is made fabulous by the ridiculous quantity of butter used to cook it! Ignoring any negative aspects of the butter mountain, it guarantees that this dish is truly scrumptious – perfect for perking up a mid-week supper.

Serves 4

What you need…

4 boneless chicken breasts, skinned

40g hazelnuts

25g Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

2 lemons, zested, then quartered

2 sprigs of thyme, leaves picked

40g panko breadcrumbs

75g plain flour

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 eggs, beaten

250g unsalted butter!!!!!

What to do…

Put one chicken breast between two pieces of greaseproof paper and bash with a rolling pin until about 1cm thick. Repeat with the other three chicken breasts.

Pop the hazelnuts, Parmesan, lemon zest and thyme in your food processor and whizz to fine crumbs. Tip in the breadcrumbs and pulse to combine. Tip the mixture into a wide, shallow bowl.

Tip the flour into a wide, shallow bowl and season with salt and pepper.

Tip the beaten egg into a third wide, shallow bowl.

Heat the butter in a large frying pan over a high heat.

Dip each piece of chicken first in the flour, then the egg and finally the breadcrumb mixture and then put all four breasts into the hot butter and sauté until golden – about 5 minutes on each side – basting with the butter throughout.

Drain on kitchen paper and then serve, drizzling over the hot butter from the pan and squeezing over a little lemon juice – truly scrumptious!

Inspired by…

With that amount of butter it has to be James Martin.

How easy…

Dead easy and yummingly good!

 

 

 

Mary’s Kedgeree

So, I’ve made kedgeree before, albeit with hake because I couldn’t get hold of haddock (!) and thoroughly enjoyed it. But, when I saw ma’am making it as part of her current ‘Classic’ TV series, my interest was sufficiently piqued to give her version a go and….it is really, really good: rich and flavoursome – it tastes like an absolute treat and I’ll definitely be doing it again. Supposedly a recipe for an indulgent, leisurely breakfast, it works equally well as a lovely family supper (speaking from experience).

Serves 4

What you need…

A couple of splashes of rapeseed oil

3 onions: 2 thinly sliced and 1 finely chopped

Sea salt and black pepper

500g smoked haddock fillets (I used dyed but Mary specifies undyed)

100g smoked salmon

250g basmati rice

3 cardamom pods, split

3cm-long cinnamon stick

450ml cold water

½ teaspoon turmeric

2 large, happy eggs

30g butter

100ml single cream

2 tablespoons coriander, finely chopped

Cayenne pepper, to taste

Juice of ½ lemon

What to do…

Heat your first splash of oil in a medium-sized frying pan over a moderate heat and sauté the two sliced onions gently, for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally until they are crisp and deep golden brown.

Season with salt and pepper, tip out on kitchen paper, and set aside in a warm place.

Put the haddock, skin-side down, in a large, deep-sided frying pan and pour over enough water to just cover. Simmer, covered, over a low heat for 5-8 minutes until cooked through. Remove from the heat. Lay the smoked salmon in the liquid, cover, and let stand for 2 minutes. Drain the fish, discard the skins and flake into large chunks. Set aside.

Wipe out your large frying pan with kitchen paper and then add your second splash of oil, warming over a moderate heat. Add the chopped onion, cardamom pods, and cinnamon and sauté about 5 minutes, or until the onion is golden-brown. Tip in the rice and stir through. Pour in the cold water and stir in the turmeric. Bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, stir, cover, and cook for 12-15 minutes or until the water is absorbed. Take the rice off the heat and let it stand, covered, for 5 minutes before fluffing up the grains with a fork.

Meanwhile, boil your eggs. Pop them in a saucepan of boiling water and simmer for 6 minutes, a little longer if you like the yolks cooked more. Remove from the heat, drain then pour cold water over the eggs. When they are cool enough to handle, peel and quarter.

Remove the cinnamon stick from the rice and carefully stir in the butter, cream, coriander, fish, and eggs. Season with salt and cayenne pepper and squeeze in the lemon juice. Heat thoughly over a low heat, stirring gently once or twice, making sure you don’t break up the fish.

Serve your stupendously yummy kedgeree topped with the warm crispy onion: enjoy!

Inspired by…

Mary Berry

How easy…

Very easy and satisfying to make

 

Super-Fast Sassy Salmon and Stir Fry Supper

Sooooo easy, soooooo fast and sooooo tasty: a perfect mid week family supper! I found this unusual marinade of maple syrup with wholegrain mustard at my friend, Denise’s house, while visiting her home in Abu Dhabi last November. We love this sassy version of salmon so much, we’ve had it practically once a week since we got back.

What you need…

1 x baking tray

4 chunky salmon fillets

2 tablespoons maple syrup

1 heaped teaspoon wholegrain mustard

for the stir-fry

Splash of rapeseed oil

4 garlic cloves, crushed and finely chopped

Large knob of fresh root ginger, peeled and grated

½ teaspoon dried crushed chilli

2 bags of ready-prepared stir fry veg – whichever mix takes your fancy

2 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine

2 tablespoons maple syrup

2 tablespoons light soy sauce

A few spring onions, sliced, to garnish (optional)

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 200˚c / 400˚f / gas 6.

In a cup, mix together 2 tablespoons maple syrup with the whole grain mustard. Pop your salmon fillets onto the baking tray and spoon over the syrup mix. Whop into the oven for 20 minutes.

Around 10 minutes into the salmon’s cooking time, take a wok or deep wide saucepan and warm your oil over a moderate-high heat and then toss in the garlic, ginger and chilli. Cook for 1 minute, stirring continuously.

Whop the heat up to high and chuck in the stir fry vegetables and cook according to the packet instructions (usually 6 minutes, stirring and tossing continuously). 2 minutes before the end, tip in the Chinese cooking wine, maple syrup and soy sauce – stir and toss. Scatter with spring onion slices, if using.

That’s it! Serve your delicious, sassy salmon with a heaped portion of equally fab stir fry and enjoy. So easy, so fast and I kid you not, so tasty – enjoy!!!!

Serving suggestion…

Serve the salmon with stir fry in the winter and a rocket-based salad in the summer. I bet it would go well barbecued as well….

Tip…

I’ve also used this glaze on chicken breasts and that’s pretty good too!

Inspired by…

My lovely but far-too-distant friend, Denise! And the stir-fry ingredients are adapted from a Ching He Huang recipe that I use.

How easy…

It couldn’t be any easier!

Pot-Roast Chicken Thighs with Parsnips

This dish may not look that great but boy, it’s packed with flavour! The meat is succulent, the parsnips somehow enhance in taste and the sauce is delicious and creamy. An absolutely perfect supper dish for a winter’s evening.

Serves 4

What you need…

Splash of rapeseed oil

6 shallots, sliced in half

4 parsnips, peeled and chunked

8 garlic cloves, chopped

12-16 chicken thighs, filleted (quantity depends on your appetite!)

Black pepper and sea salt

500ml hot water from the kettle

1 chicken stock pot (I use Knorr)

12 sprigs thyme

20 juniper berries, lightly crushed

200ml double cream

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4.

Use a balloon whisk to beat the stockpots into the hot water to create your chicken stock.

Over a moderate heat, warm the rapeseed oil in a casserole dish for which you have a lid. Toss in the shallots, parsnips and garlic and cook until lightly brown. Remove ingredients from pan with a slotted spoon.

Season the chicken with black pepper and then brown lightly in the oil. Remove, again using the slotted spoon.

Pour the chicken stock into the pan and bring to the boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to mix in any delicious leftover morsels.

Return the chicken and vegetables to the pan, tuck in the thyme sprigs and season with a little salt and chuck in the juniper berries. When everything returns to the boil, pop on the lid and put the casserole into your oven for 30 minutes.

Remove the chicken pieces and wrap in foil to keep warm.

Turn the hob heat up high and reduce the liquid by half – it won’t thicken but will give you sweet, creamy juices. Stir in the cream and check the seasoning. Return the chicken to the pan and cook for a couple minutes more to make sure everything is thoroughly hot.

Serve in shallow bowls, maybe with some fresh doorsteps of bread on the side to dunk.

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater, although he used partridges rather than chicken thighs. I tried it with parsnips but found the wee birds a pain to pick the meat off. Filleted chicken thighs mean you can just tuck straight in.

How easy…

Very easy but it does take a little faffing about – well worth it though!

Black Pudding and Baked Apples with Celeriac and Mustard Mash

A rather unusual and gorgeous combination this! Creamy mash providing the perfect foil for the rich black pudding and luscious apple – a great little supper dish of comfort and joy…. and so very easy!

Serves 4

What you need…

750g celeriac, peeled and chunked

Squeeze of lemon

350g potatoes, peeled and chunked

3 bay leaves

4 small, firm dessert apples

60g butter, plus a few extra knobs

500g black pudding, cut into four thick slices

1 tablespoon wholegrain mustard

Sea salt and black pepper

A small handful of parsley, chopped finely, to garnish (optional)

What to do…

Preheat your oven to 180˚c / 350˚f / gas 4.

Chuck the celeriac pieces into a large saucepan of salted water and add a squeeze of lemon to stop them discolouring. Add the potato chunks and bring to the boil. Throw in the bay leaves and season with a pinch of salt, lower the heat and leave to cook, bubbling gently for about 20 minutes, until tender.

Meanwhile, score the apples around the middle, cutting just under the skin. Place them on a baking tray, top each with a knob of butter and pop them in the oven for 15 minutes. Place the black pudding slices on the same tray, dot with butter and pop back in the oven for a further 15 – 20 minutes, until the black pudding is sizzling and the apples are fluffed up.

Drain the vegetables and tip them into your food processor with the 60g butter. Whizz until smooth, light and creamy. Fold in the mustard and a good grinding of black pepper.

For each lucky person, serve generous scoops of mash onto warmed plates; top with a thick slice of sizzling black pudding and crown with a lovely hot, sweet apple. Enjoy a little of each element on every forkful – comfort and joy!

Inspired by…

Nigel Slater

How easy…

Dead easy!

 

Spicy Garlic Prawns, Water Chestnuts and Bamboo Shoots with Ginger Pak Choi

A lovely, zinglingly spicy, flavoursome and fragrant Chinese stir fry that’s perfect for a family supper and super fast to throw together. Fabulous!

Serves: 4

What you need…

Splash of rapeseed oil

4 garlic cloves, crushed and finely chopped

Large knob of fresh root ginger, peeled and grated

½ teaspoon dried crushed chilli

450g raw king prawns, shelled

2 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine

1 x 225g can of water chestnuts, drained

1 x 225g can of bamboo shoots, drained

½ teaspoon sriracha chilli sauce (extra hot)

2 tablespoons runny honey

2 tablespoons low-sodium light soy sauce

6 spring onions, trimmed and sliced

for the pak choi

Splash of rapeseed oil

1 pinch of flaky sea salt

A few slices of peeled ginger (your preference)

300g pak choi, leaves separated and roughly torn

A tiny splash of Chinese cooking wine

1 teaspoon light soy sauce

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

What to do…

Heat a wok over a high heat until smokin’ and add the rapeseed oil.

Chuck in the garlic, ginger and chilli and stirfry for a few seconds to release their aroma.

Tip in the tiger prawns and leave to sear and brown for a few seconds, then flip them over and cook for 1 minute. Add the Chinese cooking wine followed by the water chestnuts, bamboo shoots and spring onions. Toss to mix together, then add the sriracha, honey and light soy sauce and toss for a few seconds to incorporate everything together.

Meanwhile, heat a second wok or frying pan over high heat and add the rapeseed oil. Give the oil a swirl.

Add the salt and ginger and stir for 3 seconds before adding the pak choi. Toss for 30 seconds.

Add a drop of Chinese cooking wine to create some steam to help steam-cook the vegetables.

Drizzle in light soy and toasted sesame oil and toss one last time, not overcooking the pak choi.

Tip…

Have someone else cook the pak choi – it all happens so fast and I certainly couldn’t stir and toss both dishes at the same time…might just be me though!!!!

Serving Suggestion…

A little steamed rice completes the dish perfectly

Inspired by…

Ching He Huang

How easy…

Very easy and super fast!

 

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